Streams

Katya Rogers

Katya Rogers is the Senior Producer for On the Media

Katya Rogers is the Executive Producer of WNYC and NPR’s On the Media. Her whole radio career has been at OTM; from lowly-intern to overlord executive producer. Over a decade of watching, reading and listening to the media so you don’t have to: from the media sh*t-storm that was the 2000 election to the attacks of September 11th, and from the ascendency of the internet, to the death of newspapers. Before OTM there were a slew of random media-related jobs including editing Time Out’s Bar Guide, production assistant on the HBO/BBC feature documentary “Unmade Beds” and copy editor at every glossy magazine in New York including John F. Kennedy Jnr’s George Magazine. She lives in New York with her Peabody award.

What word would the other producers use to describe you?

bossy

What embarrasses you about your media diet?

I watch the bachelor/bachelorette and also Survivor. I’m told I should be embarrassed. But I don’t know why. Also, I’m addicted to televisionwithoutpity.com where I relive the joys of watching my crap tv shows.

What is your favorite thing about On the Media?

How we ask the questions other shows just don’t have the cojones to ask. I particularly like when Brooke says “Waaaaaait a minute…” when someone has bs’d her. 

More about the staff of On The Media

Katya Rogers appears in the following:

How We Watch TV

Friday, December 28, 2012

There are a lot of ways to watch TV: free streaming online, via a traditional cable or satellite package, paying for services like Hulu Plus, etc. But the TV industry makes vastly different amounts of money depending on how you choose to watch. We invited Peter Kafka, media reporter for the website All Things Digital, to play the part of a moustache-twirling cable baron, and explain which of our staffers have viewing habits he can support, and why.


Earle Hagen and Herbert W. Spencer - The Fishin' Hole

Red Foley - Television

Comments [10]

How We Watch TV

Friday, May 25, 2012

There are a lot of ways to watch TV -- free streaming online, via a traditional cable or satellite package, paying for services like Hulu Plus, etc. But the TV industry makes vastly different amounts of money depending on how you choose to watch. We invited Peter Kafka, media reporter for the website All Things Digital to play the part of a mustache-twirling cable baron and explain which of our staffers have viewing habits he can support and why.


Earle Hagen and Herbert W. Spencer - The Fishin' Hole

Red Foley - Television

Comments [10]