Streams

Joseph Capriglione

WNYC/NJPR

Joseph Capriglione appears in the following:

How Will Hospitals Change after the Supreme Court's Ruling?

Thursday, June 28, 2012

The political guessing game will finally end just hours from now when the Supreme Court announces its ruling on President Obama's health care bill, the Affordable Care Act. Hospitals across the country are already adapting to a growing number of uninsured Americans, but after today's announcement the entire industry of medical services could change in a very substantial way.

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Both Sides Prepare for Aftermath of the Supreme Court's Healthcare Ruling

Friday, June 22, 2012

The Supreme Court says they won't issue their ruling on President Obama's signature healthcare bill until next week, but that hasn't stopped both parties from preparing for the fallout. Takeaway Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich says a ruling against the law presents challenges not just for Democrats, but for Republicans as well.

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Romney Makes Appeal to Latino Voters

Friday, June 22, 2012

During primary season, Mitt Romney was attracting barely more than a quarter of the Latino vote. But yesterday, at the meeting of the National Association of Latino and Elected Appointed Officials, or NALEO, the prospective GOP nominee made his pitch. Where does Romney go from here as he seeks to make inroads with the Latino community?

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The Supreme Court's Healthcare Hearings Go Under the Microscope

Tuesday, June 19, 2012

Trial consultant Ryan Malphurs explains what three-day marathon sessions tell us about how the Roberts court works, why Chief Justice John Roberts might end up being the swing vote, and offers his predictions on the court's decision on President Obama's Affordable Care Act.

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Promoting a Culture of Science in the United States

Monday, June 18, 2012

There are many stereotypes associated with the sciences, including the ideas that scientific fields are out-of-reach, too intellectual, or exclusively for men and academia. The outgoing president of M.I.T. discusses these problems and says that the United States must create a culture of the sciences in order to generate interest in the masses.

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Jackie Joyner Kersee on the Legacy of Title IX

Monday, June 18, 2012

Forty years ago today, Congress passed Title IX. The landmark civil rights law barred gender discrimination in the country’s schools and colleges, but it is perhaps best known for its impact on female participation on women’s high school and college sports.

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Jamie Dimon and the Art of Apologizing

Friday, June 15, 2012

Earlier this week JP Morgan chief Jamie Dimon went up to Capitol Hill. He sat in front of a Senate committee, and Dimon... apologized. This got Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich thinking about other instances of public figures apologizing to Congress.

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Taking Stock: Latinos and the 2012 Election

Thursday, June 14, 2012

As part of our coverage of this political year we are doing what a lot of people in the U.S. are doing as they think about voting for a new President: Taking stock of the last four years and looking ahead to the next 12 months. We sat down with former Assistant Secretary of the Treasury George Munoz to discuss the role Latinos are poised to play in this year's presidential election.

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June 14, 1922: An Important Day for Radio

Thursday, June 14, 2012

Ninety years ago today, President Warren G. Harding made history by being the first President to deliver an address on the radio. What was the immediate impact of the broadcast of President Harding's address and how do we continue to feel that impact in today's media environment?

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Mega-lawsuit Alleges NFL Concealed Concussion Information

Friday, June 08, 2012

A new lawsuit accuses the NFL of concealing information linking football-related head trauma to permanent brain injuries. Many of the plaintiffs have already suffered the long-term effects of their injuries, and others are worried about what's to come.

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Romney, GOP Trump Obama and Dems in May Campaign Fundraising

Friday, June 08, 2012

Fundraising was long thought to be a strength of the Obama campaign operation. But in his first full month as the presumptive Republican nominee, Mitt Romney and the Republican National Committee raised more than $76 million. That easily bested President Obama and the Democrat's $60 million haul.

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Arizona's Immigrant Law Results in Upsurge of "Self-Deportation"

Tuesday, April 24, 2012

During the GOP Primaries, likely nominee Mitt Romney preached an immigration policy of "self-deportation". It just so happens that in the wake of the passage of SB 1070, Arizona's controversial immigration law, many of that state's undocumented immigrants are practicing self-deportation. But they're not necessarily going back to Mexico. Instead, many are crossing the border into surrounding states with more lenient immigration laws on the books. We're joined by Peter O'Dowd, News Director at KJZZ.

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This Week's Agenda: Arizona's Immigration Law Goes Before the Supreme Court, Romney Continues on the Campaign Trail, & Panic Returns to the Eurozone

Monday, April 23, 2012

This week, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments for and against the constitutionality of SB 1070, Arizona's controversial immigration law. The case and the Court's decision are sure to play a roll in this year's elections. Mitt Romney has all but wrapped up the GOP nomination. But with five primaries in Romney-friendly territory in the Northeast, why is the presumptive nominee still campaigning so hard in primary states? And panic returns to the Eurozone, with renewed fear over Spain and Italy. This weekend's first round of presidential elections in France only further clouds the Eurozone's future. To talk about these issues and more, we're joined by Takeaway and WNYC Economics Editor Charlie Herman, and Molly Ball, Staff Writer for The Atlantic.

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US, Afghanistan Reach Strategic Partnership Agreement

Monday, April 23, 2012

After months of on and off negotiations, the U.S. and Afghanistan have announced a strategic partnership agreement that ensures an American presence in Afghanistan until at least 2024 – a full decade after U.S. combat troops are scheduled to withdraw from the country in 2014. But the agreement, whose text was not released, does not include many specifics at all. We're joined by Ambassador Akbar Ahmed, Chair of Islamic Studies at American University.

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Everyday Life, Politicized

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

Everyone acknowledges that our nation's politics are as polarized as any time in recent memory. But some observers worry that polarization is carrying over into areas outside the public sphere. Steffen Schmidt, contributor to It's a Free Country, thinks the politicization of everyday life is a terrible development and is concerned about its implications for the country's future. Tom Edsall is a professor at the Columbia Journalism School and author of "The Age of Austerity: How Scarcity Will Remake American Politics."

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The Romney Campaign's Image Makeover

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

It's no secret that Mitt Romney has a bit of an image problem with the American public. In an ABC News/Washington Post poll released late last month, the presumed Republican nominee had the lowest favorability rating of any major Presidential contender since the poll's launch. But in the past week, the campaign has begun to reorient itself. Explaining the Romney campaign's reorientation is Anna Sale, reporter for It's A Free Country, and Ron Christie, republican strategist and Takeaway contributor.

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Catching Up With Herman Cain

Thursday, April 12, 2012

He may no longer be making headlines or dropping one-liners at the debates, but former GOP front-runner Herman Cain is still an active presence in the Republican Party. The "Hermanator" spoke last night at an event sponsored by the Columbia University College Republicans. Stephen Reader, contributor to It's A Free Country, spoke with the GOP star about his campaign, the remaining Republican field, and his series of controversial YouTube videos.

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President Obama Minus Rick Santorum

Wednesday, April 11, 2012

With all the talk of Rick Santorum bowing out of the GOP race, solidifying Mitt Romney's status as the Party's likely choice to face off against President Obama, it's easy to forget about the Democrats. They have the White House to secure, a slim lead to retain in the Senate, and, oh yeah, they'd like to take back the House too! There's likely no one as deeply involved in the Democrats' 2012 campaign as Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz, Chair of the Democratic National Committee.

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Couch Surfing Goes Mainstream

Tuesday, April 10, 2012

It's long been said that when you travel, the best way to get to know a new place is to meet the people who live there. And, while it's not always possible, perhaps the best way to know the locals is to live among them, maybe spend a night or two on their couch. Patricia Marx wrote about couch surfing for The New Yorker. Valerie is a couch surfer from Chicago.

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President Obama to Make Buffett Rule Central Focus of Campaign

Tuesday, April 10, 2012

The pressure is on. The Senate isn’t set to vote on the so-called “Buffett Rule” until next week. But the White House is already setting the stage to make the rule, which would require those making more than a million dollars a year to pay at least 30 percent in federal income tax, a central plank of President Obama’s re-election campaign. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich joins us.

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