Streams

Jonah Lehrer

Jonah Lehrer appears in the following:

The 'Decline Effect' and Scientific Truth

Friday, June 29, 2012

Surprising and exciting scientific findings capture our attention and captivate the press.  But what if, at some point after a finding has been soundly established, it starts to disappear?  In a special collaboration with Radiolab we look at the 'decline effect' when more data tells us less, not more, about scientific truth.

Correction: An earlier version of this short incorrectly stated that Jonathan Schooler saw the effect size of his study fall by 30% on two different occasions. In fact, he saw it fall by that amount the first time he repeated the study and saw a general downward trend thereafter. The audio has been adjusted to reflect this fact.

 

Correction: An earlier version of this short incorrectly attributed a statement to Jonathan Schooler’s advisor. The statement was actually made by his colleague. The audio has been adjusted to reflect this fact.

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Unraveling Bolero

Monday, June 18, 2012

In this podcast, a story about obsession, creativity, and a strange symmetry between a biologist and a composer that revolves around one famously repetitive piece of music.

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Scientific Retractions on the Rise

Friday, June 08, 2012

When a paper released by a scientific journal turns out to be wrong, either due to human error or intentional fraud , the journal’s editors often will issue a retraction advising scientists to disregard the research. A Wall Street Journal study has found the number of such retractions to be soaring. New Yorker science writer Jonah Lehrer tells Brooke what he thinks is going on.

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Revisiting the Science of Creativity with Jonah Lehrer

Monday, May 28, 2012

This week we're revisiting some of the best Takeaway interviews from the last year. Here, John talks with Jonah Lehrer, science journalist and author of "Imagine: How Creativity Works," about what made some of history's most creative minds tick. They'll discuss W.H. Auden's drug of choice and why Skype hasn't replaced the face-to-face encounter.

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Rippin' the Rainbow a New One

Monday, May 21, 2012

We tear into this show with a dark scene from 1665. A young Isaac Newton, hoping to ride out the plague by heading to the country to puzzle over the deep mysteries of the universe, finds himself wondering about light. And vision. He wants to get to the bottom of ...

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Colors

Monday, May 21, 2012

Radiolab rips the rainbow a new one.

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Gut Feelings

Monday, April 02, 2012

While Jad was on paternity leave, Carl Zimmer told Robert and producer Soren Wheeler about the ecosystem inside each and every one of us. According to Carl, when we're in the womb, we have no bacteria in us at all, but as soon as we're born we start gathering up ...

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Guts

Monday, April 02, 2012

A look at the messy mystery in our middles, and what the rumblings deep in our bellies can tell us about ourselves.

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Watch: Jonah Lehrer on Whether War is Inevitable

Tuesday, March 27, 2012

Jonah Lehrer, contributing editor at Wiredfrequent contributor to The New Yorker and Radiolab, and author of the new book, Imagine: How Creativity Work recently visited the WNYC studios. He answered the question at the center of our series End of War: Is War Inevitable?

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Jonah Lehrer on How to Expand Your Imagination

Friday, March 23, 2012

Where do most artists and inventors get their creative impulse? Author and journalist Jonah Lehrer explores the science behind imagination in his new book "Imagine: How Creativity Works."

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Cosmic Habituation

Tuesday, May 03, 2011

In this short, Jonathan Schooler tells us about a discovery that launched his career and led to a puzzle that has haunted him ever since.

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You Are Here

Tuesday, January 25, 2011

When Sharon Roseman was five years old, something strange happened. She was playing a game with her friends, and when she took off her blindfold--she didn't know where she was. She was lost on her own block, in her own backyard. For most of her life, Sharon feared it was ...

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Lost & Found

Tuesday, January 25, 2011

Stories about getting lost, and how our brains, and our hearts, help us find our way back home.

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Studies Show.... Or Do They?

Friday, December 10, 2010

Jonah Lehrer talks about his New Yorker article on the limitations of the scientific method and how difficult it is for studies to actually prove anything.

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Your Future in a Marshmallow

Friday, October 15, 2010

Fate may not be written in the stars, but what if it’s written in our genes? First, Paul Auster raises the specter of "rhyming events," his term for those spooky coincidences that seem more than ordinary mathematical flukes.

Then, a seemingly simple experiment devised by Walter Mischel ...

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It's Alive?

Friday, October 08, 2010

There's no scientific metric for measuring a city's personality. But hit the streets, and you can see and feel it. Sxip Shirey avoided New York City most of his life. But as an aspiring musician, he decided that moving there was a necessary evil. Then, one night on a ...

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Under Pressure: Tiger at the Masters

Monday, April 05, 2010

It’s been over four months since the story of his extramarital affairs made headlines all over the world, and now, Tiger Woods will get back to golf.

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Limits

Monday, April 05, 2010

A journey to the edge of human limits -- from a bike race that makes the Tour de France look like child’s play, to a mind-stretching memory competition.

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Animal Minds

Monday, January 11, 2010

Communicating across species -- from bringing pets to church, to a rescued whale that may have found a way to say thanks.

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Science: A Brain's Appetite

Tuesday, July 28, 2009

Today in The Takeaway's Science segment, we talk about neuroscience. A handful of new studies suggest that in matters of weight loss, will power could lose out to brainpower. The brain, which is an organ designed to seek out calories, could outsmart the tricks we play on it, such as drinking diet soft drinks. Joining The Takeaway to talk about the brains behind our bulk is Jonah Lehrer. He is The Takeaway’s science contributor and author of the books "How We Decide" and "Proust Was a Neuroscientist." Todd Zwillich, The Takeaway's Washington Correspondent also joins the conversation to talk about how health policy could be used to encourage better eating habits.

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