Streams

Jon Hamilton

Jon Hamilton appears in the following:

How Can Identical Twins Turn Out So Different?

Thursday, May 09, 2013

Scientists used to think that identical twins turned out differently because they were treated differently by friends, teachers or their parents. A study of mice supports the idea that small changes in behavior can lead to larger ones and eventually even resculpt brains in different ways.

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Imagine A Flying Pig: How Words Take Shape In The Brain

Thursday, May 02, 2013

Linguists used to think the human brain had a specific region devoted to understanding language. But brain scans now indicate that regions controlling vision, movement, taste, smell and touch are all called into action when we think of a word, too.

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A Sleep Gene Has A Surprising Role In Migraines

Wednesday, May 01, 2013

Disruptions of sleep are well known as migraine triggers, but now researchers have found a genetic link between the two. In studying families with lots of migraines, they also found a mutation on a gene that helps control circadian rhythms.

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A Tale Of Mice And Medical Research, Wiped Out By A Superstorm

Thursday, April 25, 2013

When Superstorm Sandy flooded lower Manhattan last year, thousands of lab animals drowned and many scientists lost months or even years of work. The specialty animals can be very difficult to replace, but researchers say the loss of animal life is emotionally devastating and difficult to get over.

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Genetically Modified Rat Is Promising Model For Alzheimer's

Tuesday, April 09, 2013

Drug companies have developed several Alzheimer's drugs that seemed to work in mice but did not help people with the disease. So scientists inserted human genes into rats in hopes of getting a better model for testing the drugs.

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Listen Up To Smarter, Smaller Hearing Aids

Monday, April 08, 2013

Today's devices are smaller and much more powerful than they were 20 years ago. New advances in technology can't solve all hearing problems, but they've improved many aspects of life for people with hearing loss.

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Obama's Plan To Explore The Brain: A 'Most Audacious Project'

Tuesday, April 02, 2013

The White House is asking Congress for $100 million to develop new tools for "eavesdropping" on millions of cellular conversations, as individual neurons interact to form thoughts or create memories. The goal is more ambitious than the Human Genome Project, researchers say.

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Mapping The Brain Could Be Harder Than The Human Genome

Tuesday, April 02, 2013

President Obama has unveiled a plan to learn more about the inner workings of the human brain. It calls for including $100 million in the 2014 budget to launch what's being called the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) initiative. The goal is to help researchers find ways to cure or prevent brain disorders including Alzheimer's disease.

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Number Of Early Childhood Vaccines Not Linked To Autism

Friday, March 29, 2013

A government study of the medical records of 1,000 kids found no correlation between the number of vaccines a child received and his or her risk of autism spectrum disorder. Experts hope the finding will allay some parents who worry that many vaccines on one day or in the first two years of life may lead to autism.

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Maybe Isolation, Not Loneliness, Shortens Life

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

Loneliness and isolation often go hand in hand, so teasing out which factor is harder on health isn't easy. But a British study now suggests that, while loneliness may make you unhappy, it's social isolation that could take years off of your life. Discuss (with a friend).

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How An Unlikely Drug Helps Some Children Consumed By Fear

Monday, March 25, 2013

When abiding fear takes over some kids' lives, they respond with anger and aggression that's not premeditated. One psychiatrist says he's finding profound relief for a particular subgroup of these children in experimental research with the anesthesia drug ketamine.

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Alzheimer's 'Epidemic' Now A Deadlier Threat To Elderly

Tuesday, March 19, 2013

Deaths from the disease have increased by 68 percent between 2000 and 2010. One reason: We're living longer, and deaths from other causes, like heart disease and prostate cancer, are going down.

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Hear That? In A Din Of Voices, Our Brains Can Tune In To One

Wednesday, March 06, 2013

Scientists are beginning to understand how people focus on a single voice in a crowded, noisy room. This ability, known as the "cocktail party effect," appears to rely on areas of the brain that have completely filtered out unwanted sounds.

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How Did Our Brains Evolve To Equate Food With Love?

Friday, March 01, 2013

Until recently, our brains' way of connecting food with love and a sense of well-being was purely a good thing. But in a world where it's possible to feast every day, it can be a problem.

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Medical Records Could Yield Answers On Fracking

Wednesday, May 16, 2012

Is fracking making people sick? The question has ignited a national debate. A proposed study in northern Pennsylvania could help resolve the issue. By mining more than 10 years' worth of patient records, researchers hope to better understand the potential impact of hydraulic fracturing on health.

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How Your Brain Is Like Manhattan

Thursday, March 29, 2012

The human brain may be just three pounds of jelly. But it turns out that jelly is very organized. New scanning techniques show that the brain's communications pathways are laid out in a highly ordered three-dimensional grid that look a bit like a map of Manhattan.

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'I Wanted To Live': New Depression Drugs Offer Hope For Toughest Cases

Tuesday, January 31, 2012

The anesthetic and club drug ketamine seems to lift depression symptoms in a matter of hours. But how does it work? Researchers are searching for the answer in an attempt to make a new class of depression medications. "We can take care of a migraine in hours," one researcher asks. "So why do we have to wait weeks or months with depression?"

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Could A Club Drug Offer 'Almost Immediate' Relief From Depression?

Monday, January 30, 2012

Currently, there's no quick fix for severe depression. Antidepressants usually take weeks to work, if they work at all. But patients who received experimental doses of ketamine — long used as an anesthetic, and an illegal club drug — report an astounding relief from their symptoms in less than a day.

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