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°F We should be hitting 90 degrees today. Hear what this means for Maeve, a curator at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden.

John Hockenberry

Host, The Takeaway

John Hockenberry appears in the following:

Remembering Richard Holbrooke

Tuesday, December 14, 2010

Richard Holbrooke, the United States Special Representative to Afghanistan and Pakistan, passed away yesterday after undergoing a marathon surgery that failed to save his life. He was 69. Across a long career in foreign policy, Holbrooke dedicated his life to brokering peace and stability throughout the world on behalf of the United States.

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Your Photos of Home

Monday, November 22, 2010

We've been asking listeners to use the new Takeaway iPhone app and call in to tell us about their idea of home. You've been sending the sound and pictures of the things that make a place a home for you. Here are the voices behind two of those photos: Alexandra Haller from Northville, Mich. and Danielle Sager from Colorado Springs.

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An Old Screen Door and the Creaking Floor Board

Monday, November 22, 2010

This week as we contemplate the holidays we've all been thinking about home. What is it? Where is it? We've been getting a lot of examples from you, and every one of them makes me think, how would I answer that question?

In my home, a big old 110-year-old house my wife and I have had for almost as long as we've been married, the piano is the center, where you can hear folks playing away on a quiet Sunday afternoon.

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'Harry Potter and the Deathly Hollows' Review by a Tired Father

Friday, November 19, 2010

We got to the theater at 11:43 and a large shivering line of Muggles was already waiting for a chance to see the half dozen “midnight” shows of "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1." There were Harrys, and Hermiones, and Ron Weasleys in full regalia. Fans fully decked out in Hogwarts uniforms and round rimmed glasses were everywhere.

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Detroit's Players, Seen Through an Operatic Lens

Monday, November 15, 2010

Thinking about the Detroit Opera company trying to survive Detroit’s economic woes, it certainly seems that the abandoned buildings and tragic urban landscape of parts of Detroit  provide that city with an opportunity for theater at the very least.

The stark triumph (or not so much) over adversity themes in "La Boheme" ought to make it a Motown fave given the economy. You could stage it in some of Detroit's most troubled neighborhoods. "Boheme" is obvious though, so why not imagine other stories of operas starring some of the fallen, or embracing some of the narratives in the motor city? You’ve got discredited mayor Kwame Kilpatrick as Lt. Pinkerton in "Madame Butterfly" leaving Detroit in the lurch. GM would be perfect as suicidal "Tosca," or evil "Don Giovanni." Ford is clearly "The Magic Flute" in this narrative… you could imagine Andre Chenier for Alan Mulally over at Ford but then he doesn’t climb the scaffold in the end.

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Why I Procrastinate

Wednesday, October 20, 2010

Procrastination, thy name is journalism.

In my case, procrastination is a series of behavior patterns that end up delaying important things getting done. It’s been proven again and again that for me, deadline pressure is the fuel that gets the engine to crank. Closer to the deadline, more fuel apparently. The orderly to-do list that looks completely efficient and rational on Monday morning, by Friday, is just some bizarre Magritte painting of an alternate reality. Schedules are better managed moment to moment in the real world. Things get pushed off because reality intervenes. Flexibility-nation not Procrasta-nation. I know which flag I wave.

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John Hockenberry Interviews Google CEO Eric Scmidt

Monday, October 18, 2010

The full interview of John Hockenberry's talk with Google CEO Eric Schmidt at the MIT Media Lab 25th Anniversary celebration.

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The Evolution of the MIT Media Lab

Friday, October 15, 2010

John is broadcasting from our partner station, WGBH, in Boston today. He's there to take part in the celebrations surrounding the 25th anniversary of the MIT Media Lab. 

Over the years a long list of new computer and digital technologies were developed there. Since then the lab has also become hugely prolific developer of medical technologies. Researchers at the lab have worked on projects as abstract as figuring out how to improve health care record keeping and as concrete as how to hybridize robotic technologies with prosthetics to improve the lives of veterans and civilians who've lost limbs.

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25 Years of the MIT Media Lab

Thursday, October 14, 2010

The MIT Media Lab turns 25 today. We take a look back at the novel idea behind this multidisciplinary academic lab that harnessed (and continues to harness) the creative energy of the digital revolution to develop major innovations in art and design, IT and mass communications. The display behind e-book readers such as the Kindle and Nook, the innovation behind the wildly popular "Guitar Hero" video games, and the "One Laptop Per Child" initiative all came from the Media Lab.

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Your Life History, Before You've Grown Up

Thursday, September 30, 2010

The both preposterous and completely unsurprising bio-flick, “Social Network,” about Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg’s both preposterous and completely unsurprising 21st century life, is both sociology and entertainment. Zuckerberg is 26 and the looming question has to be who cares about the biography of a 26-year-old? 

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My Symbols of Class

Thursday, September 30, 2010

It’s taken me a while to get around to writing this because, as the listener comments and pictures about the symbols of being (or not being) in the middle class have proliferated, I have thought more about how much of a big deal this was in my childhood back in the ancient 60s. As a little kid, I was constantly comparing myself with my neighbor kid pals to see who was ahead of whom in the inevitable pecking order of the American post-war economy.

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Comparing Middle Classes in Europe and America

Sunday, September 26, 2010

America invented the middle class. Europe invented the working class. The differences explain practically everything about why politics in America barely resembles politics and parties across the Atlantic.

The industrial revolutions in Europe took place against a background of the aristocratic traditions of class, rank, and royalty.  The growing wealth of the working classes produced a constituency allied against the upper ranks. The working class did not wish to be merely included in some political food-chain along with the aristocracy: It competed with the vestiges of royalty for political power. Aristocratic politics were expressed in the language of the Tories. The working classes were the Labor party or the socialists and communists.

 

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Lingering Questions about the Oil Spill

Monday, September 20, 2010

So after months of hyperbole and the worst kind of gloom and doom from everyone associated with the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, it's suddenly over.

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Down Syndrome in My Family

Monday, September 20, 2010

This July a joyous event took place at our home. A family reunion of my wife’s siblings, cousins and aunts and uncles all gathered together in rural Massachusetts. We never see this gang all together. There was a fabulous wedding down in Costa Rica a few years back and everyone had quite an adventure on Tamarindo beach. There have been other occasional affairs but with schedules what they are and people living far apart (one cousin has a wife in China who is waiting for a U.S. visa but that’s another story) and different family arrangements all around getting a family reunion scheduled is a big challenge. I’ve given up trying for my side of the family. But there is one thing that binds us together. This year’s reunion was all about celebrating the 45th birthday of Lisa Blatz the oldest child in my wife’s uncle’s family. Don’t worry about the details. Lisa was born with Down’s syndrome 45 years ago. It was a shock to the family that I will not even begin to characterize because 45 years later Lisa is the glue for this entire family. If she calls a birthday party everyone shows up. She keeps track of everyone. She remembers everyone’s birthday. During last summer’s birthday party/reunion there were few dry eyes. When people weren’t sobbing with gratitude over what Lisa has brought to the family they were just busy having fun and enjoying everyone’s company.

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Castles Made of Sand: Remembering Jimi Hendrix

Friday, September 17, 2010

40 years since the death of Jimi Hendrix. It’s really astounding to imagine that he’s been gone that long. It’s not surprising that Hendrix’s music lives on. Hendrix created the whole Fender Stratocaster power chord distortion mystique for the electric guitar. He made magic. He mesmerized audiences. He died young. His narrative is the allegory of the mid 20th century where a curtain came down hard on a show that seemed to be just getting started.

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Northern Cities, Shaped by the Great Migration

Wednesday, September 15, 2010

The great migration is not a part of my family experience. Our white ancestors landed in the Northeast, one of my relatives on my mother’s side was one of the first Dutch settlers in New York, and they stayed in the Northeast. After the original migration from places in Europe my gang stayed put.

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The Language of Language

Wednesday, September 08, 2010

The blues are blue and when you get the blues you feel blue but listening to Blind Lemon

Jefferson does not immediately inspire a trip to the Cote ‘d’Azur. The ideas of blue for English speakers, for American English speakers, for French and Spanish speakers are certainly all different.

But what about the color blue? Is the blue sky over Nice and Barcelona the same color as the smoky azure in some Southside Chicago blues bar?

It’s impossible to know what happens inside the brain in this way but thinking about how brains are changed by the languages their owners speak. Got me thinking about how isolated I’ve always felt as a mono-lingual English speaking American who has a smattering of Latin, German and Spanish lying dormant inside his skull.

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When I First Met Spock

Friday, September 03, 2010

Back in high school when I was utterly clueless about what I might do for a living I thought about being an actor. I had done numerous plays in the local community theatre in Western Michigan, where I went to high school. I was the lead in our high school musical. I played a Greek guy, Zorba the Greek, in fact, in the Kander and Ebb show, "Zorba." The opening song from that show was “Life is…” The first line, “Life is what you do while you’re waiting to die,” is a compelling, if questionable concept for a kid in high school thinking about what he might do when he grows up.

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On Parenting and Andre Agassi

Thursday, September 02, 2010

Andre Agassi talked to us this morning, and while I generally have little or no interest in what memoir-hawking celebrities have to say, he talked about something that surprised me. Yes, his life story is all about his tough father and the agony of being a tennis prodigy urged on by an ambitious parent. He told a great story about how his dad put 9-year-old Andre up to a game against sports legend Jim Brown years ago on a ten thousand dollar bet, the family’s life savings.  

I asked Agassi whether the frustration over his own life has parallels with grown up golf prodigy Tiger Wood’s current struggles. Agassi guardedly said that he understood how living in a bubble created by stardom can lead to bad choices. Then a few moments later, while talking about the boarding school he created in his hometown of Las Vegas, he said that the most important thing in life is choices. “Education is about choices,” Andre Agassi told us and he openly wished he had made more conscious choices in his own life. It made me think about my goals as a parent.

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President Obama Goes Country

Wednesday, September 01, 2010

It was spooky.

I listened to President Obama's speech from the Oval Office and it seemed less like an announcement of an important historical moment (the ending of combat operations in Iraq) than a laundry list of stuff we all know is going on. We all know the war is over yet there are still 50 thousand troops in Iraq. We all know there is a surge of fighting in Afghanistan, and we know that the economy is still in trouble. The president sounded like someone who had just sworn off some questionable behavior, trying to turn the page knowing that he'll be living the consequences of his past actions for some time to come. Or maybe it was like the lament of some heartbroken soul watching another relationship go down the tubes hoping for the best next time around. In short, the speech had the zinging, upbeat, optimism of say, a Hank Williams country tune.

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