Streams

Jim O'Grady

Jim O'Grady appears in the following:

Driver, Fleeing Police, Kills Child In New York

Tuesday, June 04, 2013

WNYC

A 17-year-old boy is under arrest, charged with manslaughter, after the car he was driving struck and killed a girl and injured her grandmother on the Upper West Side. The crash occurred on Wednesday morning in a residential neighborhood at a time when many children were walking to school.

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Room Service To End At Midtown Hilton

Monday, June 03, 2013

WNYC

The Hilton Hotel in Midtown Manhattan will stop offering room service in August - which means more than a loss of eggs at 1 a.m.

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With A Line Service Restored, NYC Subway Is Whole Again

Thursday, May 30, 2013

WNYC

The A train is back in the Rockaways after Storm Sandy knocked it out for seven months. With its return, the last empty space on the subway map has been restored, post-flood.

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More Moms Than Ever Earn More Than Dad

Wednesday, May 29, 2013

WNYC

A new Pew study found that a record 40 percent of households with children are relying on mom to be the breadwinner. That's up from 11 percent in 1960. The study says the change is being driven by more women in the workplace.

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Bernie Kerik, Disgraced Ex-Commish, Leaves Prison

Tuesday, May 28, 2013

WNYC

Bernard Kerik arrived home Tuesday in Franklin Lakes, N.J., after serving a three-year stint in a Maryland prison.

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The Jersey Shore On Memorial Day: Scarred But Open For Business

Sunday, May 26, 2013

WNYC

This Memorial Day weekend is when many beach-goers have been getting their first glimpses of the Jersey Shore since Sandy. In Asbury Park, it's a mixed scene: boarded-up shops next to bustling restaurants serving brunch crowds under umbrellas in the sun. (See slide show below.)

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Lack Of Investment By CT Makes It Harder To Recover From Derailment

Monday, May 20, 2013

WNYC

The state of Connecticut has been scrambling for a decade to make up for years of failing to invest in Metro-North Railroad. That's part of why the railroad has been finding it so hard to get service up and running on the New Haven Line after Friday's derailment.

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After Sandy, Homeowner Asks What Next?

Friday, May 17, 2013

WNYC

VIDEO. The latest on Stephen Drimalas, the Staten Islander in Ocean Breeze whose ups and downs we've been following since Sandy swamped his home, nearly drove him from New York, and left him wondering about his future.

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New York's MTA Takes First Steps Toward Hardening Subway Against Future Storms

Thursday, May 16, 2013

WNYC

Here's part of the MTA's problem in post-Sandy world: six subway stations are located in the Lower Manhattan flood zone, and those stations have 540 openings -- manholes, stairways, elevators, hatches and vents -- that could allow water to flow underground. As the authority prepares for future storms, it needs to figure out how to secure each one of those openings.

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Driving Is Dropping In The U.S.

Tuesday, May 14, 2013

WNYC

America's "driving boom" is over. So says a study by U.S. Public Interest Group, which found that after six decades of steady increases in drivership, the trend has reversed.

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Coders Hunker In Brooklyn Bunker To Come Up With The Next Great MTA App

Sunday, May 05, 2013

WNYC

UPDATE May 6: 05 p.m.: See below for a bit more detail on the winners with links.

About 300 software developers spent the weekend together in a large room on the NYU-Polytechnic campus in downtown Brooklyn, all competing for three prizes in an MTA app contest.

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In Staten Island, a Post-Sandy Rumor Mill

Friday, May 03, 2013

WNYC

The information that owners of Sandy-damaged homes need to make decisions is at least a month from being released. As they wait, the rumors circulate.

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NYC Subway Delays Up Last Year, Even Before Sandy

Wednesday, May 01, 2013

WNYC

Storm Sandy caused an almost 30 percent increase in subway delays during the first three months of 2013. That expected finding comes from a Straphangers Campaign study of electronic alerts by the New York MTA. But the study also found that the problems weren't just storm-related: subway delays were up by 10 percent last year in the ten months before Sandy.

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MAP: Where the (Subway) Wi-Fi Is

Thursday, April 25, 2013

Wi-Fi and cell phone service is now available at thirty-six New York City subway stations. Where, you ask? Read on.

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NY MTA Ponders How To Spend An Extra $40 Million

Monday, April 22, 2013

WNYC

The NY MTA is deciding all the time how to spend the discretionary part of its budget. But rarely is that budget unexpectedly enriched by an extra $40 million, which occurred last month when Albany bestowed that much more than requested in state funds. Now the debate begins on how to spend it.

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Poll: Most NY Metro Residents Like Where They Live, But Worry About Climate Change

Thursday, April 18, 2013

WNYC

Optimism is up in the New York Metropolitan region, led by a surge of good feelings among New York City residents. That's according to a new poll by the Regional Plan Association, which also found that worry is on the rise over climate change and severe weather threats.

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After Boston, NY and NJ Transit On Heightened Alert

Wednesday, April 17, 2013

WNYC

In the wake of the Boston bombings, transit systems around New York and New Jersey are beefing up security.   It's part reassurance, part having "more eyes and ears -- and in the case of police dogs -- noses out there," says an MTA spokesman.

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Transport Workers, Needing to Bargain With NY MTA Chair Prendergast, Open With Praise

Friday, April 12, 2013

Now that the NY MTA has a new chairman in Tom Prendergast, and Local Transport Workers Union 100 has a recently re-elected president in John Samuelsen, the two sides can now sit down hammer out a contract.

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Quinn's Transit Vision: Long on Buses, Ferries, Short on Bike Share

Thursday, April 11, 2013

New York City Council speaker Christine Quinn gave voters their first detailed glimpse into what her transportation agenda would be if she's elected Mayor. It's like Bloomberg's -- but without the big, bold visions.

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Feds Set Uniform Standards For Sandy Rebuilding

Thursday, April 04, 2013

U.S. Housing Secretary Shaun Donovan and U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood came to the Meadowlands of NJ to announce new post-Sandy rebuilding regulations. (photo by Jim O'Grady)

(New York, NY - WNYC) Build higher. That's what the federal government is saying to the owners of structures badly damaged by Sandy. Northeast flood zones now have tougher re-building requirements that apply across the board: to houses, businesses and government infrastructure.

Housing Secretary Shaun Donovan and Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood stood in front of an Amtrak electrical station in a New Jersey swamp to make their point: any structure more than half destroyed by Sandy that is being rebuilt with federal funds, must be lifted higher than before. The new standards require a building owner to consult an updated FEMA flood map, find the new recommended height for his structure and then lift it a foot above that.

LaHood explained why: "So that people don't have to go through the same heartache and headache and backache that it's taken to rebuild."

LaHood says the Amtrak electrical plant, which was knocked out by Sandy, will be lifted several feet at a cost of $25 million. A statement from the Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force has details on the new standards:

WASHINGTON – Today, the Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force announced that all Sandy-related rebuilding projects funded by the supplemental spending bill must meet a single uniform flood risk reduction standard. The standard, which is informed by the best science and best practices including assessments taken following Hurricane Sandy and brings the federal standard into alignment with many state and local standards already in place, takes into account the increased risk the region is facing from extreme weather events, sea level rise and other impacts of climate change and applies to the rebuilding of structures that were substantially damaged and will be repaired or rebuilt with federal funding. As a result, the new standard will require residential, commercial, or infrastructure projects that are applying for federal dollars to account for increased flood risk resulting from a variety of factors by elevating or otherwise flood-proofing to one foot above the elevation recommended by the most recent available federal flood guidance.

 This is the same standard that many communities in the region, including the entire state of New Jersey, have already adopted – meaning federally funded rebuilding projects in the impacted region often already must comply with this standard.  In fact, some communities require rebuilding higher than this minimum standard and if they do so, that stricter standard would supersede this standard as the minimum requirement.

 “Communities across the region are taking steps to address the risks posed by climate change and the Federal Government needs to be a partner in that effort by setting a single clear standard for how federal funds will be used in rebuilding,” said Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan, who also chairs the Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force. “Providing this guaranteed minimum level of protection will help us safeguard our investment and, more importantly, will help communities ensure they are better able to withstand future storms.”

 “President Obama has called on us to invest in our nation’s infrastructure—and that includes ensuring that our transit systems, roads, rails and bridges are built to last,” said Transportation Secretary LaHood, who joined Secretary Donovan in making the announcement in New Jersey today. “The flood risk reduction standard is a common sense guideline that will save money over the long-term and ensure that our transportation systems are more resilient for the future.”

 Today’s announcement does not retroactively affect federal aid that has previously been given to property owners and communities in the Sandy-impacted areas.  It also does not impact insurance rates under the National Flood Insurance Program, which is administered by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Moving forward the federal standard applies to substantial rebuilding projects (i.e. when damage exceeds 50 percent of the value of the structure) that will rely on federal funding.

 The specific steps that these types of structures will need to take include:

  • Elevating – the standard would require structures to elevate their bottom floor one foot higher than the most recent flood risk guidance provided by FEMA; and/or
  • Flood-proofing – in situations where elevation is not possible, the standard will require structures to prepare for flooding a foot higher than the most recent flood risk guidance provided by FEMA – for example, by relocating or sealing boilers or other utilities located below the standard elevation

These additional steps are intended to protect communities from future risk and to protect taxpayer investments over the long term. 

The programs which received funding in the supplemental bill and will be impacted by this standard include:

-          HUD: Community Development Block Grant Disaster Recovery program

-          HHS: Construction and reconstruction projects funded by Social Services Block Grants and Head Start

-          FEMA: Hazard Mitigation Grant Program and the Public Assistance Program

-          EPA: The State Revolving Fund (SRF) programs

-          DOT: Federal Transit Administration's Emergency Relief Program, as well as some Federal Railroad Administration and Federal Highway Administration projects

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