Streams

Jim Colgan

Jim Colgan appears in the following:

What are you doing right now?

Friday, April 10, 2009

Today the Takeaway is asking, "What are you doing right now and what's on your mind?" When we asked a similar question last week we got hundreds of responses. But some people said they didn’t care. One of those listeners, Christine from Brooklyn, talks to another listener, Richard from Hazel Park, MI, who tells us why he took part and why he wants to hear other listeners "check in".

Read Jim Colgan's Producer's Note on the fun of playing with the radio and check out Buzzfeed.com Senior Editor Scott Lamb's post on the absurd of satisfaction of playing Foursquare.

And to listen to our segment on the new iPhone app, Foursquare, and the fun it inspired, click here.
Related:
Where you at? Foursquare maps it out
Playing with radio: Behind the scenes of The Takeaway's "Where are you?" game
The absurd satisfaction of playing foursquare
The thrill of checking in with our listeners

Comment

Dooce blogger Heather B. Armstrong explains it all (to her kid that is)

Wednesday, April 08, 2009

Dooce blogger Heather B. Armstrong earns a living revealing personal details — an act that actually got her fired from her job as a web designer seven years ago. Since then she's made a reputation for brutal (and often hilarious) honesty and openness. Her new book, It Sucked and Then I Cried: How I had a Baby, a Breakdown, and a Much Needed Margarita documents her post-partum depression and self-admission to a mental health facility. Not something many parents would be willing to put in hard copy. But you don’t have to be famous to have your personal details on the internet these days. So how do you shield your children from information you don't think they should know? And how much is okay to tell them? Heather B. Armstrong looks at how we decide where to draw the line.

Click through for the transcript

How much do you tell your children? What did your parents over-share with you? Tell us here.

Comment

The Netherlands confronts Muslim tensions

Tuesday, April 07, 2009

If Turkey succeeds in its bid to join the European Union, it would become the most populous state in the EU. But European countries are divided over the issue of allowing a predominantly Muslim country gain such a powerful role. Nowhere is the debate over this more heated than in the Netherlands, where an increasing Muslim population has caused a populist backlash and a string of high profile murders in recent years. We talk to the Dutch Minister for European Affairs, Frans Timmermans, who is in the U.S. to promote the economic benefits of tolerance.

"America is back. And we're so happy that America is back, and we want to build our future coordination with the Americans because only with them we can solve the big problems we're facing."
—Frans Timmermans, Dutch minister of European affairs, on America's meeting with Turkey

This 2008 news report from Russia Today documents the increasing divide over the growth of Islamic communities in The Netherlands.

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Where you at? Foursquare maps it out

Friday, April 03, 2009

There’s a new web tool that’s getting a lot of buzz right now called Foursquare. It's a program that encourages you to “check in” with the system whenever you go to an interesting – or mundane! – place with your cell phone. This sends an alert to your friends telling them where you are and what you are doing. It may sound like that other tool that is hogging the news feed these days – Twitter – but it’s not. There are no pithy comments or creativity required. You just passively check in and all your friends find out. But our friend and blogger, Scott Lamb, thinks this simple act of finding out what people are doing also makes the world a better place. He is the senior editor at Buzzfeed and he joins us to discuss this new trend.

For more, read Scott Lamb's blog post, The absurd satisfaction of playing Foursquare.
Related:
The absurd satisfaction of playing foursquare
Playing with radio: Behind the scenes of The Takeaway's "Where are you?" game
What are you doing right now?
The thrill of checking in with our listeners

Comments [2]

Film shows life, death of Irish hunger striker Bobby Sands

Friday, March 20, 2009

Back in 1981, in the United Kingdom, a group of men from the Irish Republican Army made headlines. They were imprisoned in a British jail in Belfast, Ireland. They said they were political prisoners. Margaret Thatcher said otherwise.The award-winning film "Hunger" tracks the last six weeks in the life of Irish hunger striker Bobby Sands. Sands starved himself to death at the age of 27, in a brutal Belfast prison called The Maze. His death raises questions about out notions of martyrdom and fanaticism. The Takeaway is joined by visual artist Steven McQueen, who directed the film.

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The Pope continues his African tour

Friday, March 20, 2009

Pope Benedict is continuing his first trip through Africa as Pontiff. He's arriving in Angola right now and, as more than half of Angolans are Catholic, the excitement is high. Searching for hope, peace, and glimpse of the Pope, Angolans are flooding the streets of Luanda, where BBC correspondent Louise Redvers is right now.

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Caring for the least of us: The ethics of health care reform

Tuesday, February 24, 2009

President Obama will move to tackle health care next week and he is expected to touch on the subject in his address to Congress tonight. He announced Monday that he will convene a summit to discuss what some call America’s health care crisis. Our guest calls it an ethical crisis. The Takeaway talks to Arthur Caplan, Chair of the Department of Medical Ethics at the University of Pennsylvania.

For more of The Takeaway's coverage of health care in this country, click here and to listen to what the experts think President Obama needs to know about health care check out our Briefing Book series.

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And the winner is...Your six-word mottos for the state of the states

Tuesday, February 24, 2009

Takeaway Contributor Stephen Dubner, who co-authors the Freakonomics book and blog, asked his readers to come up with a six-word motto for the United States. Our listeners joined in the fun and now Stephen is here to announce the winner of our poll.

Want to see the poll results for yourself? Click here!

"The American history of mottos is murky. We have a bunch of them: 'E Pluribus Unum,' 'United We Stand, Divided We Fall,' 'One Nation Under God.' But they're not really in use that much."
— "Freakonomics" author Stephen Dubner on a new motto for the country

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New family in the neighborhood: The Obamas and Washington, D.C.

Wednesday, February 04, 2009

The election of Barack Obama brought, for the first time, a black family to the White House. But more than that: there’s a new black family in the neighborhood. Long a haven of ambition, achievement, community and art, Washington D.C.’s black community hasn’t always had an easy relationship with the White House. To take a look at how the new residents at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue might interact with D.C.’s black community we are joined by Patrik Henry Bass, Books Editor at Essence Magazine and author of Like a Mighty Stream: The March on Washington, August 28, 1963.

The photographer Patrik Henry Bass mentioned? Addison Scurlock. And the National Museum of American History has an impressive online archive of his work.

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Gov. Paterson to name Kirsten Gillibrand to U.S. Senate

Friday, January 23, 2009

Just a few hours ago, New York Governor David Paterson picked Rep. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y. for Hillary Clinton's now-vacant Senate seat. The governor will formally announce his pick today at noon in Albany. According to the New York Times an aide to Rep. Gillibrand confirmed that she had accepted the appointment. Here to tell us more about the Senate's newest member is Liz Benjamin, a reporter for the New York Daily News.

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Irritating English phrases

Tuesday, November 25, 2008

At this moment in time, we’re going to interface with someone who will hopefully tell us why words adversely impact so many people. Are we annoying you yet? Jeremy Butterfield might know why. He’s the author of a new book called "A Damp Squid: The English Language Laid Bare," which features the most annoying words and phrases in the English language

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Amity Shlaes on separating bank and state

Wednesday, November 19, 2008

"From the beginning, the arbitrary aspect of the of the Treasury bailout has frightened a lot of observers."
--Amity Shlaes on the economic crisis

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A formula for measuring spin in the presidential debates

Monday, September 29, 2008

Politicians are masters at spinning their words to boost their appeal. Which candidate in this year’s presidential election uses the most spin? The Takeaway talks to David Skillicorn, a computer science professor Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada.

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Obama rises from the land of Lincoln’s splintered house

Monday, August 25, 2008

A focal point at tonight’s Democratic National Convention will be the delegation from the Illinois Democratic Party, a delegation that is infamous for its inability to cooperate. What is the story behind the fractious party in which Barack Obama cut his political teeth, and how has it taught him to be a presidential nominee?

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Whose convention is it anyway?

Monday, August 25, 2008

At most political conventions, the delegates usually line up behind the one candidate. But half the delegates Takeaway Political Director Andrea Bernstein spoke to say still they’re for Hillary Clinton. The votes will end up going to Obama, but Bernstein looks at how their level of support for Clinton will affect Obama’s campaign beyond the convention.

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Two’s company: How Obama will fare with Biden

Monday, August 25, 2008

The missing piece of the Democratic convention is now revealed with Joe Biden as Obama’s running mate. Biden’s choice helps Obama roll out the narrative of his life to a population that has yet to fully get to know him. The Takeaway goes live to Denver where Political Director Andrea Bernstein looks at the implications of the VP choice and how it will play out in the convention.

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The digital frontlines in the Georgia conflict

Monday, August 11, 2008

Guest: Bill Woodcock, research director for Packet Clearing House, a non-profit group that advises Internet companies and governments about cyber attacks.

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A sad Sunday for soul fans: Isaac Hayes dies at 65

Monday, August 11, 2008

Isaac Hayes took the sound of Memphis around the world before dying Sunday at age 65. It was a sad day for soul fans and the end of a pioneering career.

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Marrying for luck on 8/8/08

Friday, August 08, 2008

The Beijing Olympics start on an auspicious date in Chinese culture, but it’s not the only event happening on 8/8/8 for superstitious reasons. Thousands of Chinese Americans have picked this day to get married in the hope it’ll bring them luck. The Takeaway speaks to one couple who fought hard for event space on a day of big demand for weddings.

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The pop songs of the Olympics

Thursday, August 07, 2008

Before the 1980s, the only music you heard during the Olympics was the ceremonial sounds of a marching band. Nowadays, there are at least a dozen pop songs associated with each year’s games. The Takeaway looks at the origin of Olympic "anthems” from Strauss to Freddie Mercury to Jackie Chan.

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