Streams

Jillian Weinberger

Jillian Weinberger appears in the following:

Fact-Checking the Foreign Policy Debate

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

In 2008, foreign policy was widely considered then-Senator Barack Obama weakness, but, by 2012, the death of Osama bin Laden and the end of the Iraq War had turned the tied. So how did the president compare to Governor Mitt Romney in last night's debate? Kurt Volker, former U.S. Ambassador to NATO and Executive Director of the McCain Institute for International Leadership, explains.

McCain Institute for International Leadership

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A Climate of Doubt

Monday, October 22, 2012

Just a few years ago, climate change was widely considered an inconvenient truth — something that would likely be expensive and difficult to fix, but an issue that nearly all politicians felt compelled to reckon with. But in 2012, climate change has all but evaporated as a political issue. Bill McKibben, environmentalist and author, explains why.

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Obama and Romney Prepare for Debate in Boca Raton, Epicenter of Financial Crisis

Monday, October 22, 2012

In 1994, a group of young J.P. Morgan bankers met for a weekend retreat in the South Florida city of Boca Raton, a fateful trip during which the bankers first conceived of credit derivatives, a creative financial tool that helped hasten the recession. President Obama and Governor Romney debate in Boca Raton today. Financial Times editor Gillian Tett explores the beginning of the financial crisis.

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Rare Elections in Palestinian West Bank Highlight All-Female Ticket

Friday, October 19, 2012

Tomorrow the West Bank will hold the first Palestinian elections in six years. How might these elections change life for West Bank residents? Jodi Rudoren, Jerusalem bureau chief for our partner The New York Times, explains.

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Negative Campaigns and Big Money: Election Season in the Ancient World

Thursday, October 18, 2012

Attack ads have become part and parcel of the modern political process, but it turns out negative campaigning has a much longer history, one that began centuries ago. Ellen Millender, professor of classics and humanities at Reed College explains why Greek and Roman politicians might feel at home in modern Washington. 

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Princeton's First Female President Shirley Tilghman Stepping Down

Wednesday, October 17, 2012

After 11 years in the job Shirley Tilghman, Princeton University’s first female president, will be stepping down at the end of the academic year. What does she consider her biggest accomplishment?

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Is Manufacturing the Key to Innovation?

Tuesday, October 16, 2012

The revival of American manufacturing has been a constant refrain in presidential campaigns, and 2012 is no exception. But does American manufacturing have a future? In a new book, "Producing Prosperity: Why America Needs a Manufacturing Renaissance," Harvard Business School professors Gary Pisano and Willy Shih argue that it must — and that manufacturing is the key to American innovation.

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Candidates Request No Follow-Ups in Town-Hall Style Debate

Tuesday, October 16, 2012

As the candidates prepare to face off again tonight in the second presidential debate, there is actually something the two men finally agree on: the format. Tonight's debate at Hofstra University is town-hall style, meaning all questions come from the audience. The campaigns have also agreed that the moderator, Candy Crowley, will not be allowed ask follow-up questions.

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'Mad Men' Creator Matthew Weiner on Writing the Cuban Missile Crisis

Friday, October 12, 2012

Set in the 1960s, the AMC series "Mad Men," created by Matthew Weiner, documents the dramas of that turbulent decade through the personal, everyday lives of its characters. October 14, 2012 marks the fiftieth anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis, a historical event that serves as the backdrop to Mad Men's season two finale, "Meditations in an Emergency," which Weiner co-wrote and directed.

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Civil Rights, the Courts, and Public Opinion: The Case of Gay Marriage

Thursday, October 11, 2012

While Supreme Court decisions like Brown v. Board of Education can change the course of American history, they can also engender serious political backlash. Is litigation the best way to secure rights for minority groups?

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Supreme Court Could Overturn Affirmative Action

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

On June 23, 2003, the Supreme Court upheld the affirmative action policy at the University of Michigan Law School. Today, just nine years after Justice O'Connor issued the Court's decision in Grutter, the Supreme Court will hear Fisher v. University of Texas, Austin, a case that has the potential to overturn affirmative action in higher education.

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Lake County Ohio: Voters Discuss The Presidential Election

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

All this week, we've been hearing from a panel of seven voters in Lake County, Ohio. The Takeaway’s host John Hockenberry spent time there over the weekend to get a better sense of what matters to the people in this swing county, in the crucial swing state of Ohio.

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Seven Ohio Voters: From Liberal to Conservative and Everything in Between

Tuesday, October 09, 2012

All week, The Takeaway is speaking with voters from a swing county a crucial swing state: Lake County, Ohio. From liberal to conservative, from a 21-year-old student to a 79-year-old great-grandfather, The Takeaway's seven Lake County voters represented a diverse group.

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The Seven Ohio Voters Who Will Determine the Election

Monday, October 08, 2012

Lake County, Ohio has become a good determiner of the way that the swing state will vote, and thus, is also a fairly good predictor of presidential elections. Seven voters coming from different backgrounds, and bringing very different concerns to the table, discuss what's swaying them.

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Small Business Owners React to Jobs Report

Friday, October 05, 2012

The recently-released ADP September jobs report showed modest growth in the job market. While all of this will certainly be hailed as positive results from the Democrats, Republicans and other detractors will be quick to point out that job growth has been significantly less than what was expected.

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The United Nations and the Syrian Conflict

Wednesday, October 03, 2012

After 18 months, and over 20,000 dead, there's still no end in sight for Syria. Martin Nesirky, spokesperson for U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon, explains the U.N.'s strategy going forward.

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From Native Americans to the ADA: A History of Disabilities in the United States

Tuesday, October 02, 2012

Americans living with disabilities have a long and varied history in this country, as demonstrated in "A Disability History of the United States," a new book by Kim E. Nielsen, professor of history and disability studies at the University of Toledo. Professor Nielson examines this history from a cultural standpoint, as perceptions of disabilities changed dramatically when Europeans colonized the Americas, and as the country moved toward urbanization and industrialization in the 19th century. 

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Art.sy: The 'Pandora' of the Art World

Tuesday, October 02, 2012

Fine art is one of the last mediums to resist the digital pull. We buy music, shoes, books, and anything else we want online, but art has remained a world apart. Carter Cleveland and Sebastian Cwilich, the developers of Art.sy, aim to change that.

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Nate Silver on the Science of Prediction

Monday, October 01, 2012

Political junkies, economists, baseball scouts, meteorologists, and basically everyone else in the world is constantly trying to predict the future. And yet with the overwhelming amount of data that came with the information age, forecasters are often wrong — if not completely shocked — by the results.

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Affirmative Action to Warrantless Wiretapping: The Upcoming Supreme Court Term

Monday, October 01, 2012

The Supreme Court begins its 2012-2012 term today, just months after announcing its decision on the Affordable Care Act. While the Court has announced only half of the cases it will hear over the next nine months, Jeffrey Rosen, professor of law at George Washington University, explains that the Justices already have a number of contentious issues on the calendar.

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