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Jillian Weinberger

Jillian Weinberger appears in the following:

Egyptian-Americans Weigh in on Nation's New Chapter

Thursday, July 04, 2013

For Egyptian-Americans, the definitions and ideas of freedom and independence are being tested as Egypt embarks on a new chapter. To reflect on this future, The Takeaway welcomes three Egyptian-Americans. Nancy Yousef is a professor of English at Baruch College. Sarah McGowan is an Egyptian-American who was born and raised in Dayton, Ohio, and Ahmed Soliman is a 37-year-old Egyptian-American attorney born in New York.

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Protests Continue in Egypt As Demands Grow for Morsi to Step Down

Tuesday, July 02, 2013

After millions took to the streets on Sunday, protests continue in Egypt where hundreds of thousands continue to demand the ouster of the democratically elected President Mohamed Morsi. Omar Khalifa is the director of Egypt’s O Media and was skeptical of President Morsi’s regime from the beginning. He's been participating in the protests in Egypt that he says are overwhelming in scale. Khalifa joins The Takeaway to discuss the protests and the possible next steps in Egypt.

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The Battle of Gettysburg, 150 Years Later

Monday, July 01, 2013

When Union and Confederate soldiers clashed at the Battle of Gettysburg, 150 years ago today, The Saturday Evening Post sent reporters to cover the fighting. Today, the Post is one of the few remaining publications that covered the Civil War, as the magazine began printing in 1821. Jeff Nilsson, director of archives for The Saturday Evening Post, remembers the battle and its legacy.

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President Obama's Trip to Africa Draws Protesters

Friday, June 28, 2013

President Obama heads to Senegal, South Africa and Tanzania this week for a trip that will focus on trade and investment relations. But not everyone in these countries is excited about his trip.  Lerato Mbele is a South African journalist and co-host of BBC's Newsday. She reports from Johannesburg on President Obama's mixed reception and how it compares to the "Obamania" of 5 years ago.

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Supreme Court Strikes Down Defense of Marriage Act, Rules on Prop. 8

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

In a landmark decision, the United States Supreme Court has struck down the U.S. Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) on the grounds that it violates the equal protection clause. The ruling says same-sex spouses are entitled to the same federal benefits and protections as opposite-sex couples. The case, United States Vs. Windsor, invalidates the act with a 5-4 decision. "DOMA’s principal effect is to identify a subset of state-sanctioned marriages and make them unequal," writes Justice Anthony Kennedy in the majority opinion.

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Texas Abortion Bill Fails to Pass After Filibuster

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

Around midnight last night, the Texas Senate shutdown Senator Wendy Davis's (D-Fort Worth) nearly 11 hour filibuster meant to prevent the passage of Senate Bill 5, a restrictive abortion law. Christy Hoppe, Austin bureau chief for the Dallas Morning News, was present for entire filibuster. James Henson is the director of the Texas politics project as the University of Texas.

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'The New Black': Same-Sex Marriage and the African-American Community

Tuesday, June 25, 2013

The Supreme Court will soon issue its decisions in the two same-sex marriage cases the Justices heard this term, but same-sex marriage has long divided the African-American community, a fact filmmaker Yoruba Richen explores in her new documentary, "The New Black." She joins us today to discuss her film that examines the history and future of same-sex marriage in the black community and the black church.

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Supreme Court Strikes Down Key Provision of Voting Rights Act

Tuesday, June 25, 2013

In a 5-4 decision, the United States Supreme Court issued a ruling on Tuesday that strikes down key parts of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Section 4 was struck down, which had established a formula to identify states that may require extra scrutiny by the federal government and Justice Department when it comes to changing its voting laws.

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'Miss You Can Do It': A Pageant Inspires Young Women with Disabilities

Monday, June 24, 2013

The Miss You Can Do It pageant gives girls with physical disabilities a chance to achieve and compete. Abbey Curran, a former Miss Iowa, was born with cerebral palsy and created the pageant in 2008. "Miss You Can Do It," the subject of a new HBO documentary, premieres tonight on HBO. John Hockenberry spoke with Curran at an HBO event last week.

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Miami Heat Wins NBA Championship

Friday, June 21, 2013

It's official: The Miami Heat basketball team has won back-to-back NBA Championship titles. Game 7 of the 18th NBA Finals was finished last night with the Heat winning 95-88 against the San Antonio Spurs. Joining us today to discuss the game is Joey Palacios, reporter for KSTX in San Antonio, and Tim Reynolds, sports writer for the Associated Press.

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MLK's Original 'I Have A Dream' Speech

Friday, June 21, 2013

We all know Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech. But it turns out August 1963 wasn't the first time that King delivered that speech. A few months earlier, on June 23, Dr. King led more than 100,000 people in a march through Detroit, where he gave his "I Have a Dream" speech for the first time. Journalist Tony Brown witnessed the original "Dream" speech, and Brown coordinated Dr. King’s 1963 Freedom Walk in Detroit.

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'Documented': Jose Antonio Vargas's Immigration Story

Friday, June 21, 2013

Jose Antonio Vargas arrived in the United States at the age of 12, but he didn't learn his about his undocumented status until he tried to get his driver's license at the age of 16. Since he revealed his status in a 2011 New York Times Magazine article, Vargas has become an immigration reform activist. He joins us today to discuss his latest project, "Documented," a new film that examines his own immigration story, from his childhood in the Philippines through today. 

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Examining the Protests In Brazil

Thursday, June 20, 2013

The protests in Brazil that initially began as a response to transportation fare increases have grown into a much larger movement, drawing thousands of Brazilians into the streets. Eliane Cantanhêde, a columnist for the newspaper Folha de São Paulo and TV commentator for Globo News em Pauta, joins us to discuss Brazil's economic disparities and the many ways this protest could play out.

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Actor James Gandolfini Dead at 51

Thursday, June 20, 2013

HBO's "The Sopranos" changed television, it changed the entertainment industry and actor James Gandolfini himself changed the character of the Italian-American made guy. Today we take a look back at the impact of Gandolfini's break through role in The Sopranos, and the cultural significance of the show in America. Chris Carley, co-owner of Holsten’s, the restaurant where the the last scene of The Sopranos was filmed, discusses the late actor.

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Special Senate Elections in New Jersey and Massachusetts

Wednesday, June 19, 2013

New Jersey Sen. Frank Lautenberg's death, and Massachusetts Sen. John Kerry’s move to Secretary of State, left two major vacancies in the Senate. Both states are looking to fill those seats with special elections in the next few months. R.D. Sahl, longtime Boston news anchor and Boston University journalism professor, and Sarah Gonzalez, northern New Jersey enterprise reporter for WNYC and NJPR, discuss the candidates.

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Transparency, Secrecy and Freedom: The History of Privacy and Democracy

Tuesday, June 18, 2013

As we learn more about the National Security Agency's secret surveillance programs and leaker Edward Snowden, The Takeaway is looking at freedom in America, and freedom's relationship to privacy. Jill Lepore, New Yorker staff writer and professor of American history at Harvard University, explores the relationship between privacy, government transparency and freedom in U.S. history.

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How Should the U.S. Help Syrian Rebels?

Monday, June 17, 2013

As President Obama meets with fellow G-8 leaders in Northern Ireland, Syria’s fate is high on the agenda, but there is little consensus on the best path forward. Former British ambassador Carne Ross is founder of Independent Diplomat, a non-profit diplomatic advisory group that is currently advising the Syrian Coalition. He outlines the Syrian rebels' position, and analyzes the potential issues in the international community.

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Major Companies Accused of Racial Discrimination

Thursday, June 13, 2013

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has brought two separate lawsuits against two major companies: discount retailer Dollar General and car-maker BMW. The E.E.O.C. alleges that these companies used criminal background checks to screen out workers who have a criminal record of any kind. The suits were brought under the Civil Rights Act, which prohibits discrimination against job seekers on the basis of race.

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Carl Hiaasen's Florida

Wednesday, June 12, 2013

Celebrated author, columnist for The Miami Herald, and born-and-raised Floridian Carl Hiaasen discusses his latest foray into fiction and the news form his home state, where the George Zimmerman trial is underway.

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Race and College Admissions: Desegregation and Affirmative Action

Tuesday, June 11, 2013

In the next few weeks, the Supreme Court will determine the fate of affirmative action in college admissions. Most Americans think of affirmative action as a post-Civil Rights Era phenomenon, but race has long played a role in college admissions. Fifty years ago today, Alabama Governor George Wallace made his final stand for segregation at the University of Alabama. That evening, in a landmark speech, President Kennedy called on Congress to pass comprehensive civil rights legislation.

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