Streams

Jillian Weinberger

Jillian Weinberger appears in the following:

Is there Hope for Middle East Peace in Obama's Second Term?

Thursday, March 21, 2013

In President Obama’s first term, amidst the Arab Spring and strong nuclear threats from Iran, the Arab-Israeli peace process seemed to get lost in the shuffle. Now Obama is making his first visit to Israel as president.

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Our 'Blindspot': Hidden Biases with Real-Life Consequences

Thursday, March 21, 2013

According to Anthony Greenwald, professor of psychology at the University of Washington, and Mahzarin Banaji, professor of social ethics at Harvard University, the vast majority of us have to work hard to counteract our biases because most of the stereotypes we hold are deeply ingrained.

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Does 'One Person, One Vote' Mean 'One Voter, One Vote'?

Wednesday, March 20, 2013

Next week the Supreme Court will decide whether to hear Lepak v. City of Irving, a case out of Texas that hinges on the question of whether "one person, one vote" means "one voter, one vote." As Richard Pildes, constitutional law professor at New York University, explains, Irving, Texas, is divided into six City Council districts, all equal in terms of population. One of the districts includes a significant immigrant population, however, rendering half of that district ineligible to vote. The eligible voters left therefore have more political power than those in the other districts.

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America's Changing Foreign Policy in the Middle East and Beyond

Tuesday, March 19, 2013

As President Obama prepares for his first trip to Israel since his election in 2008, BBC State Department correspondent Kim Ghattas describes the Administration's goals in the region and beyond. Ghattas has watched the Obama Administration's foreign policy goals unfold firsthand, as she traveled the world with former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, and she describes her experiences with Clinton in her new book, "The Secretary: A Journey with Hillary Clinton from Beirut to the Heart of American Power."

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No Marathon for Gaza After Hamas Bans Female Runners

Monday, March 18, 2013

 

The United Nations Relief and Work Agency has canceled the third annual Gaza marathon after Hamas, the controlling party in the region, banned women from the race. Journalist Nabila Ramdani planned to run the marathon scheduled for April 10.

 

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The Taco Bell Takeover

Thursday, March 14, 2013

In a significant game-changer in the fast food industry, Taco Bell recently outpaced some of its main competitors with the launch of Doritos Locos Tacos, selling roughly one million of these tacos a day last year.

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For New Pope, a Complex Association with Argentina's Dirty War

Thursday, March 14, 2013

The Catholic Church, including Pope Francis (then known as Jorge Bergolio), may have been complicit in the crimes perpetrated by the Argentina's military regime, which ruled from 1976-1983.

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Steubenville Rape Trial Divides Ohio Community

Wednesday, March 13, 2013

A rape case against two high school football players has rocked the town of Steubenville, Ohio, a small community of eighteen-thousand residents in the Ohio River Valley. The case goes to trial today.

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What the Developing World Can Teach Us about Economic Growth

Wednesday, March 13, 2013

Over the last few decades, while countries like China, Brazil and India have emerged as economic powerhouses , the United States and Europe are left wringing their hands over the debt crisis and the great recession.

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Taiye Selasi Examines the World of the Afropolitan in 'Ghana Must Go'

Tuesday, March 12, 2013

Author Taiye Selasi describes herself as an "Afropolitan," a member of a distinctly 21st century generation of African origin. The characters in her new novel, "Ghana Must Go," reflect this sentiment as well. 

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Conclave Convenes as One Billion Catholics Wonder What's Next

Tuesday, March 12, 2013

The world's 1.2 billion Catholics have a number of different visions for the future of the Church. Julie Davis, a graphic designer from Dallas and the author of the Happy Catholic blog, Brian Frawley, manager of the gift shop at Boston's Holy Cross Cathedral and Father Matthew Gamber, a priest and senior counselor at Jesuit High School in Tampa Bay, Florida, discuss their hopes for the future of the Church.

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Rethinking Prisons Through Digital Technology

Monday, March 11, 2013

Several states face the same problem when it comes to incarceration: severe overcrowding at a high cost. This weekend, a panel at the South by Southwest festival examined how prisons can use digital technology to ameliorate these issues.

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President Obama Pushes to Diversify Judiciary

Wednesday, March 06, 2013

In the past several months, President Obama has been making a quiet push to change the face of the nation's judicial system with a slow and steady stream of diverse nominees for federal courts.  In Florida, he's nominated the first openly gay black man to serve on federal district court.  In New York, he nominated the first Asian American lesbian. And in DC, he's nominated the first South Asian to sit on the US Court of Appeals.  Sherrilyn Ifill, President and Director-Counsel of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund explains what hurdles these candidates may face and what potential these nominations represent.

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'Gun Guys' Challenges the Stereotypes about Firearms and Those Who Love Them

Wednesday, March 06, 2013

The classic American "gun guy" is shotgun-toting John Wayne, riding his way through cowboy movies like "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon," "El Dorado," and "True Grit."  Author Dan Baum describes himself as more of a Woody Allen than a John Wayne, and yet he has loved guns since his first successful shoot at the age of five. Baum describes his unlikely passion for firearms in his new book, "Gun Guys: A Road Trip."

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Sequestration: Is Our Budget System Broken?

Tuesday, March 05, 2013

The United States is officially in the midst of the sequester. Lawrence White, a professor of economics at NYU's Stern School of Business, explains how sequestration will impact the economy, particularly unemployment and the markets.

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How the Voting Rights Act Came to Be

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

The Supreme Court is set to decide whether an important part of the Voting Rights Act is still necessary. Judy Richardson and Charles Cobb, both of whom fought for voting rights on the front lines, explain how the act came to be.

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Supreme Court Hears Challenge to Voting Rights Act

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

The Supreme Court hears arguments today in what could be a landmark Supreme Court ruling regarding the state of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. The act, first signed by President Lyndon B. Johnson, was a major piece of civil rights legislation aiming to reverse a practice that long disenfranchised black Americans.

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How Thomas Edison Illuminated Modern America

Tuesday, February 26, 2013

The 1893 Columbian Exposition introduced the United States as an industrial power on the world’s stage. As the exposition opened on May 1, 1893, President Grover Cleveland illuminated the fairgrounds with the push of a button, the first time most of the exposition's attendees had ever seen a light bulb.

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The Sequester Could Have a Devastating Impact on Scientific Research, Too

Monday, February 25, 2013

In addition to the Defense Department and other federal employees, the automatic spending cuts known as sequestration would also affect a number of other federally-funded projects, including scientific and medical research.

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The Rise and Fall of Jesse Jackson, Jr.

Thursday, February 21, 2013

Elected to Congress in 1995, Jesse Jackson Jr. served Illinois's second district for seventeen years until his resignation last November. Chicago-based political consultant Delmarie Cobb worked for both Jesse Jackson Jr. and Jesse Jackson Sr. in the 1980s and 1990s. 

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