Streams

Jillian Weinberger

Associate Producer

Jillian Weinberger appears in the following:

Actor Explains How He Portrayed Bin Laden in 'Zero Dark Thirty'

Thursday, January 24, 2013

Osama bin Laden first appeared on the FBI Most Wanted list in 1999. Following the September 11 terrorist attacks in 2001, every American knew his name, and he represented America's ultimate villain, and our number one target. In "Zero Dark Thirty," actor Ricky Sekhon had the challenge of playing Osama bin Laden.

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How Companies Should Regulate Employees on Social Media

Wednesday, January 23, 2013

A federal regulator has recently ruled, in a number of cases, that employees posting about wages, hours, and working conditions on social media is protected speech. Steven Kane, owner of a human resources consulting firm, explains the legal issues surrounding employee comments on social media, and how employers should handle these issues.

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An Israeli Musician Reflects on His Country’s Politics Through Song

Tuesday, January 22, 2013

Today is election day in Israel, the end of a contentious campaign season on fraught political territory. Israeli singer-songwriter Idan Raichel explores his country's politics through his music, and explains how he hopes to reach Israel's neighbors through song. 

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Second Inaugurals, from Lincoln to Obama

Monday, January 21, 2013

Today, as the president takes the oath of office once more, the palpable hope and excitement of Obama's first inauguration has waned. How will President Obama's second inaugural compare to his first, and how does it fit the history of second inaugurals, from Lincoln on forward? Historian and author Kenneth C. Davis explores the history of second inaugurals, and discusses the expectations for President Obama.

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One Student's Quest to Stop the Teaching of Creationism in Louisiana Schools

Monday, January 21, 2013

In 2008, Louisiana passed the Science Education Act, a law that allows schools to use supplemental materials when teaching evolution and global warming. Critics like activist Zack Kopplin argued that the law allows teachers to promote creationism.

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Facebook Unveils New Search Function

Wednesday, January 16, 2013

Facebook just unveiled its latest venture, a search tool called Graph. Patrick Moorhead, president and principal analyst of Moor Insights and Strategy, discusses the new function, and what it means for the future of search and social networking.

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A Malian in the United States Reflects on the War in His Homeland

Tuesday, January 15, 2013

Born and raised in Mali, Assoumane Maiga traveled to the United States as a Fulbright scholar in 2009. Upon his return, Maiga spoke out about humanitarian crises in his hometown of Timbuktu, and was soon imprisoned, without reason, by the Malian military. He has since been released.

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Rape Kits Mishandled at NYC Lab

Friday, January 11, 2013

The New York City Medical Examiner has announced that the office is reviewing more than 800 rape kits, cases were handled by a former lab technician who made a series of incorrect reports over the course of ten years, from 2001 to 2011. Lawrence Kobilinsky, forensic scientist and chair of the science department at John Jay College, discusses the science of DNA analysis. Erin Murphy, professor of at New York University School of Law, explains the legal issues at stake.

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Floods and Fraud: Congress Considers Sandy Aid

Friday, January 11, 2013

Residents of Coastal New York and New Jersey are still feeling the aftereffects of Sandy more than two months after the powerful storm. President Obama signed a $9.7 billion Sandy aid package last Sunday, and Congress will decide the fate of another $51 billion aid package next Tuesday. Bob Hennelly, contributing editor for politics and investigations for Takeaway co-producer WNYC, discusses the politics behind Sandy aid, and how victims are coping.

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Obama Lists Climate Change Among His Top Priorities for Second Term

Thursday, January 10, 2013

As President Obama moves into his second term, his policy priorities, and the policies themselves, will likely shift. Coral Davenport, energy and environment correspondent for the National Journal, explores the Obama Administration's priorities on climate change, and Elisabeth Bumiller, Pentagon correspondent for Takeaway partner The New York Times, discusses the Administration's policy shifts in Afghanistan.

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Should Criminals Who Are Still Dangerous Be Kept Locked Up?

Wednesday, January 09, 2013

In her reporting for The New Yorker, journalist Rachel Aviv follows subjects with complicated legal or medical problems, such as homeless LGBT runaways living with HIV, or whether teenagers who commit heinous crimes should be given life sentences. Aviv's latest piece, "The Science of Sex Abuse," explores the difficult medical, legal and moral questions in civil commitment in cases of possessing child pornography.

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To Avoid Planned Parenthood, Texas Launches State Women's Health Program

Wednesday, January 09, 2013

As of January 1st, Texas began its own, state-funded Women's Health Program, forgoing federal Medicaid funds to avoid using Planned Parenthood health providers. Ben Philpott, senior reporter for KUT in Austin, discusses the new program and how it serves low-income women in Texas.

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'Farewell, Fred Voodoo': A Journalist's Career in Haiti

Tuesday, January 08, 2013

Journalist and author Amy Wilentz first traveled to Haiti in 1986, as the regime of Jean-Claude "Baby Doc" Duvalier began to crumble and fall. Today, more than 25 years later, Wilentz reflects on the unique nation that has made her career in her new book, "Farewell, Fred Voodoo."

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The Geithner Legacy

Tuesday, January 08, 2013

As President Obama prepares for his second term, Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner plans to leave as soon as Congress confirms his replacement. Geithner has certainly faced an uphill battle since assuming the position in 2009, in the midst of the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression. Michael Barr, professor of law at the University of Michigan Law School who previously served in the U.S. Treasury Department, examines his legacy.

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Predicting the Top Risks for 2013

Monday, January 07, 2013

One week into 2013, and many pundits have already released their predictions for the top stories of the new year. Some are predictable, such as the likely political fight over the debt ceiling in March, but others are unexpected, just as few anticipated that 2011 would have seen such rapid change across the Middle East and North Africa. Ian Bremmer, president of the Eurasia Group, is an expert at predicting the unexpected. Today, the Eurasia Group releases its report on the top risks to watch in 2013, with a number of surprising results.

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House Allows Violence Against Women Act to Expire

Friday, January 04, 2013

In the midst of the fiscal cliff negotiations, Congress allowed the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) to expire. In its eighteen years of existence, VAWA has provided $4.7 billion for training police, prosecutors, health care professionals and many others on how to handle cases involving violence against women. Chris Mallios is an attorney advisor for AEquitas, an organization that provides these trainings. He explains how VAWA-funded education has changed the way many Americans understand violence against women.

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Lessons from Traditional Societies on Raising Children, Caring for the Elderly

Thursday, January 03, 2013

Within civilizations made out of hunter-gatherers, the practices for raising children and caring for the elderly are far different than in the developed world in the West. But, there may be lessons to be learned from these traditional societies. Jared Diamond has spent nearly 50 years studying culture and civilizations in Papua New Guinea. His latest book is called, "The World Until Yesterday: What Can We Learn from Traditional Societies?"

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New Immigration Policy Helps Undocumented with Citizen Relatives

Thursday, January 03, 2013

On Wednesday, the Department of Homeland Security announced a rule change that will help undocumented immigrants who are immediate relatives of American citizens. Julia Preston, national immigration correspondent for Takeaway partner The New York Times, explains the intricacies of this new policy, which may affect up to one million people. 

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What We Can Learn from the Soviet Withdrawal from Afghanistan

Thursday, January 03, 2013

In February 1989, after nine long years, the last Soviet troops left Afghanistan. Today, as the United States transitions out of the country, Nikolas Gvosdev, professor of national security studies at the U.S. Naval War College, says that Americans have plenty of lessons to learn from the Soviet withdrawal. 

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From President Johnson to President Obama

Tuesday, January 01, 2013

Robert Caro is the author of the multi-volume Pulitzer Prize-winning biography, “The Years of Lyndon Johnson.”  The most recent installment is entitled "The Passage of Power." He sat down with The Takeaway's John Hockenberry to reflect on the unique obstacles and successes President Johnson faced after his election in 1964.

 

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