Streams

Jillian Weinberger

Associate Producer

Jillian Weinberger appears in the following:

Immigration, Race and Hair, Through Chimamanda Ngozie Adichie's Eyes

Wednesday, May 15, 2013

The immigrant experience has long been part and parcel of the American literary tradition."Americanah," the new novel by celebrated author Chimamanda Ngozie Adichie, explores the immigrant experience through Nigerian eyes. Her story follows a young couple, Ifemelu and Obinze, high school sweethearts in Lagos who find very different paths to adulthood.

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U.S. Seizes A.P.'s Phone Records: Media Surveillance and the Law

Wednesday, May 15, 2013

On May 7, 2012, the Associated Press published an article about a Yemen-based terror plot that was thwarted by the C.I.A. Around that time, the Justice Department began collecting the phone records of several A.P. reporters across the country, without the organization’s knowledge. Bob Garfield, co-host of On the Media, explores the fallout.

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Rep. Keith Ellison on Islamophobia and Home-Grown Terrorism

Tuesday, May 14, 2013

In the wake of a Minnesota case in which nine Somali immigrants left the U.S. to fight with Al-Shabab, an al-Qaeda-linked militant group fighting to create an Islamic state in Somalia, and the Boston bombing, Americans are re-thinking our understanding of home-grown terrorism. While Congressman Keith Ellison, Democrat from Minnesota’s fifth district, is certainly concerned about these recent cases, as the first Muslim representative elected to Congress, he also cautions against undue surveillance of Muslim communities.

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Cleveland's Puerto Rican Community Reacts to Kidnappings

Friday, May 10, 2013

As a member of Cleveland's Puerto Rican community, Arielle M. Rios distinctly remembers the day of Gina DeJesus's disappearance. She describes the community's reaction DeJesus's release, and learning that Ariel Castro, who hung a Puerto Rican flag on the porch of the home where he kept the three victims, is the lead suspect in this kidnapping case.

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The Drama and Lasting Influence of 'The Great Gatsby'

Friday, May 10, 2013

In anticipation of Baz Lurhmann’s “The Great Gatsby” opening in theaters this weekend, novelists Chang-Rae Lee, Jeffrey Eugenides and Nell Freudenberger discuss the novel's influence on their writing and the difficulty of transferring Nick Carraway's voice to the big screen.

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The Evolution of Marijuana Culture

Thursday, May 09, 2013

Marijuana culture in this country is changing. There was legalization of recreational marijuana use back in November in Washington and Colorado. Medical marijuana is still legal in California. Today, we explore the different issues that weed legalization and use pose.

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Cleveland Alarmed After Abduction Case

Wednesday, May 08, 2013

Cleveland is feeling a mix of emotions this week after the discovery and rescue of three young women who were kidnapped 9, 10, and 11 years ago and held captive in a residential home for years. The community is celebrating their safe return, but there are also questions and alarm. Connie Schultz, syndicated columnist and Cleveland resident, says the community is reeling.

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South Carolina Elects Ex-Governor Mark Sanford to Congress

Wednesday, May 08, 2013

Only 4 years ago, former Governor Mark Sanford was embroiled in an ethics scandal stemming from his disappearance to visit his mistress in Argentina. But last night, all that seemed forgotten as he was elected to South Carolina's First Congressional District with a 10-percentage-point lead over the Democratic candidate, Elizabeth Colbert Busch. Brian Hicks, a political columnist for the Charleston Post and Courier, discusses the circumstances that led to Sanford's comeback.

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From Technology to Agriculture, Immigration Reform and American Workers

Tuesday, May 07, 2013

As Congress debates immigration reform, industries across the country want a piece of the pie. While tech companies lobby for programs to bring scientists and engineers to the US, farmers are looking to expand guest worker programs for more agricultural hands in the field. But how do these programs affect American workers?

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Searching for Justice in the South Bronx

Friday, May 03, 2013

As the executive director of the Bronx Defenders, a public defense and legal services organization, Robin Steinberg has spent her career demanding justice for the residents of the poorest Congressional district in the nation. This year marks the 50th anniversary of Gideon v. Wainwright, the landmark Supreme Court case that created the public defender system to ensure some balance between prosecution and defense, but as Steinberg explains, "Leveling the playing field is simply impossible."

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Justice Denied at Guantanamo Bay

Friday, May 03, 2013

Guantanamo Bay, Cuba: 45-square-miles of complex legal questions, where the Constitution may (or may not) apply, and where, as of Wednesday, May 1st, 100 of the 166 detainees are on hunger strike. Jeffrey Rosen, law professor at George Washington University and legal affairs editor at The New Republic, describes the legal complexities embodied in the detention and treatment of the prisoners at Guantanamo Bay.

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Striving for Justice in a Multicultural Society

Friday, May 03, 2013

In countries across the globe, communities with very different cultural backgrounds are still trying to reconcile lofty ideals of universal justice with the tensions of tradition, as David Miller, professor at the University of Oxford, explains. And while the problem of justice in multicultural societies may seem like a very modern issue, Martha Nussbaum, professor of at the University of Chicago Law School, explores the original concepts of these ideas, all the way back in ancient Athens.

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Justice on the Streets of Birmingham, 1963

Friday, May 03, 2013

This week marks 50 years since the Children’s Crusade in Birmingham, Alabama, when more than a thousand African-American children gathered in downtown Birmingham to peacefully protest segregation. Then a teenager, Janice Kelsey left high school to march that day and faced arrest as Birmingham police, led by the infamous commissioner Eugene "Bull" Connor, attacked her friends with high pressure fire hoses, police dogs and clubs.

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Chemical Weapons in Syria: Israel Responds

Wednesday, May 01, 2013

As Syria’s neighbor to the South, Israelis have their sights trained on the border. Yesterday, President Obama confirmed that chemical weapons are being used in Syria, but even with this evidence, it's unclear whether American intervention would ultimately benefit Israel. Michael Oren, Israel's Ambassador to the United States, discusses the use of chemical weapons in Syria and the prospect of American intervention.

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1979: The Birth of the Modern Age

Tuesday, April 30, 2013

In his new book, "Strange Rebels: 1979 and the Birth of the 21st Century," journalist Christian Caryl argues that the year 1979 radically changed the course of history. As Deng Xiaoping moved Communist China to a market-based economy, the Ayatollah Khomeini emerged from exile and returned triumphantly to Iran. A young woman named Margaret Thatcher took the reins of power in Britain, while Pope John Paul II inspired millions of Polish citizens living under Communist rule.

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Hunger Strike Grows at Guantanamo

Thursday, April 25, 2013

The U.S. military says that 92 prisoners are now on a hunger strike at the detention facility, and the military is force feeding 17 of them. The prisoners' attorneys dispute that number, stating that 130 of the 166 captives joined the strike two months ago. Miami Herald correspondent Carol Rosenberg recently returned from Guantanamo with the latest on the growing hunger strike and the prisoners' demands. 

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George W. Bush Library Dedicated in Dallas

Thursday, April 25, 2013

Today President Obama and four of his predecessors will gather for the dedication of the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum in University Park, Texas. The library officially opens on May 1 on the campus of Southern Methodist University, but Peter Baker, White House correspondent for Takeaway partner The New York Times, got a sneak peak. 

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Knowing Your Neighbors: Boston Bombers Lived 200 Yards Away

Thursday, April 25, 2013

After the bombings at the Boston Marathon last week, residents in the city have come together in a sign of resilience. On The Takeaway this week, we're talking about the importance of residents getting to know their neighbors, especially during times of crisis or tragedy. For Hassan Malik, little did he know that the Boston bombers lived just 200 yards from his home.

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Fitting in: Immigrant Children and Assimilation

Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Fifteen percent of the U.S. immigrant population is between the ages of five and seventeen. Immigrant children often face a number of barriers to integration or assimilation: many arrive speaking only their native language, and many have witnesses serious violence in their homelands. Whether the Tsanaev brothers had difficulties integrating into American society as young immigrants is unknown, but the Tsarnaev case does highlight the issues many immigrant children face in the United States.

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An Inconvenient Truth: Mounting Evidence Syria Crossed 'Red Line'

Wednesday, April 24, 2013

There are now three nations saying they have evidence of the use of chemical weapons by the Assad regime in Syria. Israel's senior military intelligence analyst said the regime used chemical weapons "repeatedly" last month and France and Britain also wrote confidential letters to the United Nations with physical proof behind this claim.

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