Streams

Jen Poyant

Senior Producer, The Takeaway

Jen Poyant appears in the following:

The Power Behind the Murdoch Family's Shareholding Clout

Wednesday, July 20, 2011

Yesterday, News Corp. shares rose 6 percent after reports circulated that some of the company's board members want to replace Rupert Murdoch with Charles "Chase" Carey, president, COO, and deputy chairman of the company. Murdoch would still remain chairman, though, which begs the question: would a new CEO bring about change in the way that News Corp. is governed?

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Should News Corp.'s Minor Shareholders Have More Power?

Tuesday, July 19, 2011

Rupert Murdoch and his family control most of News Corp. through their majority of voting shares. But there are other, smaller shareholders that speak up when they see something amiss in the practices of the company. Recently one shareholder, The Nathan Cummings Foundation, vied for Murdoch to change the company's disclosure policies for political contributions, and Murdoch complied. Is that indicative of how the company works, or a rare exception to the corporation's usual practices?

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FBI Opens Probe Into News Corp Hacking Scandal

Friday, July 15, 2011

The repercussions from the News of the World hacking scandal are slowly spreading across the Atlantic to American shores. Yesterday, the FBI opened an investigation into whether News Corp. employees tried to hack into phones belonging to 9/11 victims and their family members. They began the investigation after Republican Rep. Peter King, chairman of the Homeland Security Committee, made a call for the probe. In related news, Rebekah Brooks, the embattled chief executive of News International, News Corporation's British newspaper subsidiary, has agreed to step down following weeks of political and public pressure.

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What Does It Mean To Be Long-Term Unemployed? Stories from This Week

Friday, July 15, 2011

Congress is debating over raising the debt ceiling and meanwhile, Americans are struggling everyday with the harsh realities of the troubled economy. This week we spoke with individuals who have battled unemployment or temporary jobs for years. Today we compiled their stories into one segment.

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US Lawmakers Call for News Corp. Investigation

Thursday, July 14, 2011

The fallout from the News of the World hacking scandal seems far from contained this morning, as U.S. lawmakers call for an investigation into whether any American laws were broken during the alleged hacking practices at News Corporation's British newspaper subsidiary News International. Democratic Senators Barbara Boxer, Jay Rockefeller, and Frank Lautenberg, called for the FBI to investigate the day after News Corporation announced it was pulling out its $12 billion bid to take full control of British Sky Broadcasting, a British pay-for-TV outlet.

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Online Retailers Battle to Avoid Sales Tax

Thursday, July 14, 2011

The online retailer Amazon is getting into the ballot initiative business. The company is pushing for a referendum in California that would eliminate sales tax for online retailers that have a limited physical presence in the state.

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Listening to the Stories of the Long-Term Unemployed

Wednesday, July 13, 2011

We have been hearing stories of struggles in the job market and small triumphs this week on The Takeaway. We’re asking listeners to tell us their stories of how unemployment has affected their lives. 

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McConnell Proposes 'Plan B' on Raising the Debt Ceiling

Wednesday, July 13, 2011

As the August 2 deadline to raise the debt ceiling draws closer, there's more talk about the dire economic consequences that will ensue if policy makers in Washington fail to reach an agreement on a budget plan. Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell says that a bipartisan agreement is not likely to happen, and has proposed a plan in which the president could increase the federal debt limit without Congressional approval.

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Checking In On the Long-Term Unemployed

Tuesday, July 12, 2011

As Washington battles it out over the deficit and the August 2 deadline to raise the debt ceiling, there is another important economic discussion happening across the country. Last week, the unemployment rate reached 9.2 percent, and by the end of this year money for many jobless benefits will disappear. As lawmakers haggle over the debt ceiling in Washington, are they failing to address the jobs crisis?

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News Corp. Scandal Spreads to Other International Papers

Tuesday, July 12, 2011

Rupert Murdoch’s British media empire remains under fire as allegations continue to unfold — not only about the now-shuttered News of the World, but about other media outlets within the company. The Sunday Times and The Sun, both British papers owned by Murdoch’s News International, are accused of attempting to hack Prime Minister Gordon Brown’s phone, bank account and family medical records, as well as paying bribes to members of Scotland Yard officers for information about members of the royal family.

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US Ambassador's Visit Garners Mixed Response in Syria

Monday, July 11, 2011

U.S. Ambassador Robert Ford's visit to Syria has drawn the condemnation of the Assad regime. Ford visited the city of Hama, a center of anti-Assad sentiment, where pro-democracy activists greeted him with flowers and olive branches. Meanwhile, in Damascus, pro-Assad demonstrators hurled rocks and eggs at the U.S. Embassy, protesting Ford's visit. 

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Afghanistan: 10 Things You May Not Know

Thursday, July 07, 2011

Plans for the troop drawdown in Afghanistan are underway. The Defense Department announced that the first regiments to head home will be finishing their tours of duty this month, and won’t be replaced. But after nearly a decade of combat there, how much do we really know about Afghanistan and what this will mean for the country? 

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A Texas Execution Raises Red Flags in the International Community

Thursday, July 07, 2011

An execution scheduled in Texas today is making international headlines. Should Humberto Leal Garcia, Jr. die at the hands of the state, the U.S.'s diplomatic relations with Mexico could be adversely impacted, and possibly may violate the U.S.'s compliance with the U.N.’s Vienna Convention on Consular Relations. Garcia was convicted in 1994 of raping and killing a 16-year-old girl in Texas. He is a Mexican national and was not informed that he could access Mexican consular officials after his arrest. Garcia has been denied clemency from the state of Texas, but President Obama has asked that the Supreme Court weigh in on his case by today.

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Evaluating the Effectiveness of Medicaid

Thursday, July 07, 2011

Cuts to entitlements like Medicare and Medicaid are continue to be used as bargaining chips as the debate over the budget rages on in Washington. Already some states have begun cutting back their Medicaid programs. 

But a new study out today in the National Bureau of Economic Research shows that people on Medicaid see doctors more regularly, and are more financially stable and less depressed than the uninsured. These findings could be crucial selling points as lawmakers debate the effectiveness versus cost of the health program.

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Nation Building at Home: Adding Up the Numbers

Friday, June 24, 2011

President Obama is selling his plan to pull troops out of Afghanistan by describing it as an opportunity to refocus on the domestic health of America. His term, "nation building at home" recalls the great American eras like the industrial and gilded ages. They eventually led to new railroads and highways, the infrastructure that powered us into the boom time of the 1950s.

 

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Finding Fiction from the Grim Realities of War: Patricia McArdle's 'Farishta'

Thursday, June 23, 2011

Over our nearly decade-long war in Afghanistan, we've become accustomed to hearing stories of death and destruction—loss of life has become the price of this war. Former Foreign Service officer Patricia McArdle has written a story of re-birth and a second chance at life, based on her time in Afghanistan. Her new novel, "Farishta," tells the story of Angela Morgan, whose husband died in the bombing of the U.S. embassy in Beirut in 1983. After mourning for 20 years, Angela is sent to an isolated British Army compound in Afghanistan, and it's there that she is reborn.

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Should Farmers in Developing Nations Be Shielded from Volitile Food Prices?

Thursday, June 23, 2011

Volatile food prices are making the survival of the small farmer in developing countries nearly impossible. As the developed world weathers the storms of rising food prices through sophisticated commodities markets, smaller operations in Latin America, Asia and Africa are left to the mercy of massive price fluctuations.

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Does Troop Withdrawal from Afghanistan Mean the War is Over?

Wednesday, June 22, 2011

On Wednesday evening President Obama will unveil his exit strategy from Afghanistan. We’ll hear exactly how many of our troops will be coming home and when the U.S. military will hand over power to Afghan security forces. This comes nearly a decade after the first U.S. military campaign against Al-Qaeda and Taliban forces. There has been mounting political pressure on the president to instigate a significant withdrawal and many people are hoping this marks the closing chapter of the War in Afghanistan. 

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First Amendment Rights for Students on FB and MySpace?

Wednesday, June 22, 2011

Students have been complaining about their teachers and principals, probably since the first schoolhouses opened. But in the Internet age, it's easy for students broadcast their frustrations publicly via social networks, and courts are now having to step in and define whether their online back talk is protected free speech.

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Lulz Security Collective: A Return to Old School Hacking?

Wednesday, June 22, 2011

UK authorities have arrested a 19-year-old under suspicion for his potential connection to the hacking group LulzSec. The group has claimed to have pulled off attacks on PBS, Sony and the Senate.

The group has a mischievous persona. It has set up a hotline for people to call in and suggest sites that should be attacked. The recorded voice that answers claims, in an exaggerated French accent, that "Pierre Dubois and Franvois Deluxe" are not available because they’re out hacking websites. Yesterday, they announced that they're teaming up with Anonymous, another hacking group with a deeper political bent.

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