Streams

Jen Poyant

Senior Producer, The Takeaway

Jen Poyant appears in the following:

Classroom Views: Common Core Comes to Tampa

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

All this week, The Takeaway is getting a close-up look at classrooms around the U.S. Today, we head to Monroe Middle School in Tampa, FL. Like many schools around the country, Monroe is adopting the curriculum called Common Core—a shift to a more structured, discussion, and logic-oriented approach to teaching writing and math. John O’Connor covers education for StateImpact Florida and WUSF in Tampa. He says that the Common Core seems to be a good fit for Monroe.

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Ben & Jerry Take on Citizens United

Monday, March 10, 2014

Four years ago the U.S. Supreme Court made a blockbuster decision in the case of Citizens United, which dramatically changed the way political campaigns are funded. With the midterm election season about to get underway, The Takeaway speaks with the founders of the ice cream company Ben & Jerry’s—Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield—about money and politics in the post-Citizens United era and their campaign to reverse the Citizens United decision.

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Examining Ukraine's Uncertain Future

Monday, February 24, 2014

Who is in charge in Ukraine? Will President Yanukovych face charges of mass murder? How might Ukraine move forward during this uncertain time? What action should the international community take? The Takeaway explores this and more with Andriy Kulykov, a reporter for Ukraine Public Radio; Oleh Rybachuk, chief of staff to former President Viktor Yushchenko; Regina Smyth, an expert on Russia and associate professor of Political Science at Indiana University; and Nicolai Petro, a political science professor at the University of Rhode Island currently stationed in Ukraine's third largest city, Odessa, for a Fulbright Scholarship.

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In Search of a Stolen Stradivarius

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Earlier this week, Milwaukee concertmaster Frank Almond was walking to a car after a performance when his 1715 Stradivarius violin was stolen by a thief. A former FBI special agent discussed the world of high art theft and the history of stolen violins.

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Syria: A Diplomatic Dance & the Music of War

Tuesday, February 04, 2014

Is America's approach to Syria failing? Nancy Soderberg, former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, discusses Syria's future and the Obama administration's agenda. Each morning, Syrian composer Kinan Azmeh asks himself if everything is all right—he asks this of himself, his family and his friends. Yet sometimes there is no answer to that question, as his piece "A Sad Morning Every Morning" shows. He joins The Takeaway to discuss the relationship between war and music.

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Pay-for-Play: Should College Athletes Be Unionized?

Monday, February 03, 2014

A group of football players at Northwestern University are attempting to organize and join a labor union. It’s the latest move in the complicated relationship between the NCAA and its athletes, some of whom believe they should be payed and protected as workers. Joe Nocera, columnist for our partner The New York Times, says these student athletes should be able to form a union. Former NCAA athlete Ibrahim Abdul-Matin agrees. Ibrahim is a former linebacker at the University of Rhode Island and an NCAA scholar-athlete.

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Bill and Melinda Gates on the Myths of Poverty

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Since launching their foundation in 2000, Bill and Melinda Gates have granted nearly $30 billion to organizations and individuals working to eradicate poverty. In an interview on Tuesday with Takeaway host John Hockenberry, the couple talk about why poor countries aren't doomed to stay poor.

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A Defense of Russia's Vladimir Putin

Monday, January 20, 2014

With less than three weeks until the opening ceremonies at the 2014 Winter Olympic Games in Sochi, Russian President Vladimir Putin has been put in the international spotlight. Dmitry Babich is a political analyst for Voice of Russia, the country's state-run radio network. He defends President Putin's actions in the months before the Olympic Games. "Putin just wants the world to see that Russia is a normal country," he tells The Takeaway's John Hockenberry.

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Obama Overhauls NSA's Surveillance Programs

Friday, January 17, 2014

President Barack Obama has announced a major overhaul of the National Security Agency's (NSA) surveillance practices. The president said that in order for the nation's intelligence community to be effective over the long haul, the trust of the American people must be maintained. To maintain that trust, the president said he would end the vast collection of phone data “as it exists” today. The Takeaway's Washington Correspondent, Todd Zwillich breaks it down with further NSA analysis from Pulitzer Prize winning author Lawrence Wright.

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Sales Decline for Iconic Boeing 'Jumbo Jet'

Tuesday, December 24, 2013

The Boeing 747 once ruled the skies as the largest and most popular passenger airplane. But more and more airlines are moving away from the Jumbo Jet. Economics reporter Carolyn Adolph at member station KUOW in Seattle, explains the history of the 747 and why the "Queen of the Skies" is stepping down from its throne.

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The Second Life of Sherlock Holmes

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Sherlock Holmes' love for logic and sharp eye would go on to inspire mystery writers and real-life crime scene investigators alike. A new PBS documentary takes a look how Sherlock Holmes still informs the way we think and investigate real crimes, even today. What is about Holmes that inspires even modern investigators to cautiously and methodically look at the clues in order to solve a crime? Kimberlee Sue Moran, a forensic archaeologist featured in "How Sherlock Changed the World" explains.

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Wheels of Justice Slowly Turning at Gitmo

Monday, December 16, 2013

As Americans prepare to head home for the Christmas and New Year's holidays, the families of the victims of the 9/11 attacks will be keeping a close eye on the wheels of justice, which are slowly turning down in Guantanamo Bay this holiday season. A second set of pre-trial hearings for five Guantanamo detainees charged in the 9/11 attacks will be held this week. Carol Rosenberg, reporter for the Miami Herald, joins The Takeaway to give a sense of what we can expect to see.

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The Road Ahead for Syria & the OPCW

Monday, December 09, 2013

On Tuesday, the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons will accept their Nobel Peace Prize in Stockholm. Last month, they triumphantly met their deadline for the removal of Syria’s weapons cache. Though much progress has been made, there is still a great deal of work left to be done. Sigrid Kaag, special coordinator of the joint mission of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons and the United Nations, provides a look ahead at the OPCW's timeline for destroying all of the weapons.

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Thanksgiving and Hanukkah Overlap, Tastily

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

We're all looking forward to firing up the oven tomorrow and for those preparing a Thanksgiving feast in a Jewish household, this is the year to get creative in the kitchen. Thanksgiving and Hanukkah coincide this year, so it's time to explore where those two culinary worlds meet. Deb Perelman, food blogger and author of The Smitten Kitchen Cookbook, joins the Takeaway to discuss so-called 'Thanksgivukkah' recipes.

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In Harm's Way: The Faces of Gun Violence

Monday, November 25, 2013

Since the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School nearly a year ago, more than 30,000 people in the United States have died from gunfire, according to estimates from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Slate. Kathleen Horan is a reporter at WNYC Radio. She profiled 10 children killed by gunfire in New York City in the past year in an attempt to put a face, a voice and a story to these statistics. Kathleen joins us today to discuss her findings. 

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A Worldwide View of Storm Surges In One Map

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

There are all sorts of humanitarian and relief efforts that happen in hard-hit countries after disasters like Typhoon Haiyan. But not all disasters have equally damaging effects. The storm surge from Typhoon Haiyan reached as high as 23 feet and in some places sea water churned up by the storm far exceeded that. James K. Mitchell, a professor of geography at Rutgers University, joins The Takeaway to explain how storm surge makes natural disasters riskier.

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One Woman's Quest to Recover Her Family's Artwork Stolen by the Nazis

Friday, November 08, 2013

A close friend of Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso, art dealer Paul Rosenberg once dominated Paris's art scene. Nazi forces confiscated much of Rosenberg's collection, at least 400 artworks worth millions of dollars. Marianne Rosenberg, Paul's granddaughter and Alexandre's son, continues her family's quest to recover their stolen art. This week, Marianne confirmed that one of her family's Matisse paintings was in the trove of Nazi-confiscated art recently discovered in Munich. 

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Recovery in The Rockaways A Year After Sandy

Monday, October 28, 2013

It was a year ago this week that Super Storm Sandy hit the beaches of New York and New Jersey. Each neighborhood hit by Hurricane Sandy has a story. As our Senior Producer Jen Poyant explains, in the neighborhood of the Rockaways, the story of Sandy has become a story of waiting—waiting for financial assistance, waiting for the permits to rebuild, and waiting for friends and neighbors to come home for good.

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Arianna Huffington Speaks Out on Anonymous Comments & Freedom of Expression

Friday, August 23, 2013

Beginning next month, the online news site will require users to comment on stories under their real names. Arianna Huffington, President and Editor-in-Chief of the Huffington Post Media Group, says the site has garnered more than 260 million comments since it launched, and she wants the media property to promote civil conversation.

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The Lingering Stress of War for Military Families

Wednesday, August 07, 2013

The stress of war lingers not just with our veterans but with their families as well. Take Vivian Greentree, Director of Research and Policy for Blue Star Families, for example. Vivian's husband Mike is frequently on deployment. Their son M.J. sees many families who deal with issues related to PTSD, and they themselves, like all military families, constantly deal with the daily stresses of military life. Vivian and M.J. join the program to share their experience.

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