Streams

Jeffrey Rosen

Professor of Law at George Washington University

Jeffrey Rosen appears in the following:

Should We Have the 'Right to Be Forgotten' Online?

Tuesday, May 13, 2014

Europe's highest court is giving a little bit more power back to the people. On Tuesday, the European Court of Justice in Luxembourg ruled that in some cases, Google must grant users a so-called "right to be forgotten."

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Supreme Court Upholds Prayer at Town Meetings

Monday, May 05, 2014

In a 5-4 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that public meetings can include an opening prayer, saying that the practice does not constitute a religious preference.

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SCOTUS Strikes Down Limits on Campaign Contributions

Wednesday, April 02, 2014

The high court's decision frees the nation's wealthiest donors to contribute to as many candidates and party organizations as they want...and thereby have greater influence in federal elections.

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Supreme Court Halts Contraception Mandate for Religious Groups

Thursday, January 02, 2014

On Tuesday, Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor temporarily blocked the Obama administration from forcing some religious-affiliated groups to provide health insurance coverage of birth control or face penalties as part of the Affordable Care Act. Joining The Takeaway to explain what this means for the law is Jeffrey Rosen, president and CEO of the National Constitution Center.

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Video Surveillance, Facial Recognition Technology and the Law

Thursday, August 29, 2013

Ohio law enforcement have been using facial recognition technology to match driver’s license photos and surveillance footage for months, without telling the public. Jeffrey Rosen, president of the National Constitution Center and professor at George Washington University Law School, describes the current law on surveillance and facial recognition technology.

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SCOTUS Decisions Bring Landmark Change

Thursday, June 27, 2013

It may be hard to believe, but just one month ago, the United States was a very different place to live. There were historic Supreme Court decisions out on affirmative action, voting rights and same-sex marriage, but there were also other decisions issued that some may have missed. Contributing their thoughts are Ron Christie, Republican political strategist, Farai Chideya, distinguished writer in residence at New York University’s Journalism Institute, and Jeffrey Rosen, professor of law at George Washington University, and President of the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia.

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Supreme Court to Decide Five Landmark Cases This Month

Monday, June 03, 2013

By the end of this month we could be living in a very different United States. That’s because decisions will be coming down in five landmark cases before the Supreme Court. At stake: affirmative action, voting rights, gene patenting, and same-sex marriage. Jeffrey Rosen, professor of law at George Washington University and President of the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia, explains the cultural significance of these historic cases.

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'The Deciders'

Friday, May 31, 2013

There's a small group of men and women - "Deciders" - at big tech companies like Google, Facebook, and Twitter who make decisions everyday about what offensive speech is pulled from their sites. The huge scale of those sites gives those Deciders enormous influence over the state of free speech on the web. Bob speaks with George Washington University Law professor Jeffrey Rosen, who wrote about the Deciders and their many decisions in The New Republic.

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Justice Denied at Guantanamo Bay

Friday, May 03, 2013

Guantanamo Bay, Cuba: 45-square-miles of complex legal questions, where the Constitution may (or may not) apply, and where, as of Wednesday, May 1st, 100 of the 166 detainees are on hunger strike. Jeffrey Rosen, law professor at George Washington University and legal affairs editor at The New Republic, describes the legal complexities embodied in the detention and treatment of the prisoners at Guantanamo Bay.

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Hearings for Obama Judicial Nominee Begin Today

Wednesday, April 10, 2013

The most important court in Washington, D.C. may just be the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. The D.C. Circuit, as it's known, hears some of the most important federal cases. The Senate Judiciary Committee will begin hearings today on the nomination of Sri Srinivasan to the D.C. Circuit.

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Affirmative Action to Warrantless Wiretapping: The Upcoming Supreme Court Term

Monday, October 01, 2012

The Supreme Court begins its 2012-2012 term today, just months after announcing its decision on the Affordable Care Act. While the Court has announced only half of the cases it will hear over the next nine months, Jeffrey Rosen, professor of law at George Washington University, explains that the Justices already have a number of contentious issues on the calendar.

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Awaiting the Supreme Court

Monday, June 18, 2012

Jeffrey Rosen is a professor of law at The George Washington University, legal affairs editor of The New Republic, and author of The Supreme Court: The Personalities and Rivalries that Defined America. As the Supreme Court's session nears completion, Rosen looks at the decisions to be decided, including the Affordable Care Act and the Arizona immigration case.

 

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Supreme Court Considers Arizona's Immigration Law Today

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Fresh off hearing oral arguments for and against President Obama’s health care overhaul, the Supreme Court is stepping back into the political spotlight. Today, the high court will consider the legality of Arizona’s tough crackdown on illegal immigrants. Jeffrey Rosen, professor of law at George Washington University, talks about the major legal implications of SCOTUS' coming ruling. 

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Political Ads on Public Broadcasting?

Friday, April 13, 2012

Public broadcasting doesn't have commercials. It has underwriting announcements — and few of them at that. But that's about to change, now that the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that the FCC violated the First Amendment when it blocked public broadcasters from airing political advertisements. Jeffrey Rosen, professor of Law at George Washington University, describes how the ruling could change the face of public radio and TV.

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Obama vs. the Supreme Court: US Attorney General Issues Memo

Friday, April 06, 2012

Yesterday Attorney General Eric Holder issued a memo, assuring the Supreme Court that President Obama respects the authority of the court to overturn federal laws they find unconstitutional. This memo came after Republican challengers to the Affordable Care Act accused the President of pressuring the Court during deliberations. We discuss the controversy with Jeffrey Rosen, Professor of Law at George Washington University, and Todd Zwillich, Takeaway Washington correspondent.

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Day Three: The Supreme Court and Health Care

Wednesday, March 28, 2012

Yesterday was the second of three days of hearings in the Supreme Court's review of Obama’s Affordable Care Act. The session was devoted to one key question: Is Congress overstepping its Constitutional power by requiring nearly all Americans to carry health insurance? Jeffrey Rosen is back to break it all down for us, and to give us a preview of what will happen in today’s third and final day of hearings. Rosen is professor of law at George Washington University, and he’s been following the arguments closely. He joins us from Washington, D.C.

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Questions and Answers on the Affordable Care Act

Wednesday, March 28, 2012

The Supreme Court is hearing arguments on the Affordable Care Act Monday through Wednesday this week. But to your average, non-legal-scholar, the arguments can be hard to follow, and the specifics of the Act itself can very confusing. A lot of Takeaway listeners have been writing in with their questions about the Act. Todd Zwillich, the Takeaway’s Washington correspondent, is here to answer some of them.

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Day Two: The Supreme Court and Health Care

Tuesday, March 27, 2012

Taxes, penalties, and tax penalties. That sums up much of what was discussed at yesterday's Supreme Court hearing on the 2010 health care overhaul bill, also known as the Affordable Care Act. Today's hearing, in which the court will focus on the constitutionality of the health overhaul, promises to be much more exciting. We speak with Jeffrey Rosen, professor of law at George Washington University, and Monica Haymond, a legal assistant originally from California who's been sleeping outside the Supreme Court Building since Friday night, hoping to get into today’s hearing.

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Supreme Court Hears Challenge to Health Care Law Today

Monday, March 26, 2012

The Supreme Court will hear a challenge to President Obama’s healthcare law today, kicking off a three-day proceeding. The Affordable Care Act mandates an expansion of health insurance to 30 million more Americans within a decade, as well as for the ire it has roused in Republican lawmakers and citizens, alike. To look ahead to next three days of health care debate and discussion, Jeffrey Rosen, professor of law at George Washington University, joins us.

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Supreme Court to Rule on Corporate Crime and Personhood

Tuesday, February 28, 2012

Using the 14th amendment as their basis, many courts have treated corporations as people. Usually these rulings are beneficial to corporations and their larger interests, such as in the Supreme Court decision that allows corporations to endorse candidates like individuals. However, a new case will determine whether or not a corporation can be convicted as an accomplice to a crime against humanity. In Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum, Royal Dutch Petroleum and its subsidiary, Shell, are accused of aiding an autocratic regime that brutalized minorities in an oil-rich region of Nigeria.

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