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Jami Floyd

IAFC Blogger

Jami Floyd appears in the following:

Remembering Geraldine Ferraro

Monday, March 28, 2011

It's A Free Country blogger Jami Floyd and listeners talk about the impact of Geraldine Ferraro, former member of Congress from Queens and the first woman on a major party presidential ticket.

Read Jami Floyd's post "On Geraldine's Shoulders" and Share your story here.

 

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On Geraldine's Shoulders

Sunday, March 27, 2011

Today when she saw the headline on the front page of the Los Angeles Times, “Geraldine Ferraro: A ‘Lightening Bolt’ for Women in Politics,” my twelve-year-old daughter asked me, “Mama, who’s Geraldine Ferraro?

Sigh. What to say?

Well, of course, Geraldine Ferraro was the first female nominee for Vice President of the United States. And I started there.

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Elizabeth Taylor: Lone Star in the Fight Against AIDS

Wednesday, March 23, 2011

WNYC
I remember Elizabeth Taylor most of all, not for the breathiness of her famous voice, but for fact that she lent that voice to a community desperately in need of one in its moment of despair.

-- Jami Floyd, on Elizabeth Taylor's AIDS activism

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The Bigger Political Message of Big Love

Wednesday, March 23, 2011

We watched as Henrickson the Man morphed into Henrickson the Politician - an egoist who forgets his original purpose in running for office: To secure the rights of his underrepresented community.

-- Jami Floyd, on the politics of Big Love

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Hateful the Speech, Loving the Law

Thursday, March 03, 2011

Snyder v. Phelps pitted the free speech rights of a group of arguably mean-spirited but dedicated religious zealots against the asserted privacy rights of a sympathetic military family. Classic case. Sounds like a tough decision; but it's easy.

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Defense of Marriage Act is Still Good Law...Until It's Not

Friday, February 25, 2011

Let's all stop and take a deep breath to reconsider the news of this week.

The Obama administration announced it would no longer defend the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA).

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No More Defending the Defense of Marriage Act

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

Same-sex marriage has become one of the most contentious issues of our time. There is one thing, however, proponents and opponents would likely agree upon: these battles being waged in the states are all part of a larger war about what we stand for as a nation. Is ours a limited democracy — retrenched, traditional and exclusionary? Or is our democracy expansive and inclusive — one that evolves over time? On Wednesday, the Obama administration placed itself on the side of an expansive and inclusive democracy.

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The Dangers of One-Size-Fits-All Democracy

Friday, February 18, 2011

For over a month, we’ve been talking about revolution in the Middle East. It started with a man who set himself on fire, desperate, after police confiscated the produce he sold without a permit.

Mohamed Bouazizi, a 26-year-old university graduate without a steady job, was trying to support his family. His self-immolation has left him burned from head to toe, in intensive care, wrapped completely in white gauze bandages. But he spurred his country to action, leading to transformation in Tunisia and demonstrations that spread across North Africa to Egypt. And now the world turns its attention to what will happen next in Yemen, Libya and Bahrain.

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Revolution in Egypt, Evolution in Iraq

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

On the front page of Tuesday's New York Times: Democracy protests in Iran, Yemen and Bahrain. But I want to talk about Iraq. As I mentioned on this page last week, the U.S. miscalculated badly there, spending hundreds of billions of dollars trying to bring democracy to the Middle East. But, in an ironic twist, as the winds of change sweep through the region, true democracy has not come to Iraq.

History teaches that real change is organic and comes from within; it cannot be imposed from without.

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Monday Morning Reality Check: Martial Law, Not Democracy in Egypt

Monday, February 14, 2011

Champions of democracy the world over welcomed the departure of Hosni Mubarak, Friday, with a massive display of joy. Protesters across Cairo savored their victory, and correspondents on TV channels worldwide fought back tears (some, in fact did cry) as they reported the story of a revolution.

I was inspired, instead, to turn to Brother Webster -- as in Webster’s Dictionary, for a little reminder of what all the hoopla was about:

Revolution |n. (pl. s)(Origin Latin revolutio.) a fundamental change in power that takes place in a relatively short period of time.

Given this definition – “a fundamental change in power” perhaps the celebration is a bit premature. I hate to be a spoilsport, but I’m fairly confident that military regime is not what the youth of Egypt had in mind over these last three weeks. And “revolutionary change” is certainly not what has come to Egypt – not yet.

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Egypt — What Happens Now?

Friday, February 11, 2011

I have been watching the events in Egypt over these 18 days and it was clear that the country had risen together for a single cause — the removal of President Hosni Mubarak. But as I have suggested before, a revolution does not a democracy make.

There can be no orderly transition of government in Egypt in the midst of chaos. The protestors have made their point. They have won the day: Murbarak has resigned.

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Opinion: Why One Drop Matters

Thursday, February 10, 2011

Halle Berry may not choose her words as carefully as a politician, but this is the realpolitik she is talking about. She may not be as eloquent as a preacher, but this is the painful process of self-identification that people like us remember. This was a place where skin color and the fullness of your lips and the broadness of your nose could give you away. And, if we are to be honest about it, as Ms. Berry was, America is a place where these factors still determine too much.

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Tear it Down, Build it Up: The Architecture of Democracy

Tuesday, February 08, 2011

Having a constitution and respecting that constitution are clearly not synonymous. Without legitimacy, a constitution is nothing more than words on a page. The importance of a constitutional system has less to do with the actual words in the document than the commitment that the people have to respect it. A large number of Egyptians clearly do not think their Constitution has secured what it promises.

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Taking a Pass on Football for the Next Generation

Monday, February 07, 2011

I love football. And for good reason. My father had no money for college and would not have gone but for track and football scholarships. 

But this is the first year he and I didn’t watch the Super Bowl together. My father now suffers from Parkinson’s disease. I believe — and his doctors do too — that repeated concussions triggered the disease.

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In Egypt, Reflections of a World Not Safe for Journalism

Friday, February 04, 2011

There is great alarm in America about a great many things in Egypt, including the treatment of journalists during recent anti-government protests. The ugly truth, however, predates the Egyptian crisis of the last ten days and spills far beyond the streets of Cairo. Eighty-seven journalists were murdered worldwide in 2010. And that's not taking into account the journalists who have been assaulted, kidnapped, harassed or otherwise suffered violence in the line of duty.

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Obama's Silence on Guantanamo

Tuesday, February 01, 2011

WNYC

In the week since the State of the Union, it seems we analyst-types have dissected every word; but perhaps as many people have taken the President to task for words not spoken: poverty, race, gun control.

For me, there were two more words noticeably absent: Guantanamo Bay.

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What the Oscars Don't Tell Us About Race in America

Friday, January 28, 2011

Too often, the stories black and brown (and women) filmmakers want to tell cannot get a green light. Studios do not want to take the chance on a story that is out of what they perceive to be the mainstream. So, come Oscar time, you don’t see diversity -- in front of the camera, or behind it.

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A Good Speech, But to the Wrong Audience

Wednesday, January 26, 2011

Last night I watched with 100 of my fellow political junkies as President Obama gave his third State of the Union address. We tweeted along, in earnest, with mostly substantive commentary, though the tweets were laced with wry humor about John Boehner's emotional reaction to Obama's remark about his boyhood and whether Vice President Biden himself was tweeting.

I said on this page yesterday that, for Obama, this speech needed to be a big transformational moment, a speech that would evoke FDR and Kennedy, one that would remind us why we voted for him in the first place.

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SOTU Analysis

Wednesday, January 26, 2011

It's A Free Country bloggers Jami Floyd, Karol Markowicz, Justin Krebs, and Solomon Kleinsmith join our listeners in reacting to last night's State of the Union address.

→ Read More and Join the Conversation at It's A Free Country

What Obama Should Say

Monday, January 24, 2011

No doubt, even a great speaker, like President Barack Obama, will be tinkering with his State of the Union speech up to the last minute. So, here is my humble advice in two words: Think Big.

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