Streams

Isabel Wilkerson

Isabel Wilkerson appears in the following:

Has the Case of Trayvon Martin made Sanford the New Birmingham?

Tuesday, April 03, 2012

Sanford, Florida, where 17-year-old Trayvon Martin was shot and killed by 27-year-old George Zimmerman over one month ago, is currently host to the worst kind of attention a small town could possibly imagine. After weeks of protests around the country, the question lingers as to whether the small town's image will be eternally marred the way that Selma or Birmingham, Alabama still evoke the civil rights movement of the 1960s. What connection does this town have to the long history of the American civil rights movement? For answers, we turn to Isabel Wilkerson, a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and author of "The Warmth of Other Suns: the Epic Story of America’s Great Migration."

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Southern Cities Become Less Segregated

Thursday, December 08, 2011

Census data from last year showed more African-Americans from Northern metropolitan areas like New York and Chicago are moving to Southern cities like Atlanta and Kansas City. It’s what’s known as reverse migration. And new analysis done on that census data led by Brown University, shows that a consequence of reverse migration is desegregation, as suburban neighborhoods in some Southern cities become more racially integrated.

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The Great Migration

Thursday, November 24, 2011

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, Isabel Wilkerson, talks about her book, now in paperback, The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration, as listeners share their families' stories of moving away from the Jim Crow south.

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The Great Migration

Thursday, October 06, 2011

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Isabel Wilkerson, talks about her book, now in paperback, The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration,  as listeners share their families' stories of moving away from the Jim Crow south.

Event:  Isabel Wilkerson will be speaking tonight at 6:30 at the Tenement Museum.  RSVP here.

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Census Reveals Great Reversal of 'Great Migration'

Friday, March 25, 2011

The latest Census confirms that once-segregated Southern cities like Atlanta, Dallas, Houston and Miami are luring African Americans from northern metro areas like New York and Chicago. Today, 57 percent of the nation’s black population now lives in the South, which is the highest it's been since 1960. Why are we witnessing a Great Reversal of the Great Migration? For the answer we speak with Isabel Wilkerson, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author of “The Warmth of Other Suns: the Epic Story of America’s Great Migration.”

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Tales from 'The Great Migration'

Thursday, November 25, 2010

The massive migration of black Americans from the South to the North in the early part of last century changed the social and cultural landscape of America forever. Six million African Americans eventually left the South around 1920. Before then, 90 percent of all African Americans lived in the south. By 1970, nearly half lived elsewhere in the country.

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Isabel Wilkerson on The Warmth of Other Suns

Monday, November 08, 2010

Pulitzer Prize winning author Isabel Wilkerson chronicles one of the great untold stories of American history: the decades-long migration of black citizens, who fled the South for northern and western cities in search of a better life. In The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration, she tells this story through the lives of three individuals, and examines how the migration changed the face of America.

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The Warmth of Other Suns

Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Pulitzer Prize winning author Isabel Wilkerson chronicles one of the great untold stories of American history: the decades-long migration of black citizens, who fled the South for northern and western cities in search of a better life. In The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration, she tells this story through the lives of three individuals, and examines how the migration changed the face of America.

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An Oral History of the Great Migration

Wednesday, September 15, 2010

The massive migration of black Americans from the South to the North in the early part of last century changed the social and cultural landscape of America forever.  Six million African Americans eventually left the South around 1920.  Before then, 90 percent of all African Americans lived in the south.  By 1970, nearly half lived elsewhere in the country. 

We're asking our African American listeners: Does your family have a story about the Great Migration? If so, we'd love to hear it: When did your family come north? Why did they leave the South? Tell us your story...

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Excerpt: 'The Warmth of Other Suns'

Wednesday, September 15, 2010

Chapter 1

1

Chickasaw County, Mississippi, Late October 1937

Ida Mae Brandon Gladney

The night clouds were closing in on the salt licks east of the oxbow lakes along the folds in the earth beyond the Yalobusha River. The cotton was at last cleared from the field. Ida Mae tried now to get the children ready and to gather the clothes and quilts and somehow keep her mind off the churning within her. She had sold off the turkeys and doled out in secret the old stools, the wash pots, the tin tub, the bed pallets. Her husband was settling with Mr. Edd over the worth of a year’s labor, and she did not know what would come of it. None of them had been on a train before—not unless you counted the clattering local from Bacon Switch to Okolona, where, “by the time you sit down, you there,” as Ida Mae put it. None of them had been out of Mississippi. Or Chickasaw County, for that matter.

 

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