Streams

Femi Oke

News host and Reporter for The Takeaway

Femi Oke appears in the following:

CDC May Recommend Routine Circumcision

Tuesday, August 25, 2009

In an attempt to slow the spread of HIV, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention might begin recommending circumcisions for all infant boys. The announcement comes out of this week's National HIV Prevention Conference in Atlanta. The CDC likely won't release a formal draft of the proposal for another four to six months, but speculation on it already has emotions flaring.

For more on the debate, we are joined by Dana Goldstein, public health reporter and associate editor for The American Prospect magazine; and Dr. Roy Gulick, chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center.

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Wikipedia to Impose Editing Restrictions

Tuesday, August 25, 2009

Ever since it was founded eight years ago, Wikipedia has declared itself "the free encyclopedia that anyone can edit." But soon, not everyone will be able to edit every article. Starting in a few weeks, the Wikimedia Foundation will require changes made to entries about living people be approved a new class of experienced editors.  The move aims to curb abuse by vandals... but it complicates Wikipedia's wide-open ethos. We speak to Noam Cohen, who writes the "Link by Link" column for The New York Times.

Read Cohen's article on the changes ahead for the online encyclopedia, "Wikipedia to Limit Changes to Articles on People"

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Anticipating the Afghan Election Results

Tuesday, August 25, 2009

Today, preliminary results come in from last week's hotly-contested presidential election in Afghanistan. Both leading candidates, current President Hamid Karzai and leading challenger Abdullah Abdullah, have claimed victory by margins large enough to avoid a run-off election.  For a look at the potential impact the early results could have both there and in the U.S., we talk to Christine Fair, professor at the Center for Peace and Security Studies at Georgetown University, who is just back from Afghanistan as an election monitor; and Martin Patience, BBC correspondent in Kabul, Afghanistan.

 

"There were a number of reports that Karzai actually cut a deal with different Taliban commanders, whereby the Taliban would get their satisfaction of not having people turn up to the vote, i.e. not having folks with their fingers inked in exchange for letting the ballot boxes return with ballots in them." — Christine Fair, who is just back from Afghanistan, where she served as an election monitor.

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Writing (another) Book on Madoff

Tuesday, August 25, 2009

While newspapers and magazines have lined their pages with details of Bernie Madoff's deceit, the literary world is still trying to cash in on the embezzlement drama. The sixth book on the life and times of the convicted Ponzi schemer hits bookstores today.

The book was penned by Sheryl Weinstein, former CEO of Hadassah, the Women’s Zionist Organization of America, and one of Madoff’s investors. We speak to Motoko Rich, who covers the publishing industry for The New York Times, along with author and journalist Erin Arvedlund, whose book “Too Good to be True: The Rise and Fall of Bernie Madoff” just came out this month.

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DOJ to Investigate Alleged CIA Abuses

Tuesday, August 25, 2009

The Justice Department recommended yesterday that Attorney General Eric Holder re-open and examine cases of alleged abuse of suspected al-Qaeda members.  The abuse allegedly took place in secret CIA prisons during former President George W. Bush's administration. To go over the details, we have Vijay Padmanabhan, visiting assistant professor at the Cardozo School of Law in New York City, and Mark Danner, author of the book “Torture and Truth: America, Abu Ghraib, and the War on Terror.”

Read the Inspector General's report on interrogations (via NYTimes)

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Empowering Women From Oppression to Opportunity

Monday, August 24, 2009

What are the biggest moral challenges we face today? We're joined by two people who have given a lot of thought to cultural challenges around the world, including poverty, racism, and the systematic oppression of women. Nick Kristof is a columnist for The New York Times, and his wife Sheryl WuDunn a former New York Times correspondent.

They are authors of the new book “Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide,” and wrote the article in Sunday’s New York Times Magazine, "The Women's Crusade."

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Afghanistan: Obama's Vietnam?

Monday, August 24, 2009

We're joined by Peter Baker, White House correspondent for The New York Times, to talk about similarities between the continued war in Afghanistan and other ill-defined conflicts in America's past. He outlines this in his article for The New York Times, "Could Afghanistan Become Obama's Vietnam?

 

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Former CIA Director on Prison Abuse, Oil's "Monopoly"

Monday, August 24, 2009

We're looking ahead to today's release of a 2004 report by the CIA inspector general that details harsh interrogation techniques used in CIA prisons. The report is said to contain details of techniques used in  secret CIA prisons, including threatening an al-Qaeda inmate with an electric drill and a gun. We speak to former CIA Director James Woolsey about what he thinks the CIA will do as the reporrt is released, as well as his post-CIA interest in green energy and the national security implications of "oil's monopoly over transportation."

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No More Cash for Clunkers

Monday, August 24, 2009

Having run out of money two weeks ahead of schedule, the Cash for Clunkers program officially ends at 8 p.m. tonight.  Now that it's winding down, how are car dealers and automakers going to get people to come in and buy cars without the $4500 incentive?

We speak to Bill Underriner, owner of Underriner Autos in Billings, Montana; and Mark LaNeve, vice president of sales for General Motors.

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Health Care Reform: What Doctors Want

Monday, August 24, 2009

All this week, we'll be hosting mini-roundtable discussions about how health care reform could affect different groups of Americans. We kick it off this week with one of the groups who stands to be the most affected by any systematic reform: doctors themselves.

With us today are Dr. Kevin Pho, a primary care physician in Nashua, New Hampshire who also blogs at KevinMD.com, Dr. Charles Prestigiacomo, a neurosurgeon and associate professor at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, and Dr. Tyeese Gaines Reid, who is currently in her third year as an emergency care resident at Yale-New Haven Hospital in New Haven, Connecticut.

For more on the doctors from today's roundtable continue reading...

Click here to access the other round tables in this series

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More Moms Drinking and Driving

Monday, August 24, 2009

For our family segment, we take a look at a recent government report that shows a 30 percent increase in the number of women arrested for drinking and driving in the past ten years. This report comes out amidst a vigorous discussion in the blogosphere about mothers who drink. Are mothers more stressed out than they used to be, or has the feminist movement made it more socially acceptable to drink than a couple of generations ago?

To discuss this we speak to Lisa Belkin, writer of the New York Times' MotherLode blog; and Tara Trower, assistant features editor at the Austin American Statesman and writer for the Statesman's Mama Drama blog.

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After 20 Years, Reinstating Rose?

Monday, August 24, 2009

Today marks an anniversary in baseball that is not exactly celebratory. Pete Rose, Major League Baseball’s all-time hits leader, was banned from the game 20 years ago for gambling on baseball games while managing the Cincinnati Reds.

For 14 years, Rose repeatedly denied gambling until he finally admitted to what many had suspected for years: that he'd bet on baseball games, including games played by the Reds. We talk to sports contributor Ibrahim Abdul-Matin for his thoughts on the man known as "Charlie Hustle" and whether or not it's time for him to be allowed back into eligibility for the Baseball Hall of Fame.

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This Week's Agenda with Marcus Mabry and Jonathan Marcus

Monday, August 24, 2009

For this week's agenda segment, Marcus Mabry from The New York Times, and the BBC’s Jonathan Marcus look at the next chapter in the health care debate, growth of the GDP, and how questions about the Afghan presidential elections will be resolved.

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The Obamas Head to Martha's Vineyard

Monday, August 24, 2009

After a summer of rough-and-tumble town halls, the president and his family are taking some time away from Washington to relax. The first family will spend the week on Martha’s Vineyard before returning to D.C. to resume wrangling with legislators. We’ll look at what the Obamas may do while there, and talk about how other presidents have spent their downtime.

We speak to John Fortier, a research fellow at the American Enterprise Institute; retired Associated Press reporter Larry Knutson, who has covered presidential vacations; and Carol McManus, owner and operator of Espresso Love café on Martha's Vineyard (and inventor of "The Obama Muffin").

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Report on CIA Abuses to be Released

Monday, August 24, 2009

In 2004, CIA Inspector General John Helgerson completed a report looking at abuses inside CIA prisons.  The report has been kept a secret until today, when portions of the report are expected to be made public. 

For more on the details of that report, we speak to Siobhan Gorman, intelligence correspondent for the Wall Street Journal and Art Keller, a former CIA case officer who served in Pakistan in 2006.

You can read Siobhan's article, "CIA Faulted for Conduct at Prisons," at the Wall Street Journal, and Art Keller's blog post on secrecy and political accountability around Washington and the CIA, "The Buck Stops Where?"

A CIA inspector's report scheduled for release TODAY [MONDAY] is expected to shine NEW light onto harsh interrogation tactics used at CIA secret prisons.

For more on that report we're here with Siobahn [shuh-VAHN] Gorman, Intelligence Correspondent for the Wall Street Journal. And we've also got Art Keller, a former CIA case officer. He served in Pakistan in 2006.

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Practical Economics: Dogs, Cats, & Shoes

Friday, August 07, 2009

Unemployment numbers are due out this morning and economic analyst Lakshman Achuthan, Managing Director of the Economic Cycle Research Institute, joins us with his predictions. In April, Lakshman predicted that we’d be coming out of the recession this summer. We wanted to road test some of your ideas, so The Takeaway's Femi Oke went looking in unusual places for indications on how the economy is doing. First stop: the ASPCA in New York City, where the rates of pet adoptions tend to follow people's economic well-being. Could the dogs here give us a peek at which direction the economy is going?

Next stop: Wall Street, but not to visit the banks. Instead, Femi spoke with cobbler Minas Polychronakis, who for over 30 years has been repairing shoes for rich and poor alike.

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The Audacity of Hops

Thursday, July 30, 2009

As the president prepares to host a kegger to smooth the feathers ruffled over the arrest of Harvard Professor Henry Louis Gates Jr, the nation's beer drinkers are paying close attention. The Takeaway's Femi Oke has hit the bars (for research, naturally) to find out whether conflict is best resolved over a beer. Then Brooklyn Brewery's Beer Master, Garrett Oliver, adds his thoughts on the president's beer selection: Budweiser, Blue Moon, and Red Stripe. No Brooklyn Lager, Mr. President?

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On-scene Report: Tehran in Turmoil

Thursday, June 18, 2009

After days of protest over the disputed presidential election that kept President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad in power in Iran, demonstrators are once again taking to the streets. To give us an onscene report, we are joined by Babak Dehghanpisheh, Middle East Correspondent for Newsweek, who is in Tehran.

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Fly Me to the Moon (But Let's Go Coach)

Thursday, June 18, 2009

NASA is set to blast off probes on Thursday in a lunar exploration mission to scout water sources and landing sites in anticipation of humans' return to the moon. NASA was hoping to send astronauts to the moon by 2020 for the first visit since 1972. But these lunar visions are delayed by the most terrestrial of concerns: money. We are joined by Miles O'Brien, a science and aviation reporter, and The Takeaway's go-to spaceman for more on the future of space travel.

To see what space exploration is all about, watch the video below.

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The Iran Crisis: Taking to the Streets

Thursday, June 18, 2009

Our partners at the BBC are reporting that "eyewitnesses in Tehran say that thousands of people, many dressed in black, have gathered in a square in the south of the city." Joining The Takeaway this morning and following the protests closely is Professor Hamid Dabashi, Professor of Iranian Studies at Columbia and the author of Iran: A People Interrupted and Islamic Liberation Theology: Resisting the Empire.

View scenes from the protests in Iran in the video below.

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