Streams

Femi Oke

News host and Reporter for The Takeaway

Femi Oke appears in the following:

Representative Barbara Lee on her meeting with Fidel Castro

Wednesday, April 08, 2009

Signaling its willingness to discuss improved relations with the United States under the Obama administration, Havana welcomed a contingent from the Congressional Black Caucus. On the agenda? The relationship between the two countries, but also an audience with Fidel Castro. Three members of the Congressional Black Caucus were the first American officials to meet with Fidel Castro since he fell ill in 2006. Representative Barbara Lee (D-Cal), Chair of the Congressional Black Conference, joins The Takeaway to report on the state of the relationship between Cuba and the U.S. and the state of health of Fidel Castro.

Click through for the transcript.

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American Violet: A story of race, drugs and Texas justice

Wednesday, April 08, 2009

In 2000, in the tiny Central Texas town of Hearne, a military-style drug sweep sent 27 people to jail on felony charges of distributing crack cocaine. Nearly all of them were African American. One of them was Regina Kelly, who at the time was a 24-year-old waitress and single mother of four who refused to plead guilty. The film American Violet, a dramatization of the events in Hearne, will be released next week. The Takeaway talks to Bill Haney, the writer and producer of the film, and Nicole Beharie who stars in the movie.

Want to see the trailer? Here it is:

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A look back at six months of stimulus with the Congressional Oversight Panel

Wednesday, April 08, 2009

It’s been six months, almost to the day, since the TARP stimulus package was put into law. Last night, the Congressional Oversight Panel charged with monitoring the use of those funds and making sure the Treasury makes the right moves to stabilize the economy and the nation’s financial sector, issued a new report spelling out how the federal government is doing. The Takeaway's Todd Zwillich is here to give us a quick overview and we are pleased to have Richard Neiman, a member of the Congressional Oversight Panel, and the New York State Superintendent of Banks, joining us in the studio.

Click through for the transcript.

"We were at a precipice. We were at a risk of financial collapse. We averted that through those actions and now it's up to us to continue to focus on expanding the economy and to get the banks lending."
—Richard Neiman of the Congressional Oversight Panel on helping the economy

For more about the COP, here is a video they just released to accompany their report called Assessing Treasury's Strategy: Six Months of TARP.

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Moral of the story

Wednesday, April 08, 2009

For years, ethicist Randy Cohen has patiently guided readers through moral quagmires in his weekly column in the New York Times "The Ethicist." Now he is branching out from his popular Sunday column and is bringing his moral view to a new arena: The news. He will cast his ethical gaze on hot topics and in the news and discuss their broader moral implications. Randy Cohen joins The Takeaway to discuss his take on Madonna's failed adoption of a little girl in Malawi.

Check out Randy Cohen's column, Moral of the Story, in today's New York Times.

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NCAA graduation rates reveal stark racial disparity

Wednesday, April 08, 2009

It’s not surprising that after the bright lights fade from the floor of the Final Four championship games some college basketball players dream of going pro. But if you don't go pro, what do you do? The NCAA has tried in recent years to make it clear that they value academic success as much as athletics, but a new study reveals that their efforts may not be working. At least not among black male athletes. A recent study by The University of Florida’s Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sports reveals that the statistics are bleak: White male student athletes graduate at 80 percent versus only 58 percent of their black teammates. Michigan State had the greatest disparity in graduation rates among the Sweet 16 teams: All of its white players graduated, but only 43 percent of the black players got a diploma. Two colleges—Arizona and Gonzaga—didn’t graduate any black players at all. Some teams are doing better, the NCAA Basketball Champions, UNC, graduated 80 percent of its black players. And African American women in the tournament graduated at a rate of 78 percent. Joining us to discuss these troubling statistics is Dr. Boyce Watkins, professor of finance at Syracuse University and founder of YourBlackWorld.com.

The NCAA has been promoting academics through PSAs like this one:


Would this make you stay in school with the lure of an NBA salary?

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How much information is too much information?

Wednesday, April 08, 2009

A lot of information is available online. Whether it is on Facebook, Twitter or your blog, there may be some details about your life that you don't want your kids to know about. Where do you draw the line? Or has a parent told you something that you wish they hadn't?

What's your take? Listen to the best comments after the jump, or leave a comment below.
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Beyond short-selling: A look at SEC reform

Wednesday, April 08, 2009

Today the Securities and Exchange Commission will unveil several proposals aimed at restricting short-selling—a technique used by investors to profit from falling stock prices by selling at one price and then buying back at a lower price. While it has thus far been legal, it is widely considered underhanded. That may all change with the SEC's new rules. But there are many issues at the SEC that could also use revision, problems that go far beyond short-selling. The Takeaway is taking a broad look at SEC reform with John Coffee, a professor at Columbia Law School and director of that school’s Center on Corporate Governance.

"In periods of market stress, short sellers can create a self-fulfilling prophecy by putting the market under pressure and causing other shareholders to fear futher price declines."
—John coffee of Columbia Law School on short-selling

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March unemployment numbers show increase in job losses

Friday, April 03, 2009

New unemployment numbers out today reveal that the U.S. economy lost 663,000 jobs in March and jobless rate jumps to 8.5 percent, the highest since late 1983. The U.S. continued to shed jobs at an unrelenting clip in March, pushing total losses since the recession started 16 months ago past five million. The figures are a sober reality check on the economy after some mildly encouraging news on housing, automobiles and manufacturing. But on hearing the news, the markets jumped. So what do the numbers really mean? We turn to Kelly Evans, an economics reporter for the Wall Street Journal.

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Lessons of self-control via Warren Buffett's weight-loss plan

Friday, April 03, 2009

Investor Warren Buffett’s financial wizardry is a mix of shrewd analysis and a steely self-control, which keeps his instincts in check when panic claims Wall Street. But when the numbers indicate an uptick in his weight, the Oracle of Omaha cashes in his mid-western pragmatism for some wacky weight management ways. Behavioral Economist Dan Ariely says that Warren Buffett’s weight loss program offers an object lesson in self-control. He joins us from Duke University where he is the James B. Duke Professor of Behavioral Economics. He is also the author of Predictably Irrational.

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Ford CEO Alan Mullaly joins The Takeaway

Friday, April 03, 2009

Last year the CEOs of the Big Three of the American car industry went to Congress seeking financial assistance. When it became clear that Congress was only offering short-term loans with a lot of strings attached, GM and Chrysler had no choice, but to accept the deal. Ford, however, walked away without taking the loan. Since then, as GM and Chrysler struggle to survive in the economy, Ford has been going it alone. But that doesn't mean Ford is in an entirely happy place. To survive they've had to sell off brands such as Jaguar, Land Rover, Aston Martin and are talking about putting Volvo up on the auction block. We've asked our listeners to send in their questions as The Takeaway talks to Ford CEO Alan Mulally.

TRANSCRIPT:

JOHN HOCKENBERRY: Living on the edge. Edge is so ‘90s, but Ford's new product line is rolling out as the automaker is enjoying something of a dream moment. In the midst of a life or death crisis for General Motors and Chrysler and a near nationalization of those companies, Ford has been quietly going it alone. So far it has said it doesn't need Federal bailout money. But that doesn't mean Ford is absolutely in a happy place financially. Last year, Ford made its biggest ever annual loss, despite the sale of Jaguar and Land Rover. Now, it’s in talks to sell off its Swedish subsidiary, Volvo. Joining us now is Alan Mulally. He’s CEO of the Ford Motor Company. He joins me now from Ford headquarters in Dearborn, Michigan. Mister Mulally, thanks so much for being with us.

ALAN MULALLY: You’re welcome. Good morning to you, John.

JOHN HOCKENBERRY: My first question to you is that a lot has been made of the fact that Ford’s dodging the bullet here is not so much a matter of management, as it is a matter of timing. In the fact that you had a reversal of fortunes about two and a half years ago and arranged a credit line that has really been beneficial right now. Is it a more a matter of timing or more a matter of management savvy that’s really gotten you to this point?

Continue reading the transcript...

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Is Mexico gaining ground in the fight against drug cartels?

Friday, April 03, 2009

Yesterday, Mexican federal police arrested Vicente Leyva, one of the country's most wanted men. That's the third arrest of a suspected drug cartel power player in as many weeks. Leyva is allegedly the number two man in a family-run cartel based in the violent city of Ciudad Juarez. Does the bust mean Mexico is finally getting ahead of drug traffickers? The Takeaway talks to Laura Carlsen, Director of the Americas Program at the Center for International Policy.

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The G-20 wrap up

Friday, April 03, 2009

We started the week leading up to the G-20 by speaking with Dan Price, a former international economics assistant to President Bush who was responsible for setting up last year's meeting of the Group of 20 and is in London for this year's. We return to him now for his take on the summit, whether a trillion dollars is enough for the IMF, and the hope for a coordinated response to the global economic crisis.

"The globe is coming around to the view that just as the recovery can't be done on the backs of any single economy, so too, you can't really have a global trade agreement unless you have the major emerging economies as well as the developed economies making significant commitments."
—Dan Price, former assistant to President Bush, on the world economy

To hear Dan Price's earlier interview, click here.

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Where you at? Foursquare maps it out

Friday, April 03, 2009

There’s a new web tool that’s getting a lot of buzz right now called Foursquare. It's a program that encourages you to “check in” with the system whenever you go to an interesting – or mundane! – place with your cell phone. This sends an alert to your friends telling them where you are and what you are doing. It may sound like that other tool that is hogging the news feed these days – Twitter – but it’s not. There are no pithy comments or creativity required. You just passively check in and all your friends find out. But our friend and blogger, Scott Lamb, thinks this simple act of finding out what people are doing also makes the world a better place. He is the senior editor at Buzzfeed and he joins us to discuss this new trend.

For more, read Scott Lamb's blog post, The absurd satisfaction of playing Foursquare.
Related:
The absurd satisfaction of playing foursquare
Playing with radio: Behind the scenes of The Takeaway's "Where are you?" game
What are you doing right now?
The thrill of checking in with our listeners

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G-20 summit shows global unity to fight recession

Friday, April 03, 2009

Before heading off to celebrate NATO's 60th birthday, world leaders heralded the show of unity at the G-20 summit. Their strong showing lifted global markets and mapped out a new future for financial regulation. Despite struggling to bridge deep divides over how to revive a paralyzed global economy, the leaders of the world’s largest economies agreed Thursday to bail out developing countries, stimulate world trade and regulate financial firms more stringently. For a recap of the outcome of the G-20 we turn to George Parker, political editor for the Financial Times.

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And then there were Four: It's the NCAA Finals!

Friday, April 03, 2009

It may be April, but that doesn't March Madness is over. The Final Four (and we're not talking about Battlestar Galactica for once) of the NCAA men’s college basketball tournament is on Saturday in Detroit, Michigan and with Michigan State in the Final Four, it should be a raucous show down. Standing in their way to a title? Villanova, UNC, and UConn. For the women it's perfect UConn vs. Stanford and Louisville vs. Oklahoma. UConn is favored, but Stanford just might pull it out. Here to tell us all about the match ups and what we have to look forward to this weekend is sports blogger, Ibrahim Abdul-Matin.

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Aid agencies in Afghanistan see cause for concern

Friday, April 03, 2009

International aid organizations are expected to release a report today outlining their concerns over the expected troop surge in Afghanistan. This report comes as world leaders are gathered to celebrate NATO's 60th birthday party and President Obama is expected to ask NATO allies to contribute more troops to Afghanistan. But the western aid agencies are worried that more troops will lead to more civilian casualties, a big problem in the effort to win over the Afghan population. To explain their concerns over President Obama's plan is Matt Waldman is head of policy at Oxfam International in Kabul, Afghanistan.

"This is not only about security and military objectives, this is also about the Afghan people and providing a better life for them."
—Matt Waldman head of policy at Oxfam International on aid to Afghanistan

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Jobless in the U.S.A.

Friday, April 03, 2009

The unemployment numbers are cold and hard: The national unemployment rate hit 8.1 percent in February, the highest it has been in over 25 years. And there are other parts of the country where the figure is a good bit higher pushing twelve or thirteen percent. As we wait for the release of the March unemployment numbers, we talk to two of the faces behind the numbers. John Fox is from an area of North Carolina, where the unemployment rate is 15.7 percent and he has been looking for work in the construction field for over thirteen months. Also joining the conversation is Janet from New York City who just found a new job after a lengthy search. Dan Gross, senior editor at Newsweek and columnist at Slate, gives us some perspective on the numbers.

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David Sanger's guide to the G-20

Thursday, April 02, 2009

Our friend David Sanger, Chief Washington Correspondent for the New York Times and author of The Inheritance: The World Obama Confronts and the Challenges to American Power, is at the G-20 summit in London. He joins us with a road map of the leaders, the proposed options, the possible outcomes, and his own suggestion for the Presidential ipod.

For more, read his article with Mark Landler, Global Leaders Meeting to Resolve Rift on Economic Plan in today's New York Times.

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G-20 sets eyes on saving the global economy

Thursday, April 02, 2009

Leaders at the G-20 represent 85% of the global economy. And there are possibly as many financial rescue plans as there are world leaders at the summit. One option has Germany and France pushing the U.S. to accept global financial regulations that could reach well inside American borders. Helping us to make sense of what's happening at the G-20 today is The New York Times' Mark Landler who is in the Excel Center in London, where the meeting is taking place.

For more, read Mark Landler's and David Sanger's article, Global Leaders Meeting to Resolve Rift on Economic Plan, in today's New York Times.

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Birding gets a digital upgrade

Thursday, April 02, 2009

Starting in 1882 and continuing for almost a century, the United State's Bird Migration Program collected two-by-five notecards from bird watchers around North America. Today, these long preserved cards — did we mention that there were over six million of them? — are being dusted off, in the hopes that they can tell us something about a bird of a different feather: climate change. Jessica Zelt, coordinator of the newly established North American Bird Phenology Program where she is in charge of digitizing the cards, joins the show to tell us more.

Are you itchin' to get your hands on a little American history? You can transcribe the migration notecards into the digital directory from your very own home. Click here to help! Go on, be a part of bird history.

For more, read Molly Webster's Producer's Note

And before we let you go, we'd like to leave you with a little bird quote from our friends here at the Internet, because really, what's the World Wide Web good for if not to root-out some profound, bird-related witticisms? Ahem: "My favorite weather is bird-chirping weather." ~Loire Hartwould

(c) USGS.gov

(c) USGS.gov

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