Streams

Erik Beith

Erik Beith appears in the following:

Donna Summer: I Feel Love

Friday, December 21, 2012

In 1977 Donna Summer released a single that changed the sound of dance music forever. It abandoned disco’s funky roots in favor of a driving electronic pulse. Summer’s voice was the only thing on “I Feel Love” not created by a synthesizer, recalls the song’s composer, Giorgio Moroder ...

Video: "I Feel Love" (Live)

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Sons of the Pioneers: Tumbling Tumbleweeds

Wednesday, January 25, 2012

The Sons of the Pioneers pioneered one of the strangest branches of American music: singing cowboys.  Their 1934 song “Tumbling Tumbleweeds,” made popular by a Gene Autry film of the same name, was written by Bob Nolan, a Canadian by birth who ...

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Professor Longhair: Tipitina

Friday, January 20, 2012

The New Orleans piano player Henry Roeland Byrd made a name for himself as Professor Longhair, a former street hustler turned self-taught musician who started recording in his early 30s. In 1953 Atlantic records released "Tipitina." “As a kid you heard that song seven or eight times ...

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Captain Beefheart: Trout Mask Replica

Friday, January 13, 2012

Trout Mask Replica (1969) is part free jazz, part blues, part beat poetry. Frank Zappa (who gave singer-songwriter Don van Vliet the name Captain Beefheart) produced the album. “It sounds like it's been made up on the spot,” describes Mike Barnes, van Vliet’s biographer. “But in fact it was ...

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Phonautogram

Friday, January 06, 2012

Did you know there are audio recordings that predate Thomas Edison's phonograph by almost 20 years? The phonautogram was invented by a Frenchman named Eduoard Leon-Scott and patented in 1857, translating sound waves (shakily) onto sheets of paper. But for the last century ...

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Morton Subotnick: Silver Apples of the Moon

Thursday, December 23, 2010

Morton Subotnick's Silver Apples of the Moon, was the first album of all-electronic music. Released in 1967, it found favor with electronics geeks, as well as legions of stoners who soaked in its mind-blowing sounds.

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Loretta Lynn: Coal Miner's Daughter

Thursday, December 23, 2010

This hit country song was written in 1970 by Loretta Lynn. With her plaintive, but proud voice, Lynn tells the story of growing up poor in the Appalachian Mountains of Kentucky. Lynn, Nashville veteran Harold Ray Bradley, and Jack White of The White Stripes explain what makes the song a classic.

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R.E.M.: Radio Free Europe

Thursday, December 23, 2010

"Radio Free Europe" was R.E.M.'s first single. It represents a breakthrough moment, when indie rock was splitting away from punk music to become its own sound. Engineer Mitch Easter, radio manager Mike Henry, and R.E.M.’s Mike Mills look back.

Bonus Track: R.E.M. Live at Tyrone's O.C. (1981)

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Howlin' Wolf: Smokestack Lightning

Thursday, December 23, 2010

The first song in our series is Howlin’ Wolf’s "Smokestack Lightning," a cornerstone of Chicago Blues. Howlin' Wolf's daughter and his longtime guitarist Hubert Sumlin talk about the importance of his music.

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The 2,000 Year Old Man

Thursday, December 24, 2009

This 1961 comedy routine by Mel Brooks and Carl Reiner is about a man so old, he once knew Jesus — personally — and dated Joan of Arc. Billy Crystal and Rob Reiner explain why "2000 Year-Old Man" will live forever.

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George Jones: He Stopped Loving Her Today

Thursday, December 24, 2009

One of this year's selections is a song so sad that George Jones was initially reluctant to record it. Yet it became one of the most popular songs in country music. 

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Carmen Miranda: O Que è Que a Bahiana Tem

Thursday, December 24, 2009

This samba was recorded by the Brazilian singer Carmen Miranda in 1939. Dori Caymmi, the son of the songwriter, and biographer Martha Gil-Montero explain how the song brought Brazilian music to the global marketplace — with unforeseen consequences for Miranda.

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Link Wray: Rumble

Thursday, December 24, 2009

This guitar instrumental altered the course of rock music. The story of Link Wray and "Rumble," from 1958, is told by guitarist Steven Van Zandt, bassist James Hutchinson, and writer Brian Wright-McLeod.

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John Lee Hooker: Boogie Chillen

Thursday, December 24, 2009

Our series begins with John Lee Hooker's breakthrough song "Boogie Chillen". Blues veteran Charlie Musselwhite and writer Peter Guralnick explain how Hooker's 1948 song left its mark on American music.

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