Streams

Elizabeth Englander

Professor of Psychology and Director of the Massachusetts Aggression Reduction Center

Elizabeth Englander appears in the following:

An App That Fights Cyberbullying

Friday, February 07, 2014

A New Jersey school district will be the first to roll out the STOPit app, which seeks to get adults to intervene in cyberbullying before it's too late. Dr. Scott Taylor, superintendent of the Kenilworth School District and Dr. Elizabeth Englander, director of the Massachusetts Aggression Reduction Center at Bridgewater State University discuss what this means for kids and the fight against bullying.

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Please Explain: Bullying

Friday, March 30, 2012

Bullying is commonplace in schools, but in recent years cyber-bullying, suicides, and school shootings have shown bullying to be a very serious issue. On this week’s Please Explain we’ll find out what constitutes bullying and aggression among children (and adults), its repercussions, and how parents, children, and schools should address it. We’re joined by Elizabeth Englander, Professor of Psychology and Director of the Massachusetts Aggression Reduction Center at Bridgewater State University, and Jessie Klein, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Criminal Justice at Adelphi University, and author of The Bully Society: School Shootings and the Crisis of Bullying in America’s Schools.

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Re-Thinking the American Bully

Thursday, March 10, 2011

From cell phones to Facebook and Twitter to YouTube, the ubiquitous social technology that children and young adults have at their disposal make them both accessible and vulnerable in ways that we could have never imagined just a generation ago. The president and first lady Michelle Obama want to make Americans aware of the new and persistent threat that bullying poses to the our nation's children. Later today, the White House hosts a conference on the prevention of bullying and cyber-bullying. We know that technology is changing the ways that America's young are capable of bullying their peers, but are the ways in which people become participants also changing?

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