Streams

Edward Schumacher-Matos

Edward Schumacher-Matos appears in the following:

Race At NPR And The End Of 'Tell Me More'

Monday, June 30, 2014

The demise of the show dedicated to diversity has provoked listener concerns and internal responses. How's NPR doing? Depends on your measure. Here's a look at the numbers.

Comments [1]

3 Things Everyone Should Know Before Growing Up

Monday, June 30, 2014

Would you like to see the world more clearly? Commentator Tania Lombrozo extracts some useful life lessons from the field of psychology.

Comment

Open Forum

Friday, June 13, 2014

Want to post a comment about something we're not covering? Here's a space for readers to share their thoughts about media, policy and NPR's journalism.

Comment

Open Forum

Wednesday, May 14, 2014

Want to post a comment about something we're not covering? Here's a space for readers to share their thoughts about media, policy and NPR's journalism.

Comment

Open Forum

Monday, April 14, 2014

Want to post a comment about something we're not covering? Here's a space for readers to share their thoughts about media, policy and NPR's journalism.

Comment

Ethics, Morality And A Ticking Clock For How To Report On The R**skins

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

An investigation into how NPR should refer to the Washington team concludes that it is time to pull back on using the team's name. Does anyone believe it won't be toast anyway?

Comment

Open Forum

Friday, March 14, 2014

Want to post a comment about something we're not covering? Here's a space for readers to share their thoughts about media, policy and NPR's journalism.

Comment

Fairness In Covering Israel And The Palestinians: The End Of An Accounting

Sunday, January 19, 2014

Over 11 years, John Felton has reviewed more than 4,000 NPR stories related to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in quarterly reports that form an extraordinary study of American journalism. This is his last one. His summation: some flaws, but that the critics who charge bias really want bias for their side.

Comment

A Fair And Balanced Look At Mara Liasson

Thursday, November 07, 2013

NPR's national political correspondent Mara Liasson is also a contributor to Fox News. Some listeners complain that she has a conservative bias. A review of her work through the contentious political fighting over Syria, the government shutdown, debt default, and health care reform, finds otherwise. She's a remarkably cold-eyed analyst.

Comment

Open Forum

Tuesday, November 05, 2013

Want to post a comment about something we're not covering? Here's a space for readers to share their thoughts about media, policy and NPR's journalism.

Comment

What We Hear When NPR Refers To 'Obamacare'

Friday, September 06, 2013

Republicans invented the term "Obamacare" as a way to denigrate the Affordable Care Act. NPR's hosts and reporters now commonly use the term, prompting the ire of some listeners. Is NPR "letting Fox drive the narrative," as one wrote?

Comment

Open Forum

Friday, September 06, 2013

Want to post a comment about something we're not covering? Here's a space for readers to share their thoughts about media, policy and NPR's journalism.

Comment

S. Dakota Indian Foster Care: Listening To Your Responses

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

Here are some preliminary responses to your comments on the ombudsman process, on sourcing and on the length of my review of an NPR investigation into foster care for Native American children in South Dakota. Many of you wondered what NPR should do next. That is not for me to say, but one officer from the Native American Journalists Association has a suggestion. I also answer a grandmother quoted in the series who called me with a concern about truth.

Comment

S. Dakota Indian Foster Care 1: Investigative Storytelling Gone Awry

Friday, August 09, 2013

An NPR investigation into foster care for American Indian children in South Dakota took on a serious issue but failed in several crucial respects. The series alleged that state social workers took children from their families as a way to get federal funds and put them in white homes out of cultural bias. While acknowledging secondary problems, editors defend the series, which won prizes. I find, however, that it violated NPR's standards because it lacked proof and failed to give the state's side on key points. The series also was characterized by an unfair tone, factual errors, misleading data and inadequate context. It should not have aired as it was. This introduction summarizes a six-chapter report on how not to do investigative storytelling.

Comment

S. Dakota Indian Foster Care 2: Abuse In Taking Children From Families?

Friday, August 09, 2013

The willful taking of American Indian children from their families was presented in the NPR investigation as the baseline of alleged widespread abuse of the foster care system by the state of South Dakota. But the series offered no documented proof, and it failed to fully discuss the centrally relevant matter of child neglect. The series also failed to report that South Dakota reservations have some of the highest levels in the country of alcoholism, drug abuse, violence, teenage pregnancy and similar ills. Many families there are struggling and falling apart.

Comment

S. Dakota Indian Foster Care 3: Filthy Lucre

Friday, August 09, 2013

The NPR investigation into foster care for Native American children in South Dakota sought to follow the money but misused the way federal incentives and bonuses work. The series alleged that state social workers took the children from their families as a way to reap funds for the state, but it gave no proof for this charge, which does not stand up to scrutiny. The weaknesses were covered over with tendentious language and tone.

Comment

S. Dakota Indian Foster Care 4: The Mystery Of A Missing $100 Million

Friday, August 09, 2013

The headline number in the NPR investigation into foster care for Native American children in South Dakota was that the state receives nearly $100 million a year in federal funds. The series alleged that this money — a large amount in a poor state — is driving state abuses of Native American children. Without clearly telling us, however, the $100 million number is poorly sourced and pumped up by including white children and adoptions. The state says it receives less than a quarter of that amount for Indians, even including funds for Medicaid and adoptions. The reporters have not given me information proving the state wrong.

Comment

S. Dakota Indian Foster Care 5: Who Is To Blame For Native Children In White Homes?

Friday, August 09, 2013

The NPR investigation made inflated and misleading allegations that the state of South Dakota systematically puts American Indian children into white foster homes out of a cultural bias reminiscent of old Indian boarding schools. The series failed to report that the tribes' own judges make 40 percent of the foster home placements, often with the involvement of tribal social workers, and that there is an acute shortage of Native American foster homes. The series also ignored a companion program in which Indian children are indeed being put in Indian homes.

Comment

S. Dakota Indian Foster Care 6: Where It All Went Wrong — The Framing

Friday, August 09, 2013

The conceptual basis of NPR's faulty investigation of American Indian foster care in South Dakota was a narrow — and misleading — interpretation of the federal Indian Child Welfare Act. By focusing mostly on the act's call for protecting Indian culture, the series failed to discuss the equally important need to protect children. The series also ignored historic Indian sovereignty issues and changing concepts of race.

Comment

Open Forum

Wednesday, July 31, 2013

Want to post a comment about something we're not covering? Here's a space for readers to share their thoughts about media, policy and NPR's journalism.

Comment