Streams

Dina Temple-Raston

Dina Temple-Raston appears in the following:

Western Fighters Answer Mideast Extremists' Clarion Call

Saturday, June 28, 2014

The road to violent jihad has never been so smooth. Westerners hoping to join the fight in Syria, and now Iraq, can take a flight to Turkey and meet hundreds of rebel groups eager to train them.

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Insurgents Draw Westerners To Battle In Iraq And Syria

Friday, June 27, 2014

Thousands of foreign fighters are joining the fighting in Iraq and Syria. According to U.S. intelligence officials, the flow of foreign fighters includes a hefty contingent from the West. Why are so many Westerners are going, and will they bring the violence they learned abroad back home?

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Behind ISIS Battle In Iraq, A Clash Between Two Arch-Terrorists

Thursday, June 26, 2014

Focusing on Iraq's fight may be missing the point. Under the surface is a more fundamental war between al-Qaida leader Ayman al-Zawahri and Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria.

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ISIS Brings Business Acumen To Violent Jihad

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

ISIS issues annual reports and launched a Twitter app, and its financiers track money flows on spreadsheets. It's professionalized its operations while inflicting more casualties than al-Qaida.

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How Much Does A Terrorist Attack Cost? A Lot Less Than You'd Think

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

A remote-controlled bomb costs as much as an iPhone. Car bombs can cost up to $20,000. So for a cash-rich group like ISIS, the only limit to attacks is the number of people willing to carry them out.

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U.S. Moves To Lock Up ISIS's Abundant War Chest

Friday, June 20, 2014

President Obama plans to slow the momentum of an extremist group that has seized much of northern Iraq. The group has funds that will permit it to sponsor attacks that could be aimed at the West.

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Behind ISIS, A Masked Man Known More By Brutality Than By Name

Monday, June 16, 2014

The man who is leading the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria in its offensive across Iraq is a mysterious figure. His nom de guerre is Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, but no one seems to agree on his real name or even what he looks like today. But he and ISIS have become a force that has taken key Iraqi cities and threatens to unleash a sectarian civil war.

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Using Social Media, Jihadi Groups Stay On Message

Thursday, June 05, 2014

The Bowe Bergdahl exchange video released by the Taliban is the latest propaganda coup for jihadis on social media. Social media benefits jihadi groups because it is all about immediacy, not accuracy. Social media is changing the nature of jihad for young fighters as well. Some jihadis boast thousands of Twitter followers and are broadcasting their jihad for all to see.

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Former Taliban Ministers Leave Guantanamo, Trailed By Questions

Tuesday, June 03, 2014

A debate has arisen recently over the release of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl: Did the U.S. negotiate with terrorists to win his release, or was this the kind of commonplace prisoner swap that comes in the final months of a war? The five men released in exchange for Bergdahl's safe return weren't common fighters; they were members of the Taliban government. And the arrangements of their release could offer a template for how to close the prison at Guantanamo Bay.

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The Jewish Kid From New Jersey Who Became A Radical Islamist

Friday, April 25, 2014

Yousef al-Khattab was born Jewish but became a Muslim and put extremist propaganda on the Web. On the eve of sentencing for terrorism charges, he tells NPR his actions were "stupid" and "wrong."

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Neither Confirm Nor Deny

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

How a sunken nuclear submarine, a crazy billionaire, and a mechanical claw gave birth to a phrase that has hounded journalists and lawyers for 40 years and embodies the tension between the public’s desire for transparency and the government’s need to keep secrets.  


 

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Yemeni Officials Claim To Have Foiled Al-Qaida Terror Plot

Wednesday, August 07, 2013

Days after the U.S. announced it would close its diplomatic missions across the Middle East and Africa, Yemeni security officials said that they had foiled a plot by al-Qaeda to attack fuel pipelines and two of the nation's ports. It is unclear if this plot is the same as the one that was alluded to in al-Qaeda communications U.S. intelligence officials intercepted earlier this month.

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What You Need To Know About Al-Qaeda Today

Wednesday, August 07, 2013

With this week's terror alerts bringing al-Qaeda back into the spotlight, Dina Temple-Raston, NPR Counterterrorism and National Security correspondent, discusses the state of the organization, and why Yemen continues to be a hotspot.

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Intercepted Al-Qaida Communication Prompts Warnings

Tuesday, August 06, 2013

The State Department on Tuesday advised all U.S. citizens to leave Yemen because of "extremely high" danger there. This comes as 19 U.S. embassies and consulates remain closed across much of the Middle East and Africa because of a security threat. Al-Qaida chatter picked up by intelligence sources suggested a major attack was in the works.

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Interpol Asks For Help Tracking Escaped Al-Qaida Inmates

Monday, August 05, 2013

Interpol has issued a global alert asking for help tracking hundreds of terrorism suspects who have escaped from prisons over the past month. The global police organization's alert came just days after the State Department announced that it is closing nearly two dozen diplomatic missions in a roster of Muslim countries. But officials say the two security alerts aren't directly related.

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Iraq Prison Break Worries Counterterrorism Officials

Thursday, July 25, 2013

Al-Qaida operations around the world have used prison breaks as a method to beef up their ranks. Al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, the terrorist group's arm in Yemen, came into being shortly after a 2006 prison break. That history explains why officials are so worried about a jailbreak this week in Iraq. More than 400 prisoners are thought to have escaped, and many of them are key operatives with the group al-Qaida in Iraq.

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How Secret Does A Secret Court Need To Be?

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, or FISA court, is the legal body that decides whether wiretaps and other surveillance methods used by the intelligence community are legal. Officials seem to agree that the procedures need to be more transparent, but how that would happen is anything but clear.

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'Guardian' Releases More Documents On NSA Surveillance

Friday, June 21, 2013

Two documents provide new details about the procedures the National Security Agency follows when sifting huge volumes of email. The Justice Department documents were made public by The Guardian newspaper. They help explain the steps the NSA must follow when it inadvertently comes across the communications of Americans.

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NSA Leaker Snowden Defends Actions In Live Web Chat

Monday, June 17, 2013

The man who leaked secret National Security Agency documents, Edward Snowden, defended his decision to reveal details of U.S. surveillance programs in a web chat on Monday. Snowden said he's still in Hong Kong and claims he wouldn't get a fair trial in the U.S. He also said he has not been in contact with the Chinese government and that there are more disclosures to come.

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FISA Court Appears To Be Rubber Stamp For Government Requests

Thursday, June 13, 2013

The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court has been under fire since one of its classified orders was leaked by a former National Security Agency analyst. Detractors have focused on the fact that nearly all the warrant applications brought before its judges have been approved.

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