Streams

David Sanger

David Sanger appears in the following:

North Korea Nuclear Progress Greater Than Expected

Wednesday, December 15, 2010

North Korea seems to have surpassed Iran, in its efforts to develop the advanced technology that produces nuclear material and weapons. According to David Sanger, chief White House correspondent for our partner The New York Times, senior American officials were recently stunned to see that North Korea is far more advanced in its nuclear ambitions than anticipated. The officials visited a new plant at Yongbyon, where North Korea's main nuclear complex sits.

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Wikileaks Documents Shed Light on US-Pakistani Relations

Wednesday, December 01, 2010

Among the State Department cables leaked on WikiLeaks and analyzed in The New York Times were messages from the U.S. Ambassador to Pakistan about the country's nuclear fuel resources. In a cable dating May 27, 2009, Amb. Anne W. Pateron reported her concern over a stockpile of highly enriched uranium, which had been sitting for years near an aging research nuclear reactor in Pakistan. There was enough to build several “dirty bombs” or, in skilled hands, possibly enough for an actual nuclear bomb.

The cables show that underneath public assurances lie deep clashes over strategic goals on issues like Pakistan’s support for the Afghan Taliban and tolerance of Al Qaida.

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WikiLeaks Cables Reveal Iran's Nuclear Capacity

Monday, November 29, 2010

Secret diplomatic cables obtained by whistle-blower organization WikiLeaks shed new light on the global nuclear standoff with Iran. The documents reveal for the first time that the U.S. believes Iran has obtained nineteen powerful, Russian-designed missiles from North Korea. Their range is long enough to strike Western Europe. Will this change the way the country is seen and dealt with by its neighbors?  

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WQXR's The Washington Report

Monday, November 29, 2010

NYT's David Sanger discusses the 250,000 leaked diplomatic cables published by Wikileaks and analysed by the New York Times.

The Big Picture: Iraq and Afghanistan

Tuesday, October 12, 2010

On this week’s edition of The Big Picture, a look at why our military involvement in Iraq and Afghanistan has not been more of an issue on the campaign trail during this election season. David Sanger, Chief Washington Correspondent for the New York Times, explains what the official withdrawal of combat troops from Iraq and the increase in the number of troops in Afghanistan has meant for candidates and voters so far this year.

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WQXR's The Washington Report

Monday, September 13, 2010

David Sanger joins Kerry Nolan to discuss why a Republican compromise on middle-class tax cuts is not a sign of rekindled bipartisanship in Washington.

WQXR's The Washington Report

Monday, September 06, 2010

David Sanger joins Kerry Nolan to discuss the August jobless numbers, new government stimulus proposals, and how the new round of Middle East peace talks are dealing with the key issues facing the conflict.

The President's Speech and America's Future Role in the Middle East

Wednesday, September 01, 2010

President Obama declared the end of combat operations in Iraq last night. David Sanger, chief Washington correspondent for The New York Times, analyzes President Obama's address from the Oval Office last night, and explains what it reveals about the future of the U.S. in the Middle East. Sanger says that Obama's speech was interesting for its message that the commitments in Iraq and Afghanistan are not open-ended, and that there are bigger priorities at home, including the economy and job creation.

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WQXR's The Washington Report

Monday, August 30, 2010

David Sanger joins Kerry Nolan to discuss the upcoming middle east peace talks, as well as the Fed's announcement it will take additional steps to prevent a double-dip recession.

WQXR's The Washington Report

Monday, August 23, 2010

David Sanger, of The NYT, weighs in on U.S. combat troops pulling out of Iraq and why Pres. Obama is getting heat for going on vacation.

A Nuclear Iran May Be Further Away than Previously Thought

Friday, August 20, 2010

It's a simple question with an infinitely complicated answer: what happens if Iran is able to build a nuclear weapon?

Russia is expected to deliver low-enriched uranium to Tehran to bring the Bushehr reactor, Iran's first nuclear power station, online. And the U.S., Israel and other nations are reportedly on alert, as hawks are calling for the bombing the reactor before the fuel is loaded into it.

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WQXR's The Washington Report

Monday, August 16, 2010

David Sanger, of The NYT, talks about Obama's stance on NYC's planned Islamic cultural center and mosque, and Gates' comments on recent North Korean aggression.

WQXR's The Washington Report

Monday, August 09, 2010

David Sanger, of The NYT, on troop levels in Afghanistan, the BP oil spill, Elena Kagan and the House jobs bill.

WQXR's The Washington Report

Monday, August 02, 2010

David Sanger, of The NYT, on the politics of the auto bailout and the fall-out of last week's Wiki-Leaks.

WQXR's The Washington Report

Monday, July 26, 2010

David Sanger, of The NYT, on how 91,000 top secret military documents were leaked.

WQXR's The Washington Report

Monday, July 19, 2010

David Sanger, of The NYT, on spies, national intelligence and unemployment benefits.

WQXR's The Washington Report

Monday, July 12, 2010

David Sanger, of The NYT, on the spy swap, deficit reduction and BP.

David Sanger on Iran Sanctions

Monday, June 14, 2010

David Sanger, chief Washington correspondent for The New York Times, discusses the UN Security Council vote to impose further sanctions on Iran – and what the effects of sanctions are.

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WQXR's The Washington Report

Monday, June 07, 2010

David Sanger, of The NYT, on how BP's spill will affect the White House long-term, and on divers who were killed by Israel's Navy off Gaza's coast.

The President's Ever-Growing To Do List

Friday, June 04, 2010

No one can deny that President Obama’s current “to do” list has grown dramatically of late, with each new item seemingly demanding higher precedence than the item before it. With two wars, unemployment, the Middle East Crisis and the oil spill, how does one person manage this kind of agenda?

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