Streams

David Krasnow

Executive Producer, The New Yorker Radio Hour

David oversees The New Yorker Radio Hour for WNYC Studios.  He was for many years the senior editor of Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen, where he directed the Peabody Award-winning series “American Icons.” Born and raised in Brooklyn, New York, he previously worked as a music critic, freelance producer, magazine editor, and pizza cook.

David Krasnow appears in the following:

Missed Connections for A-Holes

Friday, August 26, 2016

These are missed connections you’ll be glad you missed.  

Lois Lowry: The End of 'The Giver'

Thursday, July 07, 2016

Lois Lowry’s “The Giver” was one of the first dystopian YA novels — and one of the most banned. 

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American Icons: The Disney Parks

Thursday, June 16, 2016

Stories from inside the oddly touching, sometimes creepy, deeply American utopia that Walt Disney created.

Comments [1]

American Icons: 'Untitled Film Stills'

Thursday, May 05, 2016

Photographer Cindy Sherman’s pioneering series "Untitled Film Stills" transformed what self-portraits could be. 

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G.P.S. Directions for Getting Home Drunk

Friday, March 04, 2016

Siri navigates you home from the party after a few too many.

Missed Connections for A-Holes

Friday, February 26, 2016

These are missed connections you’ll be glad you missed.

Finding Music in the Political Circus

Friday, February 12, 2016

A songwriter and composer hits the campaign trail in search of musical theatre.

American Icons: "The Autobiography of Malcolm X"

Thursday, January 28, 2016

When Malcolm X was assassinated at 39, his book nearly died with him. Today it stands as a milestone in America’s struggle with race.

Comments [6]

American Icons: One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

Thursday, December 31, 2015

Ken Kesey had worked in a mental hospital, but his first novel was really a parable of what happens when you stand up to the Man — a counterculture fable that doesn’t end well.

Comments [9]

Let's Get Drinks

Friday, December 04, 2015

Why is it so hard to make a simple plan with a friend? Lena Dunham and Allison Williams, from the HBO series “Girls,” perform Kelly Stout’s “Let’s Get Drinks.”

Eve Sussman's Algorithmic Noir

Thursday, November 12, 2015

The movie “whiteonwhite” has human actors, director, and crew. But its editor is an algorithm that creates a different version of the film each time it plays. 

Comments [2]

The Computer As Artist

Thursday, November 12, 2015

Creative types tend to think computers will never take their jobs. They haven’t met Brutus.

Comments [1]

The Privileged Few

Friday, October 23, 2015

Allison Williams of HBO's Girls reads "The Privileged Few," by George Meyer.

American Icons: The Lincoln Memorial

Thursday, September 10, 2015

The Lincoln Memorial is now one of the most treasured landmarks of Washington, D.C. But for decades people fought over every aspect of it — and even whether it should be built at all.

Comments [8]

American Icons: Native Son

Thursday, July 30, 2015

The story of a young man in the ghetto who turns to murder was an overnight sensation. But some think "Native Son" exploited the worst stereotypes of black youth. 

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Terry Riley, a Founder of Minimalism, Turns 80

Thursday, June 18, 2015

Terry Riley helped kick off the genre known as minimalism with “In C,” a piece that was so unusual, no one quite knew what to make of it.

Comments [2]

Trenton Doyle Hancock’s Universe of Weirdness

Thursday, April 09, 2015

In Trenton Doyle Hancock’s irreverent art, he creates his own sci-fi world where vegans are the villains and color is a weapon. 

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Kelly Link, Queen of Realistic Fantasy

Thursday, February 26, 2015

In a typical Kelly Link short story, everything seems perfectly realistic — until the ghosts, wizards, and vampires show up.

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John Henry

Thursday, February 19, 2015

John Henry wins a race against the machine that threatens to take his job, but then he dies of exhaustion. Some victory.

Comments [1]

"Uncle Tom's Cabin"

Thursday, February 19, 2015

More than any other novel, “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” helped promote the abolitionist cause. So how did “Uncle Tom” become a name for someone who betrays his race?

Comments [21]