Streams

Bob Garfield

Host, On The Media

Bob Garfield appears in the following:

The Great Newspaper Strike of 1962-1963

Friday, August 09, 2013

Fifty years ago, 17,000 New York City newspaper workers went on strike, shuttering the city's seven daily papers for 114 days. Rooted in fears about new "cold type" printing technology, the strike ended up devastating the city's newspaper culture and launching the careers of a new generation of writers including Tom Wolfe, Gay Talese, and Nora Ephron. Vanity Fair contributor Scott Sherman talks with Bob about the strike and its legacy.

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The Forgotten Network

Friday, August 09, 2013

Television viewers under a certain age think of the big three broadcast networks as having existed since the dawn of time. A misconception, of course - but largely because of what it omits. In TV's earliest days, there was also the DuMont Network, a pioneering enterprise that aired some of its era's most popular programs. Bob talks history with David Weinstein, author of book that chronicles the rise and fall of DuMont.

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In the Empire Business

Friday, August 09, 2013

As the new owner of the Post, Jeff Bezos becomes one of the most important people in journalism. So who is Jeff Bezos? Bob talks with journalist Brad Stone about Bezos and how he might lead the paper. Stone is the author of The Everything Store: Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon -- it'll be released in October. 

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Like A Funeral

Friday, August 09, 2013

Bob speaks with Washington Post media reporter Paul Farhi about the scene at the Post when Post CEO and Chairman Don Graham announced the paper's sale to Amazon founder Jeff Bezos. Farhi had a unique perspective on the sale as the only reporter who knew the announcement was coming. Farhi also lays out the legacy of the Graham family. 

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On the Media’s Bob Garfield on Edward Snowden, WikiLeaks and the NSA

Friday, August 02, 2013

It was a big week of news on the national security front. While NSA contractor turned leaker Edward Snowden was securing asylum in Russia, the Guardian newspaper, which first published his revelations, uncovered more about the agency's controversial surveillance programs. 

 

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Detroit As Metaphor

Friday, August 02, 2013

Since Detroit filed for bankruptcy last month, it's been the subject of intense national coverage. Detroit's also been held up as a metaphor for everything that ails the country financially. Bob talks to historian Kevin Boyle, who has written extensively about the city, about how Detroit is and isn't a good synecdoche for the rest of industrial America.

Nils Frahm - For

  

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A Busy Week In the Security State

Friday, August 02, 2013

This week saw the conviction of Bradley Manning, congressional hearings on intelligence, and more stories broken from the leaks of Edward Snowden to The Guardian's Glenn Greenwald. Bob reflects on the public perception of government surveillance programs, the threats journalists face, and more.

Stateless - Miles to Go

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A Historic Case for Prosecuting Journalists Who Report Leaks

Friday, August 02, 2013

Back in 1942, the Department of Justice's Office of Legal Counsel wrote an opinion that determined a journalist could be in violation of the Espionage Act for reporting leaked information. Bob speaks to Gabriel Schoenfeld, author of Necessary Secrets: National Security, the Media and the Rule of Law about the Chicago Tribune reporter at the center of the case during WWII.

Jun Miyake - Lillies of the Valley

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What the Omnicom-Publicis Ad Merger Means for Madison Avenue

Monday, July 29, 2013

Two of the biggest names in advertising — Omnicom, based here in New York, and Publicis of Paris — are merging to form the world's largest ad firm.

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Opting in to View Porn in the UK

Friday, July 26, 2013

British Prime Minister David Cameron just announced a bold, two-pronged attack on both pornography that exploits children, and the availability of pornography to children. Bob talks to Mic Wright, tech reporter for the Daily Telegraph, about how Cameron's proposal will be both technically impossible and an invasion of privacy.

Johan Borger - Goodnight My Friend

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"Downloaded"

Friday, July 26, 2013

A new documentary called "Downloaded" explores the history and consequences of the file sharing service Napster. Bob talks to the film's director Alex Winter about how Napster sparked seismic changes we now take for granted in the music industry.

Beastie Boys - Multilateral Nuclear Disarmament 

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Steal My Book, Please

Friday, July 26, 2013

Russians have access to more than 100,000 pirated e-books and just 60,000 legitimate e-books. For some authors and publishers the theft is infuriating, but others take the view that it’s good to have your book out there in front of eyes no matter what the cost. In an interview from 2012, Bob speaks with Peter Mountford, author of A Young Man’s Guide to Late Capitalism,  who didn't just turn a blind eye to his book being pirated, but actually helped the process along. Mountford's new book - to be released in 2014 - is A Dismal Science

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Media Watch: Why The Obsession With the Royal Baby?

Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Kate Middleton, the Duchess of Cambridge, delivered a son. The baby boy is the third in line for the throne, and this is the first heir the royal family has had in this century—and in this era of Twitter and Facebook. What’s up with the media’s fascination with the royal heir? Bob Garfield has some insights. He’s the host of On The Media, which is produced by the Takeaway’s co-producer, WNYC.

 

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An Ethical Framework for Sponsored Content

Friday, July 19, 2013

Sponsored content, or "native advertising," is increasingly becoming a source of revenue for the financially strapped news media. But this can be dangerous territory since native advertising is often made to resemble the actual editorial content. Bob talks to Steve Rubel, chief content strategist at the PR firm Edelman, about an ethical framework for navigating the murky waters of sponsored content partnerships.

William Tyler - Country of Illusion

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A Dangerous "View"

Friday, July 19, 2013

This week, ABC announced that model, comedian, and anti-vaccine activist Jenny McCarthy would be joining the hit daytime talk show The View. Bob looks at the controversy surrounding her hiring and at the media's description of McCarthy's "controversial" views. 

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American Propaganda Allowed Stateside

Friday, July 19, 2013

The 1948 Smith-Mundt Act was intended to shield U.S. citizens from American propaganda, which the State Department has been broadcasting abroad for decades. This month, the Smith-Mundt Modernization Act takes effect, allowing that material to be broadcast stateside. Bob talks with Washington State Democrat and bill co-sponsor Adam Smith who says there is no need to worry.

Andrew Bird - Orpheo Looks Back

 

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How Threatening Was Domestic Propaganda?

Friday, July 19, 2013

The Smith-Mundt Modernization Act goes into effect this month, lifting prior domestic broadcast bans on U.S. propaganda. Bob talks to historian Thomas Fleming, author of The Illusion of Victory: America in World War One, about how powerful domestic propaganda was in the past, and how unlikely it is to have much impact today.

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Royal Baby Craze Reaches New Heights In U.K.

Friday, July 12, 2013

What's all the Royal baby fuss about in England? We talk to indifferent and cynical Brits about the hubbub and take a look at the goings-on surrounding the maternity.

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A Coup by any other name

Friday, July 12, 2013

A military coup is essentially a military action that transfers government power from one entity to another. This sounds a lot like what happened in Egypt with the military's removal of President Mohamed Morsi, but the new Egyptian leadership - and the Obama administration - are refusing to call it a coup. Bob talks to Harvard law professor Noah Feldman about using the C-word.

Shigeto - Ringleader

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A TMZ Approach to Local TV News

Friday, July 12, 2013

A new tv news show launched in New Jersey this week, called Chasing NJ. It’s supposed to revolutionize local news by modelling it after syndicated celebrity-gossip show TMZ. Chasing NJ has already sparked outcry from Jersey politicians who want the FCC to rescind the license of its broadcast station, WWOR. Bob talks to the Brian Stelter of the New York Times about the new show.

Bob Pinado - Africa

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