Streams

Beth Kobliner

Beth Kobliner appears in the following:

The More You Know, the Less You Owe

Wednesday, July 18, 2012

Americans owe more than $1 trillion in student debt, and without the proper financial knowledge this debt will only increase over time. In order to find a solution to this problem, we must start at the source: high school students.

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Guest Post: Raising Financially Smart Kids

Tuesday, July 17, 2012

Generations of parents have taught their kids these golden rules: Wear a seatbelt, don’t smoke, eat your vegetables. But we often forget vital financial lessons: Save money, avoid credit card debt, invest for the future. With high schoolers scoring an average of 69 percent (D+) on the Treasury Department’s 2012 National Financial Capability Challenge survey, it’s clear that families need help starting these critical conversations.

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Teaching Financial Literacy in Schools

Tuesday, July 17, 2012

The 2008 financial crisis and the great recession exposed Americans' flawed understanding of personal finance. Now the Obama Administration is making a push for financial literacy, starting with children as young as three years old.

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Money U: Finances During the College Years

Friday, September 02, 2011

Beth Kobliner, financial journalist, member of the President’s Advisory Council on Financial Capability, and author of Get a Financial Life: Personal Finance in Your Twenties and Thirties, discusses how to help your college student manage his or her personal finances upon going to school.

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How the Debt Ceiling Compromise Will Affect Unemployment

Tuesday, August 02, 2011

The new debt ceiling compromise comes with $2.1 trillion in cuts over the next decade. With the flailing economy and anemic job market, how will these cuts affect unemployment? When it comes to jobs, are there any sure-fire professions or regions of the country left? Beth Kobliner talks about what segments of the economy we can expect to expand in the new climate and what will suffer. In addition to being the author of "Get a Financial Life," Kobliner is also an appointee to the President’s Advisory Council on Financial Capability.  

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What to Do If We Default

Tuesday, July 26, 2011

Beth Kobliner, financial journalist, author of Get a Financial Life: Personal Finance in Your Twenties and Thirties, and member of the President’s Advisory Council on Financial Capability, gives advice on how to plan for the possibility of the U.S. defaulting on its debts.

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Bad Report Card? Blame the Economy

Tuesday, June 21, 2011

It’s report card season around America, the time of year when thousands of students and parents wait on pins and needles for what they hope will be good grades. But this year, some, if not many parents, may find themselves disappointed. And here’s why: student test scores tend to drop along with a community’s economy – regardless of whether their own parents have lost their jobs.

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Is Job Loss In Your Community Hurting Your Kid's Report Card?

Tuesday, June 21, 2011

School's almost out for the summer, which means it's report card time. But, parents, if your kids' grades are lower than usual, don't freak out and don't be disappointed—it could be a side effect of unemployment, even if you have a job.

Surprisingly, a new study from the National Bureau of Economic Research shows that in each state, when job loss goes up, test scores go down — for all students, not just for kids whose parents are unemployed.

So, parents, whether you’re employed or unemployed, facing money problems small or big, here’s my advice: Have the money talk with your kids.

 

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Getting a New Car? Pay Attention to Your Loan

Tuesday, June 07, 2011

Takeaway contributor, Beth Kobliner is concerned about subprime car loans. The loans allow buyers with low credit scores to find a way to pay for their cars, even if this means that they are taking on loans with high interest rates. As a car buyer, says Beth Kobliner, pay attention to your credit score; if you have good credit, be sure to find a loan that is right for you.

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Americans Becoming More Financially 'Fragile'

Thursday, May 26, 2011

The age-old, personal finance rule-of-thumb is that every American household should have about three months salary tucked away in savings in the case of a really rainy day. In the the best of times, Americans are pretty poor savers; so, how feasible is a three-month financial cushion in these troubled economic times? A new study published by the National Bureau of Economic Research decided to find out. Researchers asked Americans whether or not they would be able to raise $2,000 in cash within thirty days. The results of the poll may surprise you.

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New Evidence of America's Financial Fragility

Thursday, May 26, 2011

Unfortunately, Americans have always been terrible at saving: There have been lots of surveys and statistics that have proven this through the years. But a new survey provides shocking evidence that not only do many people not have any emergency savings on hand, they don’t even have a Plan B – no credit, no family to rely on, no belongings to pawn. They are the “financially fragile.”

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How to Get a Job After College

Thursday, May 12, 2011

The job market has been tough for college grads in the past few years. As we near yet another cycle of transitions, we’re taking a look at the current state of the job market, and checking in with recent graduates about what they’ve been facing. Takeaway contributor Beth Kobliner is here. Author of "Get a Financial Life,” she is also an appointee to the President’s Advisory Council on Financial Capability.

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Jobs for the Class of 2011?

Thursday, May 12, 2011

Unemployment is still at 9 percent, and the papers are filled with stories about out-of-work young people. What’s a brand-new college graduate to make of all this? Luckily, 2011 grads shouldn’t be too discouraged — there’s some good news these days, too.

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How to Teach Your Kids About Money

Thursday, April 21, 2011

A lot of parents grapple with how to talk to their kids about a certain sensitive topic. They want to know: Are the kids old enough to understand? Am I too late? And will I explain things right? We refer, of course, to money. Takeaway contributor Beth Kobliner has been working with the President's Advisory Council on Financial Capability on this very topic. She joins us from Washington DC, where she’s been on duty. Chuck Kalish is also here. A professor of educational psychology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, he researches and develops financial literacy curriculum for preschoolers.

 

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Talking With Your Kids About Money

Thursday, April 21, 2011

Many parents grapple with how to talk to their kids about a certain sensitive topic. They want to know: Are the kids old enough to understand? Am I talking about this too late, or too early? Will I explain things clearly, or just confuse them? I'm referring, of course, to the money talk. And I'm a firm believer in the idea that no kid is too young to get it.

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College Week: Listener Questions, Expert Answers

Friday, April 01, 2011

It’s the season of college acceptance and rejection letters, and all this week, we’ve been talking about college-related topics.

Today, we’re talking again with Beth Kobliner, Takeaway contributor and appointee to the President's Advisory Council on Financial Capability. Beth was here on Tuesday to walk us through the ABCs of college loans, financial aid, and debt.

Beth is back today to answer all the listener questions that have come in since her appearance on Tuesday.

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College Week: 'You're In, Now Pay Up'

Tuesday, March 29, 2011

High school seniors are glued to their mailboxes this week as they await college acceptance letters. However, after they get in, the question of how to pay for college looms. Personal finance expert and Takeaway contributor Beth Kobliner has some advice on how to get the right financial aid and to tell us about some affordable options for a college education.

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Paying for College

Tuesday, March 29, 2011

High school seniors across the country begin to receive their college acceptance letters this month, and many will be breathing a sigh of relief. Getting in is the hard part, right? But the process of paying for college is just as tough for many families – and it shouldn’t be an afterthought.

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How to Fight Mortgage Discrimination

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

A recent report examining Federal Reserve data found that African Americans and Hispanics were able to borrow 62 percent less to buy or refinance homes in 2009 than in 2004 (pre-crash). Mortgage dollars going to white borrowers also declined, but only by 17 percent. Other research, including a powerful study of foreclosure rates and segregation by two Princeton scholars, suggests that black and Hispanic potential homeowners face discrimination and difficulty at every stage of the home-buying process. In effect, after decades of being denied loans at all and being neglected by traditional financial institutions, suddenly minorities were sold the worst loans out there. “Obviously it’s impossible to prove an individual institution is prejudiced, but collectively they were,” said the study’s co-author Jacob Rugh. “Communities were left out to dry.”

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Home Loans to Minority Applicants Plunge

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

In the 1980s and 1990s banks avoided lending in minority neighborhoods and Blacks and Latinos were denied mortgages at disproportionately higher rates than equally credit-worthy whites. Redlining and mortgage discrimination was the norm. It seemed those days came to an end in the 2000s, when mortgage lenders began lending eagerly to anyone they could, and instead of being accused of avoiding minority borrowers, faced accusations of predatory lending in minority communities. However, now the tide has turned once again.

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