Streams

Barbara J King

Barbara J King appears in the following:

Should A Monkey Own A Copyright?

Wednesday, September 23, 2015

A six-year-old crested black macaque monkey named Naruto, who lives in the Tangkoko Nature Reserve on the island of Sulawesi, Indonesia, is at the center of a provocative lawsuit filed on Monday by the animal rights organization PETA.

Naruto's face is known the world over because, in 2011, he ...

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Carl Safina On Wild Wolves And Bottle-Fed Squirrels

Thursday, September 17, 2015

In the arena of ocean ecology and conservation, Carl Safina is a superstar. Through television documentaries, his writings and the Safina Center, he's been a vital force for years in educating the public about ocean pollution, overfishing and conservation.

When I found out that Safina ...

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A Love-Hate Relationship With Drones

Tuesday, September 08, 2015

In The New York Times travel section Sunday, Stephanie Rosenbloom described a hot day this summer when she sat in the Roman amphitheater in Arles, France.

As she imagined scenes Van Gogh may have observed there during the 19th century, she says, a soft whirring sound broke into her ...

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What Is The Psychic Toll Of Gun Violence?

Thursday, September 03, 2015

There's a lot of debate about how to define a mass shooting.

According to a recent NPR report, mass killings happen every two weeks in the U.S. — as defined by the FBI.

Some say the if the shooter dies, this person should be included in the number of ...

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Pop Quiz: How Science-Literate Are We, Really?

Thursday, August 27, 2015

An 11-question quiz that tests science literacy — some would say very basic science literacy — is on my mind this week.

The quiz, developed by Jon Miller, now director of the International Center for the Advancement of Scientific Literacy at the University of Michigan, has been around a ...

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Nature May Have A Profound Effect On Our Religiosity

Thursday, August 20, 2015

In U.S. counties with warm winters, temperate summers and beautiful natural resources — like beaches, lakes, hills or mountains — people's rates of affiliation with religious organizations are lower than in other places, according to a new study.

The study's authors, Todd W. Ferguson and Jeffrey A. ...

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Sharing Grief Across Species Lines

Thursday, August 13, 2015

A few months ago, a 10-year-old gray-and-white cat called Bootsie was taken, together with his mother and brother, to an animal shelter in Virginia. The caretakers of the cats said they were just too old to care for animals anymore.

Bootsie's mother and brother were sent away to another animal ...

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Are Whales And Dolphins Cultural Beings?

Thursday, August 06, 2015

The idea that our oceans teem with cultural animals — and have for millions of years — is the central conclusion of a new book by two whale scientists. And it's a convincing one.

Whales and dolphins, as they forage for food and interact with each other in their social ...

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Being A Woman: Who Gets To Decide?

Saturday, August 01, 2015

This week, Switzerland's Court of Arbitration for Sport ruled that the Indian sprinter Dutee Chand may race as a woman in international competition.

This decision is significant because, just last year, Chand was denied by track and field's governing body (the International Association of Athletics Federations or IAAF) the right ...

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Raising Voices For Cecil The Lion

Thursday, July 30, 2015

Cecil the lion's slaughter at the hands of trophy hunters in Zimbabwe has lit up the Internet and social media with protest and outrage in recent days.

Earlier this month, an American dentist from Minnesota named Walter Palmer paid hunting fees to organizers in Zimbabwe; either these local men, ...

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Putting Spiders On Treadmills In Virtual-Reality Worlds

Thursday, July 23, 2015

The methodology described in a recent study, a peer-reviewed paper on animal behavior — in which biologists Tina Peckmezian and Phillip W. Taylor of Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia, worked with 56 female jumping spiders — is fascinating.

Here's what the biologists did:

First, the spiders were ...

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Powered By Plants On The Ultramarathon Trail

Thursday, July 16, 2015

The Appalachian Trail (AT) runs from Springer Mountain in Georgia to Mount Katahdin in Maine, crossing 14 states for a total of 2,189 miles. This past Sunday, ultramarathon runner Scott Jurek completed a thru-hike of the AT in record-breaking time: 46 days, 8 hours and 7 minutes.

Given ...

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'Skyfaring': The Poetry And Science Of Air Travel

Thursday, July 09, 2015

In an episode of the Netflix program Sense8, the character Capheus suddenly finds himself an aircraft passenger alongside Riley, another "sensate" to whom he is mysteriously connected emotionally. Flying from London to Reykjavik, Riley is bored, her eyes dulled even as spectacular white clouds drift past her window. Capheus, ...

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Great White Sharks And The Thrill Of Unseen Nature

Thursday, July 02, 2015

Last Thursday, boat captain Giancarlo Thomae — flying in a helicopter over the Aptos, Calif., coastline — spotted and photographed what he called a "once in a lifetime event." There were 15 great white sharks swimming within a quarter-mile radius of the grounded SS Palo Alto ("the cement ...

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In 'Soul Of An Octopus,' An Invertebrate Steals Our Hearts

Thursday, June 25, 2015

Once a month, The New York Times Book Review includes animals as a category in its best-selling books list. This past Sunday, an invertebrate cracked the top group.

Coming in 10th — after books about birds, dogs, wolves, sheep and elephants — was Sy Montgomery's The Soul ...

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Justice Scalia And The Age Of Humanity

Friday, June 19, 2015

Earlier this month, Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia delivered a commencement address to the graduating class of the Stone Ridge School of the Sacred Heart in Bethesda, Md.

According to the Washington Post, Scalia drew laughter and applause as he spoke to the 79 graduates of the all girls' ...

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For Adults, Coloring Invites Creativity And Brings Comfort

Thursday, June 11, 2015

In 1982, anthropologist Adrienne Zihlman, now professor emerita at the University of California, Santa Cruz, published The Human Evolution Coloring Book. Students of biological anthropology were invited to learn about DNA, genes, monkeys and apes — and the fossils, tools and evolutionary relationships of our human ancestors ...

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Declaring The Discovery Of A New Species Can Get Tricky

Friday, June 05, 2015

May was an exciting month for new discoveries that add to our knowledge of human evolution during the period around 3 million years ago. This is before the origin of the genus Homo, 2.8 million years ago, and during the time when Australopithecus afarensis (the famous "Lucy") lived in East ...

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Viewing Octopus Choreography In Captivity

Thursday, May 28, 2015

The Cambridge Declaration on Consciousness, crafted in 2012 by a group of international scientists, states that octopuses — the only invertebrate animals mentioned — are conscious animals capable of intentional behavior. Books, articles and blog posts tout octopus intelligence.

Recently, I spent the morning behind the ...

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Is The War On Fat Harming Our Children?

Thursday, May 21, 2015

America's ongoing war on fat, which aims to save this country — and especially its young people — from a costly and damaging epidemic of obesity, turns out to be dangerous all on its own: It exacts a severe psychological and physical toll on the very individuals it purports to ...

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