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Arwa Gunja

Arwa Gunja appears in the following:

Mark O'Mara, Defense Lawyer for George Zimmerman, In the Spotlight

Monday, April 23, 2012

The media put a new face to the Trayvon Martin case last week: Mark O'Mara, the red-haired lawyer representing George Zimmerman, the man charged with murdering Martin in February. O'Mara has worked as both a defense attorney and prosecutor for nearly 30 years and is incredibly media savvy. But what is he really like and how will he handle the emotionally-charged atmosphere that this trial is sure to bring with it? Kendall Coffey explains how O'Mara will have to strategize both his defense and his media playbook if he wants to win the case. 

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Racism Is Crippling African-American Advances in Mathematics

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

In a column that quickly got him fired from his post at National Review, John Derbyshire offered some parental advice that he gives his own children when teaching them about the African-American community. This advice, he says, "may save their lives." One point he argues is that the "mean intelligence of blacks is much lower than for whites.” Much has been written about the falsity of his claims and the racist undertones of his overall argument. But derbyshire is correct in writing that there are "no black Fields Medal winners." Jonathan Farley is a professor of mathematics and recipient of the Harvard Foundation's Scientist of the Year medal in 2004. He explains why no African-Americans have yet to receive the prestigious Fields Medal.

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Executive's $15 Million Pay Package Denied by Citigroup Shareholders

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Citigroup shareholders have voted down the bank's $15 million pay package for its chief executive, Vikram Pandit. It's the first time that stock owners have united in opposition to outsized compensation at a major bank. Is this a new era of bank backlash? Eleanor Bloxham is the CEO of The Value Alliance, a board advisory firm, and Peter Morici is a macroeconomist and professor of international business at the University of Maryland. He is also the author of several books, including "Antitrust in the Global Trading System."

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"The Real CSI": New Documentary Looks at the Flaws in Forensic Science

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

Forensic science is central to almost every TV crime drama, but real life forensic science is a lot messier than the way it's portrayed on television. Andres Cediel is the producer of "The Real CSI," a new Frontline documentary produced by WGBH. The documentary tries to separate the science from the drama. Jennifer Mnookin, a UCLA law professor who specializes in the field of evidence, is featured in the documentary. She says forensic science techniques are often deeply flawed.

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Juvenile Justice Through the Lens of Photographer Richard Ross

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

It's hard to imagine life inside an 8x10 concrete cell, but for thousands of American minors, that's reality. They spend night after night locked inside a juvenile detention center. Photographer Richard Ross tries to bring that world to the mainstream public in a new series called "Juvenile-in-Justice." Ross has spent the last five years documenting 350 facilities in over 30 states. What's it like to be locked up in a juvenile detention center? Through stories and photographs, Richard Ross gives us a glimpse.

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Fighting Discrimination in the Criminal Justice System

Monday, April 16, 2012

In March, the Supreme Court heard one of the most widely anticipated cases of this term. In two related cases, Miller v. Alabama and Jackson v. Hobbs, human rights attorney Bryan Stevenson argued that sentencing minors to life in prison without parole is cruel and unusual punishment. Stevenson, the executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative has long dedicated his life to the injustices he sees in America's justice system, especially along racial and socioeconomic lines. Stevenson talks about his work and his commitment to challenging racial discrimination in the criminal justice system.

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France's Burqa Ban, One Year Later

Wednesday, April 11, 2012

One year ago, France implemented the "burqa ban," a restriction on Muslim women covering their faces in the burqa or niqab. Advocates for the ban argued it would free women of gender enslavement and help Muslims better integrate into French society. The ban received widespread support in France and even some Muslim organizations supported the legislation. Takeaway producer Arwa Gunja traveled to Paris as a reporting fellow with the International Center for Journalists to examine the impact of the law.

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Couch Surfing Goes Mainstream

Tuesday, April 10, 2012

It's long been said that when you travel, the best way to get to know a new place is to meet the people who live there. And, while it's not always possible, perhaps the best way to know the locals is to live among them, maybe spend a night or two on their couch. Patricia Marx wrote about couch surfing for The New Yorker. Valerie is a couch surfer from Chicago.

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Britain Deports Terror Suspects Wanted in the U.S.

Tuesday, April 10, 2012

The European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg, France, ruled today that Britain can legally deport five suspects wanted in the United States on charges of terrorism. The ruling came despite an argument from European attorneys that prison conditions in the U.S. are inhumane for terror suspects and convicts. John Burns is the London bureau chief for The New York Times.

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Can We Survive Without the Penny?

Monday, April 09, 2012

Canada's decision to stop producing its penny has launched a discussion in the U.S. In Canada, it costs 1.6 cents to produce a penny — so getting rid of the coin will save the country an estimated 11 million Canadian dollars a year. Meanwhile, in the United States it costs 2.4 cents to make a penny. Would frugal Abraham Lincoln approve? Richard Smith is the creative director at Sullivan, a New York brand engagement firm, and the president of the Dollar ReDe$ign Project.

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Briggs Initiative Founders Now Support the Repeal of the Death Penalty in California

Friday, April 06, 2012

More than 30 years ago, California voters passed a ballot initiative to broaden the reach of the state’s death penalty system. The law was intended to serve as a national model for how capital punishment should function in America. The expansion is called the Briggs Initiative, named after two of the architects of the law: Ron Briggs and his father, former State Senator John Briggs. The text of the law was written by attorney Don Heller. Decades later, Don Heller and Ron Briggs are again advocating for an initiative, but this time they want the state to repeal the death penalty.

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Toulouse Tragedy Aftermath: Muslim Communities Threatened, Political Rhetoric Altered

Friday, March 30, 2012

One week ago, Mohammed Merah, a 23-year-old Frenchman of Algerian descent, was shot dead by French security forces following a dramatic 32-hour police standoff. Questions remain about the attack itself: Did Merah act alone? And why didn’t French officials catch him before the rampage? Takeaway producer Arwa Gunja has been in France this week as a reporting fellow with the International Center for Journalists, and spoke with community members about their reaction to both the attacks and the tragedy’s fallout.

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NFL Hands Out Suspensions for New Orleans Saints' Bounty Fund

Thursday, March 22, 2012

The NFL yesterday handed out penalties for a scandal involving coaches tolerating and even setting bounties for tough hits on the field. New Orleans Saints coaches have been accused of paying players for hitting an opponent so hard as to knock them out of the game. Ibrahim Abdul Matin, Takeaway sports contributor, joins us to talk about the suspensions and the recent news of Tim Tebow's move to the New York Jets.

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French Attacks Spurred by Anti-Immigration Sentiment, Critics Warn

Thursday, March 22, 2012

Mohammed Merah, a French national of Algerian descent and former member of Al Qaeda, was allegedly behind two separate attacks in France this week. Benjamin Abtan, head of the European Grassroots Antiracist Movement, says there is concern that increasing anti-immigration sentiment may have fueled these attacks and that it could lead to others.

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Incarceration in America: Barriers to Re-entry

Thursday, March 22, 2012

All this week, we’re talking about incarceration in America. Today we're focusing on life after prison, and what happens to former inmates once they're released. Joining us is Michelle Alexander, author of "The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness" and law professor at Ohio State University, and Susan Burton, Founder and Executive Director of A New way of Life Re-Entry Project, a nonprofit dedicated to helping women break the cycle of incarceration.

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Does the Boeing 737 Airplane Have Dangerous Structural Problems?

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Every 2.5 seconds, somewhere in the world, a Boeing 737 takes off or lands. The Boeing 737 one of the world’s most popular planes, as well as one of the best-selling. But is it also plagued with dangerous structural problems? Last April, a Boeing 737 taking Southwest Airlines passengers from Phoenix to Sacramento had to make an emergency landing when part of the plane's body ripped, leaving a 59-inch hole in the roof of its cabin. It wasn't the first such incident to take place in a Boeing 737 — and a new investigation suggests it might not be the last.

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Israel Bans Use of Overly Thin Models

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Israel passed a law earlier this week that bans local advertisers from using overly thin models in their campaigns. It also requires publications to disclose when images are altered or photoshopped to make models appear thinner. The law's supporters hope it will promote healthier eating habits among models and stop glamorizing extreme thinness among the general population.

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Peyton Manning to Replace Tim Tebow on Broncos

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

It's a bittersweet morning for Denver Broncos fans. They got the news yesterday that Peyton Manning will become their next quarterback — and that means that beloved team leader Tim Tebow will soon be traded. Manning chose the Broncos over the Tennessee Titans and the San Francisco 49'ers.

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CEO of 2012 Olympics Discusses Six Years of Preparation

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

While our host John Hockenberry was in London last week, he met with Paul Deighton, Chief Executive Officer of the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. The two discussed the planning that has gone into the Games, one of the largest events a city can host. Deighton said the project was one of a kind.

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Finding Opportunities for Undocumented Students

Monday, March 12, 2012

Immigration reform has been a hot button topic in this campaign cycle — but for all the talk, there hasn’t been much real action. As the government stalls on immigration reform, many private citizens are taking actions into their own hands. It’s a 21st century “Underground Railroad” of sorts — a network of Americans who are quietly finding ways to assist their undocumented neighbors and friends, particularly the young people whose parents brought them here illegally as children. About 65,000 undocumented students graduate from U.S. high schools each year.

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