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Arwa Gunja

Arwa Gunja appears in the following:

JP Morgan Chase Announces $2 Billion Loss

Friday, May 11, 2012

In a major hit for Wall Street, JP Morgan Chase disclosed a $2 billion loss on Thursday related to its credit investment portfolio. The trickle down effect could mean a loss of another $800 million in the second quarter for the bank’s Chief Investment Office. The Takeaway talks with Michael de la Merced, reporter for The New York Times' Deal Book.

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Audio Essay: John Hockenberry Crashes Clooney's Fundraiser

Friday, May 11, 2012

The biggest campaign fundraiser in history raised $15 million and packed a star-filled house of Hollywood millionaires in LA with the President at the center of it all. A huge chunk of the money came from people who were entered in a drawing for a chance to see it all, to hang out with George Clooney, Barbra Streisand, Robert Downey Jr., producers like Jeffery Katzenberg, and director Stephen Speilberg.

Who would want to be a nobody at a party like that? We wanted to find out, so John Hockenberry crashes the Clooney dinner in this audio essay.

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Ph.D's on Food Stamps?

Friday, May 11, 2012

All this week we’ve been taking a hard look at the financial realities for students graduating from college. But how about the difficulties facing students in higher education? According to a new report, the number of Ph.D and masters students on public assistance has tripled in the past two years. The report's author and a 51-year-old Ph.D student on food stamps and Medicaid join the program.

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'Up': A Mother's Climbing Journey With Her Daughter

Friday, May 11, 2012

A mother embarks on a journey with her five-year-old daughter to scale all 48 of New Hampshire's 4,000-foot peaks, and discovers climbing is an invaluable teaching tool for instilling independence and self-determination. Patricia Ellis Herr chronicles these adventures with her daughter Alex Herr in her book, "Up: A Mother And Daughter's Peakbragging Adventure."

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Is the Gay Rights Movement Akin to the Civil Rights Movement?

Thursday, May 10, 2012

In a landmark moment for the gay rights movement in America, President Barack Obama announced, for the first time, his support of gay marriage. This comes years after Obama’s views on the issue have "evolved." In an interview with ABC News on Tuesday, Obama told Robin Roberts, "I’ve just concluded that for me personally it is important for me to go ahead and affirm that I think same-sex couples should be able to get married." Many gay rights leaders have long compared their fight to the black civil rights movement of the 1950s and '60s. But do the two compare?

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Finding the Brighter Side to America's Economic Decline

Thursday, May 10, 2012

Since the financial collapse in 2008, Americans have become accustomed to hearing grim news about the state of the economy. But author and economics editor Daniel Gross has a more optimistic take. In his new book, "Better, Stronger, Faster: The Myth of American Decline and the Rise of a New Economy," Gross argues that the country's initial reaction to the economic hardships have paved the way for a brighter, stronger future.

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Iraq's Sunnis and Shiites Set to a Shakespearean Love Story

Thursday, May 03, 2012

Take one of the greatest love stories of all time and replace the Montagues with Sunnis, the Capulets with Shiites, and set the play in Iraq. That’s the premise for the new play “Romeo and Juliet in Baghdad” showing this week at the World Shakespeare Festival in the United Kingdom. Listen to playwright and actor Monadhil Daood.

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Obama's Surprise Visit to Afghanistan

Wednesday, May 02, 2012

In a move that marks the beginning of the end of our war in Afghanistan, President Obama made a surprise visit to Kabul on Tuesday to sign a strategic partnership agreement with Afghan President Hamid Karzai. We talk with Michael Semple, fellow at the Carr Center for Human Rights at the Kennedy School of Government, about the political and foreign policy implications of the agreement.

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How Police Caught the Craigslist Killer

Monday, April 30, 2012

Philip Markoff, also known as the Craigslist Killer, evaded police for weeks. Eventually, he was tracked down via a trove of cyber information — IP addresses, emails, Facebook activity — that Markoff left behind when he logged onto his computer and began browsing the web. Freelance journalist James Robinson dissects the police's cyber-search in "Hunting the Craigslist Killer," his recent article for the Boston Phoenix.

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Fixing TSA's Broken Airport Security System

Tuesday, April 24, 2012

In a recent essay for The Wall Street Journal, former Transportation Security Administration administrator Kip Hawley said the current airport security system in broken, and he offers suggestions to fix it. He argues that beyond making airline travel unpleasant for customers, TSA officials are focusing their efforts on the wrong kind of threats.

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Rep. Dingell, Longest-Serving House Member, Faces Challenge from Ph.D. Student

Monday, April 23, 2012

U.S. Rep. John Dingell (D-Mich.) has served in Congress since Dwight Eisenhower was president. He is the longest-serving member of Congress and, this year, he is running for his 30th term. But he is facing his first challenge from another Democrat since 2002. We talk with Daniel Marcin, a Ph.D. student at the University of Michigan, who is working to get on the ballot for the August 7th primary.

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Hulu Shakes Up TV Advertising

Monday, April 23, 2012

Every year cable channels and network broadcasters hold "upfronts," where they pitch advertisers on their new shows. Hulu, the online service that streams network TV programming, is pitching its own original programming this year, competing with the very stations it relies on. Brian Stelter, media reporter for our partner The New York Times, joins us to discuss how TV will fare in the age of the Internet.

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Michael Kirk on "Money, Power and Wall Street"

Monday, April 23, 2012

Three years after America's largest financial collapse since the Great Depression, the country is still recovering. Some banks have received huge bailouts, but countless Americans are still struggling to get back on their feet. A new four-hour documentary, "Money, Power and Wall Street" investigates what has been done (and not done) to secure America's financial future. Michael Kirk is one of the producers of "Money, Power and Wall Street," which will premiere on Frontline April 24 and May 1 on your local PBS station.

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Mark O'Mara, Defense Lawyer for George Zimmerman, In the Spotlight

Monday, April 23, 2012

The media put a new face to the Trayvon Martin case last week: Mark O'Mara, the red-haired lawyer representing George Zimmerman, the man charged with murdering Martin in February. O'Mara has worked as both a defense attorney and prosecutor for nearly 30 years and is incredibly media savvy. But what is he really like and how will he handle the emotionally-charged atmosphere that this trial is sure to bring with it? Kendall Coffey explains how O'Mara will have to strategize both his defense and his media playbook if he wants to win the case. 

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Racism Is Crippling African-American Advances in Mathematics

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

In a column that quickly got him fired from his post at National Review, John Derbyshire offered some parental advice that he gives his own children when teaching them about the African-American community. This advice, he says, "may save their lives." One point he argues is that the "mean intelligence of blacks is much lower than for whites.” Much has been written about the falsity of his claims and the racist undertones of his overall argument. But derbyshire is correct in writing that there are "no black Fields Medal winners." Jonathan Farley is a professor of mathematics and recipient of the Harvard Foundation's Scientist of the Year medal in 2004. He explains why no African-Americans have yet to receive the prestigious Fields Medal.

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Executive's $15 Million Pay Package Denied by Citigroup Shareholders

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Citigroup shareholders have voted down the bank's $15 million pay package for its chief executive, Vikram Pandit. It's the first time that stock owners have united in opposition to outsized compensation at a major bank. Is this a new era of bank backlash? Eleanor Bloxham is the CEO of The Value Alliance, a board advisory firm, and Peter Morici is a macroeconomist and professor of international business at the University of Maryland. He is also the author of several books, including "Antitrust in the Global Trading System."

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"The Real CSI": New Documentary Looks at the Flaws in Forensic Science

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

Forensic science is central to almost every TV crime drama, but real life forensic science is a lot messier than the way it's portrayed on television. Andres Cediel is the producer of "The Real CSI," a new Frontline documentary produced by WGBH. The documentary tries to separate the science from the drama. Jennifer Mnookin, a UCLA law professor who specializes in the field of evidence, is featured in the documentary. She says forensic science techniques are often deeply flawed.

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Juvenile Justice Through the Lens of Photographer Richard Ross

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

It's hard to imagine life inside an 8x10 concrete cell, but for thousands of American minors, that's reality. They spend night after night locked inside a juvenile detention center. Photographer Richard Ross tries to bring that world to the mainstream public in a new series called "Juvenile-in-Justice." Ross has spent the last five years documenting 350 facilities in over 30 states. What's it like to be locked up in a juvenile detention center? Through stories and photographs, Richard Ross gives us a glimpse.

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Fighting Discrimination in the Criminal Justice System

Monday, April 16, 2012

In March, the Supreme Court heard one of the most widely anticipated cases of this term. In two related cases, Miller v. Alabama and Jackson v. Hobbs, human rights attorney Bryan Stevenson argued that sentencing minors to life in prison without parole is cruel and unusual punishment. Stevenson, the executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative has long dedicated his life to the injustices he sees in America's justice system, especially along racial and socioeconomic lines. Stevenson talks about his work and his commitment to challenging racial discrimination in the criminal justice system.

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France's Burqa Ban, One Year Later

Wednesday, April 11, 2012

One year ago, France implemented the "burqa ban," a restriction on Muslim women covering their faces in the burqa or niqab. Advocates for the ban argued it would free women of gender enslavement and help Muslims better integrate into French society. The ban received widespread support in France and even some Muslim organizations supported the legislation. Takeaway producer Arwa Gunja traveled to Paris as a reporting fellow with the International Center for Journalists to examine the impact of the law.

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