Streams

Arwa Gunja

Arwa Gunja appears in the following:

After Arrest of Imams, Florida's Muslim Community Shaken

Tuesday, May 17, 2011

In the first major case of homegrown terrorism in this post-Osama bin Laden era, six people were indicted by the FBI for funneling around $50,000 to terrorists in Pakistan. Two of those arrested were imams from south Florida. Nearly ten years out from the terrorist attack on Sept. 11, we evaluate how the relationship between federal law enforcement officials and Muslim communities has evolved in order to more effectively work together to prevent homegrown terrorism. Asad Ba-Yunus, a former Miami-Dade assistant state attorney who now serves as legal adviser for the Coalition of South Florida Muslim Organizations.

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Closing the Mississippi River: Safe but Costly

Tuesday, May 17, 2011

The Coast Guard and Army Corps of Engineers continue working around the clock to prevent massive flooding to major cities in the South. But even as they open floodgates and break through levees, the Mississippi River continues to rise. If it rises above 18.5 feet — two feet higher than it was on Saturday — access to parts of the river could be limited or temporarily shut down.

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Two Florida Imams Arrested on Charges of Supporting Taliban

Monday, May 16, 2011

Monday afternoon, two Florida imams are scheduled to be arraigned in a federal court in Miami after being arrested for allegedly providing financial support for the Pakistani Taliban. Imam Hafiz Muhammed Sher Ali Khan runs the city's oldest mosque, the Flagler Mosque. He, in addition to his two sons, and three others in Pakistan, were indicted for supporting terrorist organizations in Pakistan. Jay Weaver, federal courts reporter for The Miami Herald, talks about the case and the role of the Khan family in Miami.

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Libyan Opposition Minister: Limited Funds Could Hinder Movement

Monday, May 16, 2011

Libya's main opposition group, the Libyan Transitional National Council, made significant gains in the last week against pro-Gadhafi forces when they retook the Western port city of Misrata. However, the group faced a political setback on Friday after meeting with members of President Obama's administration in Washington, D.C., and failing to be fully recognized by the United States as Libya's official and legitimate ruling council. The president of the Libyan Transitional National Council, Mahmoud Jibril, said financial constraints could threaten their progress as well.

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In Decade Since 9/11, FBI Head Leaves Mark on Bureau

Friday, May 13, 2011

President Barack Obama is asking Congress to extend the term of Federal Bureau of Investigations Director Robert S. Mueller III for two years. Mueller was sworn in as the head of the F.B.I. just seven days before the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2011 — an event that marked the greatest challenge ever for the nation and the bureau's 93-year history. Mueller has led the FBI in preventing attacks like the Christmas Day shoe-bomber and stopping al-Qaida operative Najibullah Zazi who was headed for New York City in 2009 to blow himself up. For more on how Mueller changed the FBI and who might be qualified to replace him, we talk with Barton Gellman, contributing editor at large for Time Magazine, a research fellow at NYU's Center on Law and Security, and author of Angler: The Cheney Vice Presidency.” He wrote an article on Mueller and the future of the FBI for this week's Time Magazine.

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Without New Leader, Future of Al-Qaida in Limbo

Friday, May 13, 2011

With the death of Osama bin Laden, al-Qaida is now calling on all its followers to prepare do-it-yourself plans of attack against America. And it’s a sharp contrast to the strategy taken on by bin Laden, which focused on long-term planning for one big attack on U.S. soil. This message from the terror network’s online presence is just among the first signs that a change in leadership will also mean a change in strategy. And it seems that without a prominent candidate, the future of the organization is in limbo. We talk with Scott Shane, national security reporter for The New York Times who broke this story for the paper.

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Libya's Humanitarian and Military Crisis: Who Leads?

Thursday, May 12, 2011

Following the NATO-led bombardment of targeted government buildings in the Libyan capital of Tripoli earlier this week, the United Nations called on both sides to pause their military assaults in order to ease the growing humanitarian crisis. Misrata, which has been under attack for weeks by pro-Gadhafi forces, is short of food, water and other basic supplies. An estimated 750,000 people have fled the country since the uprising began in February. NATO entered Libya to prevent a humanitarian crisis. But without Gadhafi’s forces letting up anytime soon, the fighting seems to only be escalating the humanitarian situation. So how do the United Nations and NATO collaborate on a joint humanitarian and military operation?

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Raj Rajaratnam, Hedge Fund Billionaire, Guilty of Insider Trading

Thursday, May 12, 2011

In what has amounted to one of the largest and most prominent cases of insider trading, a billionaire hedge fund manager was found guilty Wednesday of fraud and conspiracy by a federal jury in Manhattan. Raj Rajaratnam is the co-founder of the hedge fund Galleon Group — he was also considered one of the savviest traders on Wall Street. But for nine months, the federal government secretly recorded Rajaratnam’s phone conversations with traders and powerful corporate insiders. We get the back story with Louise Story, Wall Street and finance reporter for The New York Times.

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Pakistan Warning: Another Covert Op Could Worsen Relations

Friday, May 06, 2011

Questions about the covert U.S. mission in Abbottabad, Pakistan are leading to new found frustrations in the already rocky relationship between the two countries. Some American lawmakers are skeptical that the Pakistani intelligence was unaware that Osama bin Laden was hiding just an hour’s drive from the capital city of Islamabad. Meanwhile, Pakistani officials say they will not tolerate a future incident where the U.S. military engages in a covert operation in Pakistan without the government’s knowledge. What's next in the diplomatic game?

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Commodity Prices Tank

Friday, May 06, 2011

Commodity prices tanked on Thursday, as oil fell 8.6 percent and silver dropped 8 percent. This comes after disappointing economic reports showing that consumers are spending less due to rising food and energy prices, and business are hiring at a slower pace. We talk with The New York Times Wall Street and finance reporter Louise Story about the volatility of the commodities market.

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Proof is in the Hard Drives: Bin Laden's Terror Tech

Friday, May 06, 2011

After poring over documents and hard drives taken out of the compound in Abbottabad where bin Laden was killed, intelligence analysts have surmised that the al-Qaida leader was consistently in touch with the terrorist network he helped create, and still intimately involved in plotting more attacks. A story in The New York Times details the data found and C.I.A. surveillance conducted before the mission to take out bin Laden was completed. We're joined by Scott Shane, a New York Times reporter who worked on the story. 

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Lawmakers Begin New Round on Negotiations on Debt

Thursday, May 05, 2011

The president travels to Ground Zero in lower Manhattan today; but back in Washington the debate over the budget and debt ceilign continues. A bipartisan group of lawmakers will meet for the first time with Vice President Joe Biden to try to find an agreement on raising the debt limit. And as can be expected, there's a lot of jockeying and lowering of expectations. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich shares the latest.

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Codename Geronimo: Offensive to Native Americans?

Thursday, May 05, 2011

"Geronimo" — that was the codename given to America’s most hated man, the world’s most hunted terrorist, and the object of one of our most high profile military missions ever. But now, many are taking issue with the United States government associating Osama bin Laden with an iconic Native American leader. And the Fort Still Apache Tribe in Oklahoma is asking President Obama for an apology. We talk with Jeff Houser, Tribal Chairman of the Fort Sill Apache Tribe.

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Former Navy SEAL Team Six Sniper on Bin Laden Mission

Wednesday, May 04, 2011

In his new memoir, former Navy SEAL sniper Howard Wasdin writes, “When the U.S. Navy sends their elite, they send the SEALs. When the SEALs send their elite, they send SEAL Team Six.” And that was certainly the case on Sunday, when a team of highly trained men overtook a a secure compound in Pakistan to eliminate the world’s most wanted terrorist figure. They accomplished this mission, in the midst of crossfire, in under 40 minutes. We talk with Howard Wasdin, a former member of this clandestine unit, about what Team Six must have gone through to get face-to-face with Osama bin Laden.

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How Will Bin Laden's Death Affect Mid East Uprisings?

Tuesday, May 03, 2011

Since the start of the political uprisings in the Middle East, regimes have fallen in Egypt and Tunisia. Meanwhile, Yemen, Syria, Bahrain and Libya continue their struggles to unseat dictators and bring about democratic change. And throughout it all, the voice of al-Qaida — and more importantly, its leader, Osama bin Laden — has been relatively silent. The question now remains, will the death of bin Laden at the hands of American forces continue to spur democratic movements or could it fuel terrorist organizations to stand in the way of change in the Middle East?

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The Future of Al Qaeda Without Bin Laden

Monday, May 02, 2011

Osama bin Laden has long been the most hunted man in the world. As the leader of Al Qaeda and the mastermind of the worst terrorist attack on American soil, he's served as the main target for the US war on terror. With his death, how will the terrorist organization change? We talk with Gideon Rose, author of How Wars End and editor of Foreign Affairs

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Bin Laden Death a Significant US Milestone

Monday, May 02, 2011

The day after Sept. 11, 2001, journalists from around the world flocked to the Middle East to cover what would be become the defining story of the decade. Osama bin Laden instantly became a household name and Al Qaeda was America's new enemy. Now, nearly ten years later, the U.S. has achieved its original mission in Afghanistan — to find and kill bin Laden. To mark this historic moment, we talk with two veteran reporters who've been covering the story from day one: David Sanger and Rod Nordland, reporters with our partner The New York Times.

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Veterans and 9/11 Families React to Bin Laden's Death

Monday, May 02, 2011

Veterans and families of victims of the 9/11 attacks are gathering at Ground Zero and elsewhere this morning, to celebrate and reflect on the news that Osama Bin Laden is dead. We speak with Dennis McKeon, a parishioner of St. Clare's Roman Catholic Church in Staten Island, which lost 29 members of its congregation in the 9/11 attacks. McKeon started the organization Where to Turn, which helps those affected by the attack. We also talk with Russell Galeti, first lieutenant in the Ohio National Guard.

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Bin Laden Death: Terrorism Killer or Creator?

Monday, May 02, 2011

How will the world react to the death of Bin Laden? Or perhaps more significantly, how will the world of terrorism react? We speak with Lydia Khalil, former counterterrorism analyst with the NYPD, as well as Christine Fair, assistant professor at the Center for Peace and Security, to learn more. 

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The Nuts and Bolts of Bin Laden's Death

Monday, May 02, 2011

How did U.S. forces coordinate Osama Bin Laden's death? Takeaway Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich explains the nuts and bolts of how this happened, and reports on the reactions in Washington, D.C.

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