Streams

Arthur Yorinks

Arthur Yorinks has written and directed for opera, theater, dance, film, and radio and is the author of over thirty five acclaimed and award-winning books and essays. His numerous accolades for his work for children include the prestigious Caldecott award.

After veering off his path of becoming a classical pianist in his teens (studying under Juilliard professor Robert Bedford), Mr. Yorinks has spent nearly four decades working in the performing arts, writing and directing numerous plays including So, Sue Me, which premiered at The Kennedy Center, and most recently the multimedia audio work, The Invisible Man which premiered at The Jerome L. Greene Performance Space in New York.  In opera, Mr. Yorinks was Philip Glass’s librettist for his operas The Juniper Tree and The Fall of the House of Usher, which have been performed worldwide. Mr. Yorinks’s work in dance includes collaborations with companies such as The Hartford Ballet and Pilobolus (where he helped create the full-length dance/theater piece, A Selection). In his varied and wide-ranging career, Yorinks’s work brought him into collaborations with celebrated artists including Andre Serban, Bill Irwin, Richard Foreman, Maurice Sendak, Robert Redford and legendary filmmaker Michael Powell, among many others.

Compelled by the use of sound in the theater Mr. Yorinks has, for twenty years, experimented with the relationship between audio and live performance. Ten years ago he formalized that passion into a company devoted to exploring, evolving, and redefining audio theater. Since then, Mr. Yorinks has written and directed over forty original audio plays performed in seasons at The Kennedy Center, The Henry Street Playhouse (Abrons Arts Center), The Jacob Burns Film Center, The New Victory Theater as well as New York Public Radio’s Jerome L. Greene Performance Space in New York, where he is consulting advisor for A New Theater of Sound

Arthur Yorinks appears in the following:

Dubliners: A Quartet

Thursday, June 26, 2014

An audio play inspired by James Joyce’s stories, performed in WNYC's Jerome L. Greene Space to mark the 100th anniversary of Dubliners.

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Dubliners: A Quartet - A Work in Progress

Wednesday, June 11, 2014

Get a behind-the-scenes look at Dubliners: A Quartet, a newly commissioned audio play written by award-winning playwright Arthur Yorinks on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of James Joyce's short story collection, Dubliners.

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August Wilson Cycle

Friday, September 20, 2013

WNYC's The Greene Space is in the midst of presenting all ten plays that form August Wilson's American Century Cycle. Artistic director Ruben Santiago Hudson, actor and associate artistic director Stephen McKinley Henderson, and the project’s audio theater producer Arthur Yorinks talk about the playwright and his work, its depiction of African American history, and the process of converting stage productions to radio drama.

→Check ticket availability for the remaining performances at The Greene Space.

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The Greene Space

Blind Fear: An Evening of New Audio Plays

Friday, June 14, 2013

7:00 PM

In collaboration with The Flea Theater, The Greene Space presents an evening of short, thrilling and original audio plays by some of NYC's up-and-coming playwrights. 

The Greene Space

Inside Look: The Assembled Parties

Thursday, May 2, 2013

5:00 PM

Join us for a "theater happy hour" and behind-the-scenes look at this world-premiere production. Featuring cast members Judith Light, Jessica Hecht and Jeremy Shamos. Watch on-demand video now.

The Greene Space

Their Eyes Were Watching God: Tea Cake’s Legacy

Monday, September 17, 2012

7:00 PM

Award-winning poet and actor Carl Hancock Rux revisits Zora Neale Hurston’s celebrated novel "Their Eyes Were Watching God" from the point of view of Janie’s love interest, Tea Cake, with an original performance art piece commissioned by The Greene Space. This work will explore Hurston’s narrative through a male lens. Following the ...

A MEANINGFUL MONTH

Tuesday, October 25, 2011

It’s been a notable month for radio drama, we note it here – the death of Norman Corwin, one of the genre’s champions, inventors, missionaries, and poet-kings. There was a time when radio was the center of America’s cultural universe, and Norman Corwin was one of an inspired few who had grabbed hold of the medium and used it for artistic expression of the highest order.

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The Conversation Begins

Monday, April 18, 2011

As we begin our conversation it seems most appropriate to introduce my colleagues, Sarah Montague and Andy Lanset.

Sarah gives us her look on the history of radio drama while Andy laments the woeful lack of tangible pieces of that history; both speak with eloquence and verve.

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