Streams

Anna Sale

Anna Sale appears in the following:

First Take: Yemen Terrorist Threat, Chilean Miners, Design Cars for Safer Texting?

Wednesday, August 25, 2010

Anna Sale here on the day shift.

We're following up today on reports of a major paradigm shift in U.S. counterterrorism strategy. The Washington Post reported this morning that the CIA no longer believes that the most urgent terror threat comes from the Pakistan-based al-Qaida cell connected to Osama bin Laden. Now, analysts are focused more on the activity of an al-Qaida offshoot in Yemen. For tomorrow's show, we're reaching out to counterterrorism thinkers and experts on Yemen to learn more about what exactly that means, and what changes it could bring for counterterrorism tactics and resource distribution.

We also continue to be glued to the story of the trapped miners in Chile. As we learn more details — about their messages to people above, their meager rations, their first contact with their families — we only have more questions. We'll have the latest from the mine site tomorrow, and take a closer look at the culture and geography of this Chilean mining region.  

Finally, Joel Johnson, editor at large of Gizmodo.com asked in a recent column, “Why Isn't There A Better Way to Text While Driving?” So far, he’s received over 500 responses to his column, most of which suggest that people who text and drive simply give it up, use the phone instead, or die behind the wheel because they deserve to. But Joel Johnson insists that, in a world where most people text and drive, his question is valid. What do you think? Should texting while driving be outlawed or be made safer?

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First Take: Primary Results, Deploying for Afghanistan Surge, Questions of Life and Death in Organ Donation

Tuesday, August 24, 2010

Anna Sale here on the day shift.

There are elections today in five states (Fla, Ariz, Ark., Vt, and Okla.), so we are getting ready for an exciting night of returns. We're reaching out to reporters and political thinkers to help us unpack the results and decipher any national threads to pull out — incumbent backlash, the fortunes of Tea Party-backed candidates, for example — but we also want to hear from voters about their motivations at the polls. If you're voting today, let us know what's on your mind as you make your choice.

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First Take: Biloxi Rebuilds After Katrina, Young Muslims on Mosque Debate, Traditions Worth Saving

Monday, August 23, 2010

Anna Sale here on the dayshift.

This week marks five years since Hurricane Katrina hit the gulf coast, and all this week we'll be looking at how communities and culture have changed in its aftermath. We talked this morning about how the shortcomings of the federal government response still loom large in political debates. Tomorrow, we'll hear voices from Biloxi, Miss. about quietly rebuilding and reorienting, with the media spotlight turned  the other way.

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First Take: Legacy of Operation Iraqi Freedom, Getting Aid to Pakistan, NYers on Mosque

Thursday, August 19, 2010

Anna Sale here on the day shift.

We spent this morning unpacking the meaning of the last combat brigade departure from Iraq. We talked to former weapons inspector Hans Blix, reporters on the ground and in Washington, a resident of Baghdad, and military wives on how their families are processing the news. We analyzed the media's handling of the milestone, and we also heard from you. We'll continue our look at the legacy of Operation Enduring Freedom tomorrow, and we could use your help. Do you think we won the Iraq war? Let us know what you think at 877-8-MY-TAKE or in the comments here.

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First Take: Slow Aid to Pakistan, Young and Unemployed, World Without Islam

Monday, August 16, 2010

Anna Sale here on the day shift.

We are continuing to follow the impact of the monsoon floods in Pakistan. We talked this morning to the host of the BBC's radio service called "Lifeline," which is trying to reach Pakistanis, offering a call-in for people who need important aid information, and also giving them a forum for telling their own story during the disaster. Tomorrow we will look at the scale of the international aid response, and it has its critics. British Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg called the effort so far "absolutely pitiful." We'll talk about how much has been pledged so far, the pace of the response and what's needed to address what United Nations Secretary General Bahn Ki Moon calls the worst disaster he's ever witnessed.

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First Take: Charges against Rangel, Spill in Michigan and Gulf Claims in Boise, Clarifying Claims Process, Duvall and Spacek on 'Get Low'

Thursday, July 29, 2010

Anna Sale, here, on the day shift.

The House Ethics Committee has just released the list of thirteen alleged violations charges against Rep. Charles Rangel (D-N.Y.) (PDF, 1MB). Todd Zwillich has been reportings on the hearing all day, and tomorrow, he will have reactions and the latest on the political fallout in Washington and New York. For a little context, check out our conversation this morning, about the history of the famous (and infamous) political leaders who have come from Harlem.

We are also watching a few oil-spill-related stories today, and and only part of our attention is on the Gulf Coast. We’re monitoring proceedings in Boise, where a panel of federal judges are considering where and how the liability claims against BP will be processed. Among their decisions: whether the  judges presiding over liability claims will be based near the spill in New Orleans or near BP headquarters in Houston. It’s part symbolism and part legal strategy, and we’re reaching out to lawyers and Gulf coast residents to hear what they’re making of it all. We’re also reaching out to reporters at Takeaway station WDET in Detroit to get the latest on the oil spill that’s making its way to Lake Michigan.

Finally, we were honored to have Robert Duvall and Sissy Spacek in studio recently to talk about their new film, 'Get Low.' It was a great conversation and such an honor to hear two giants of their craft talk about making this movie together. It’s about an elderly hermit planning his funeral – which he wants to attend – and if that premise doesn’t get you in the theater, their chemistry and affection for one another certainly will.

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First Take: Judge Blocks Parts of Arizona Immigration Law, Questioning Obama's Education Policy, Better Movies than Books

Wednesday, July 28, 2010

Anna Sale here on the day shift. 

This just in: a federal judge in Arizona has blocked some of the most controversial parts of the state's immigration law. They were scheduled to go into effect tomorrow. U.S. District Judge Susan Bolton's injuction includes the part of the law that required police to check immigration status while enforcing other laws. Prior to this decision, the enforcement of the new law may still have varied across the state, depending on the different interpretations and capabilties of local police agencies. Tomorrow, we'll review the decision and look at what happens next in court and in Arizona communities.

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In Colorado Midterms, Nobody Wants to Be the Insider

Monday, July 26, 2010

It may seem like a distant memory, but back in 2008, the story of the Democratic presidential primary was the rise of a relative newcomer to Washington taking on the party establishment with grassroots organizing. It was a winning strategy for then-candidate Barack Obama in Colorado, where he earned more than two-thirds of the primary votes and defeated Hillary Clinton. 

In Colorado’s Democratic Senate primary this year, there’s another candidate campaigning as an outsider, but the establishment narrative is flipped. This time, the political newcomer is the incumbent, and the challenger is a mainstay of Colorado politics.

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First Take: Lessons from Iraq; Tipping Point for Big 3?; Filmmaker Todd Solondz on Discomfort and Storytelling

Thursday, July 22, 2010

Anna Sale here on the day shift.

The war debate in Washington has recently centered on the Obama administration's strategy in Afghanistan, while the troop drawdown in Iraq is proceeding in the background. We talked last week about the last transfer of an American-run prison back to Iraqi control, but there's so much more to reflect on as the war decrescendos. We'll be having a series of conversations over the next several months about the lessons learned in Iraq. What do you think we've learned in the past seven years?

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First Take: Listeners on Lost Jobs and Shirley Sherrod; How the Fed Grades the Economy (and What It Means for You); Comic-Con!

Wednesday, July 21, 2010

Updated 6:57pm EST

Arwa Gunja here on the night shift.

We’re watching two breaking stories in different American cities. In Detroit, Police Chief Warren Evans unexpectedly stepped down earlier today. And in Chicago, the defense rested in the trial of ex-Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich, even without having him testify. We’ll get updates on both stories.

And a third city is making headlines today. In a 5-2 vote, Oakland City Council approved an ordinance to allow industrial marijuana production. This comes just weeks before a vote in California on whether to legalize recreation use of marijuana. Currently, fourteen states plus the District of Columbia have legalized medical marijuana. The decision in Oakland now opens up a new avenue for the crop to enter the commercial sector. Tomorrow, we’ll talk with Ryan Nerz, author of the book, “MarijuanAmerica,” about whether our society is growing more tolerant of pot and its legalization.

Also tomorrow, Slate writer Emily Bazelon returns to the show to talk about her article, “What Really Happened to Phoebe Prince.” The story of Phoebe Prince made international headlines when the 15-year-old girl took her own life in January, after she was alledgebly the repeated victim of bullies in school. Tomorrow, six of accused bullies are facing felony charges, including charges for statutory rape charges for two of the accused. But Bazelon, who has bee investigating the case since February, says the story is much more complicated than it appears. She’ll share her findings tomorrow on the show.

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First Take: Foreclosure and the Feds, Immigration and Higher Ed, Dream Scientist on "Inception"

Thursday, July 15, 2010

Anna Sale here, on the day shift.

We've been hearing from lots of you this morning. After a federal court struck down an FCC policy on indecency this week, we decided to have a little fun and asked: If you were all-powerful, what word you would ban? We got lots of responses.

We're looking for your help again as we put together a few conversations about continued foreclosures and their implications for neighorhoods and taxpayers. In its latest estimates, RealtyTrac predicts that there could be more than one million foreclosures this year. We're reaching out to housing economists to explain what the persistent drumbeat of foreclosures means for the federal government, given its big stakes in Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae. We're also asking you for updates on what you're seeing on your block. Send us signs of emptiness or recovery on your block. Text 69866 with the word TAKE, followed by what you see down the street.

We talked this morning about the impact of the 1986 amnesty for illegal immigrants. Tomorrow, we'll look at another angle on the immigration debate: What happens to students who are illegal immigrants, after high school graduation? Immigration advocacy groups have organized a series of classes in Washington to bring attention to the hurdles to college enrollment that come with undocumented status. They're calling the classes Dream U, which echoes the Dream Act, a bill pending in Congress that would give legal status to some immigrants who serve in the military or attend college.

Finally, we talk movies every Friday, and I'm excited for this one. We're talking about Inception, the new thriller starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Ellen Page. In the movie, the characters infiltrate other people's dreams for their own gain. Of course, it's being billed as science fiction. But it leads many to wonder: is there any way for us to really see what other people are dreaming? Is it possible for us to influence their dreams? What should we do if we're being chased in our dreams? And why do we dream in the first place? Rafer Guzman is joined by dream scientist Bob Hoss in this conversation about movies, dreams, and science.

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First Take: Radicalism in East Africa, AIDS and Black Churches, Goodbye to Harvey Pekar

Monday, July 12, 2010

UPDATED 9:00 p.m EST

Alex Goldmark here on the night shift with a quick update. Tomorrow morning the Obama administration will be announcing their strategy for combating HIV/AIDS. We will be getting the details straight from the source, Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius.  

That's pretty much the only update right now. 

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The Looming Debt Crisis for States

Monday, July 12, 2010

Long-term debt obligations. Bond interest rates. Pension liabilities. These words may make your eyes glaze over, but it might be time to sit up at attention. State governors from across the country met in Boston last weekend at the National Governors Association meeting, and their fiscal woes were at the top of the agenda.

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First Take: Safe Landing for Migrating Birds; Conditions of Air Conditioning; How the Light Bulb Changed the World

Wednesday, July 07, 2010

Updated 5:30pm EST

Arwa Gunja here on the evening shift.

In the 73rd minute, off a corner kick, Spain’s Carles Puyol put a ball into Germany’s net off a header. Spain now moves on to the finals in the World Cup playing against the Netherlands. The circle of World Cup winners tends to be an exclusive club - only seven countries have ever won. But this year there will surely be a new member, as neither Spain nor the Netherland have ever taken home the world championship title before. Sunday's final will be an exciting match, and tomorrow, we’ll get reactions from Spain after their semi-final victory today.

And in other sports news, Lebron James will host an hour-long ESPN special tomorrow night where he will finally announce his team of choice. Fans from cities across the country have been waiting for this moment with bated breathe. It’s a rarity in sports for an athlete to take center stage in produced, hour-long televisded event outside the arena of an actual game. And unlike a press conference, James will have full control of the event. It’s kind of like American Idol meets basketball, without the Simon and Randy factors. We'll hear more about the media spectacle tomorrow on the show.

On the international front, Iran announced new guidelines for men’s haircuts. A government official appeared alongside hundreds of barbers and hairdressers to unveil a catalog describing what hair dos will be acceptable for men. The crackdown seems intended to police “un-Islamic” dress and fight Western influences. But at the same time, none of the men featured in the catalog are wearing long beards, a cornerstone in Islamic orthodoxy. This comes at a time when Iran is facing a cultural collission between a younger generation that is seeking greater freedoms and a religious government continuing to push Sharia law.  Azadeh Moavani, the author of Lipstick Jihad, joins the program tomorrow morning to talk about the cultural and political dynamics at play.

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First Take: Expiring Unemployment; Jane Goodall on Conservation Today; Last Words from Death Row

Tuesday, July 06, 2010

Anna Sale here on the day shift.

We had a great conversation this morning that gave all of us pause in the control room. As the Senate returns this week to vote on unemployment extension, we heard from two people who have received their last unemployment check. Instead of the stark, binary political debate about the extension, their stories let us into the very emotional calculations and internal debate around asking for and taking help. We also heard from a lot of you, and we will continue this conversation tomorrow. We are reaching out to economists who can explain why the program was designed with an expiration date, and we'll ask whether that makes sense in this job market. Economist Paul Krugman already offered his assessment in a column in The New York Times this week. Tell us what you think.

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First Take: Relaunching Immigration Debate, Pot and Civil Rights, Road Trip with David Foster Wallace

Wednesday, June 30, 2010

Anna Sale here on the day shift.

We are watching two developing stories in the newsroom today. One of them, Elena Kagan's Supreme Court confirmation hearings, looks to be winding down without much more news. The other, Hurricane Alex, looks to be turning into more of a story, and a threat to coastal communities in Mexico and south Texas. We'll have thhe latest on both tomorrow morning.

We are also making calls to sources in Washington and border communities as President Obama tries to revive the debate about comprehensive immigration reform in Washington. Ahead of his speech at American University tomorrow morning, we will look at how Arizona's new immigration law has changed the terms of the debate in Washington. He's reentering the debate at a complicated moment. On the one hand, his Justice Department is eyeing a challenge to the law and boycotts in protest have rocked Arizona's economy. At the same time, polls have shown public support for the Arizona's approach and other states are considering following suit. What do you think? Are you expecting Obama to add missing nuance to the debate, as he did in his campaign speech on race, or is the battle too pitched for to remake the conversation?

Speaking of state law and debates about civil rights, this caught our eye. The NAACP of California has endorsed a November ballot measure to legal marijuana, and they're framing the cause as a civil rights issue. "This is not a war on the drug lords, this is a war against young men and women of color," the state president told the San Francisco Chronicle. We're just looking into this, but it seems like there's a lot to unpack here. 

Finally, summer is road trip season, and we'll hear about a particularly memorable adventure tomorrow. Back in 1996, David Lipsky spent five days on the road with writer David Foster Wallace, who committed suicide two years ago this September. We talk to Lipsky about his book, "Although Of Course You End Up Becoming Yourself: A Road Trip with David Foster Wallace." We also hear from Wallace's sister, Amy Wallace-Havens on her brother's legacy. We also want to hear from you: Who would you like to take a road trip with and why? Where would you go? What would you talk about?

 

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First Take: Anatomy of a Confirmation Hearing, Impact of Supreme Court Gun Ruling, Petraeus on the Hill

Monday, June 28, 2010

UPDATED 7:00 p.m.

Alex Goldmark here on the evening shift. We're adding a few stories to tomorrow's mix. The biggest is the developing story of 11 alleged Russian secret agents arrested on Sunday. The Justice Department announced they have been charged with conspiring to act as unlawful agents of the Russian Federation; nine are also charged with money laundering. One of the accused is a long time columnist for El Diario so we're reaching out to reporters who know her, as well as Russian diplomats for comment. We'll round out the details and have the full context for you by showtime. 

We'll also get a follow up on a story we covered last month about ex-Chicago Police Commander Jon Burge, who was accused of torturing suspects into confessing. He has just been convicted of perjury in covering up the torture. Here's our previous interview on the topic with one of the suspects tortured into confessing.

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Pride at 40: First NY Pride Marchers Remember

Saturday, June 26, 2010

This weekend, the New York gay pride parade celebrates its 40th anniversary. Before the throngs of crowds and corporate sponsors like Zipcar and Skyy Vodka, the march started with a question: What would happen if gay people stopped hiding and came out in the streets?

Those first marchers didn't know.

In June ...

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First Take: McChrystal is Out, Small Town Budgets, Reality TV in a Hospital

Wednesday, June 23, 2010

UPDATED 6:30 p.m.

Arwa Gunja here on the evening shift.

This week we learned that General Stanley McChrystal is the kind of man who gives his chief-of-staff the middle finger and insults his bosses without hesitation. But how much of the four-star general's behavior is just a part of a military culture and how much crosses the line? Tomorrow, we’re asking this question to two men familiar with combat culture. First Lieutenant Mike Scotti, who documented his time in Iraq in the film, “Severe Clear,” and former Army Capt. Matt Gallagher join the program to give us an insider's take on McChrystal's actions. What do you think? Did Obama do the right thing by accepting his resignation or should McChrystal have kept his job? Send your comments by calling us at 877-8-MYTAKE or leaving us a message here on our website.

With all the news today about the replacement of McChrystal, some developments in the Gulf of Mexico have been overshadowed.  BP suffered another setback today when the company was forced to remove the containment cap due to a discharge of liquid and gases. The cap had been partially successful in containing the flow of oil. Then, in a separate incident, there are reports on the deaths of two cleanup workers. Tomorrow we have on Darryl Willis, vice president of resources for BP, to clarify how BP will go about fixing its negative image.

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First Take: Anxiety Along the Gulf Coast, Libido Pill for Women? Summer Soundtrack

Thursday, June 17, 2010

Anna Sale here on the day shift.

A lot of you have told us what you would say to BP CEO Tony Hayward if you were alone with him. We've been watching his testimony on Capitol Hill today to see what members of Congress do with their opportunity. While the spotlight is on Washington, we're also continuing to reach out to people along the Gulf Coast. As the scale of this disaster sinks in, the sense of helplessness and anxiety is growing with it. We're looking at what assistance is available for residents' emotional health as they look toward this new, uncertain future.

We'll also look at the politics and science of a new drug to increase women's sexual desires. Ever since Viagra hit the market, there have been attempts to develop a companion for women. Tomorrow, the FDA will meet with a German drug giant on a new pill that they say could be the cure for "female sexual dysfunction." We'll look at the history behind this meeting and the debate it's sparked about the definition of a normal and healthy sex life for women. 

And, we'll put a little pep in your step to kick off the weekend. We begin our new summer music series tomorrow. We've asked an eclectic bunch of celebrities, fans, and friends to join us and break down what makes a GREAT summer song. You'll hear from Saturday Night Live's Fred Armisen, who got his start in entertainment as the drummer for a band called Trenchmouth. Pat Benatar will tell us why lounge singer Louis Prima means summer to her. Tomorrow, MTV VJ Sway gives us his picks.

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