Streams

Alan Cowell

Senior Correspondent for NYTimes.com

Alan Cowell appears in the following:

Underreported: Clashes in South Africa

Thursday, September 01, 2011

This week major clashes erupted in South Africa over the future of the African National Congress, the country’s ruling party since the end of apartheid. New York Times reporter Alan Cowell and Franz Krüger, Director of the Wits Radio Academy in Johannesburg, join us to explain South Africa's political scene.

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The Bleakest Generation?

Wednesday, August 10, 2011

Former London Mayor Ken Livingstone suggested that the Tottenham riot was fueled by citizens unleashing pent-up resentment over the weak economy, high unemployment rate, and historically deep budget cuts that decrease funding for poor communities in the United Kingdom. "This is the first generation since the Great Depression that have doubts about their future," he told the BBC. Those same conditions that led to the unrest in the U.K. may apply to the U.S.

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President Obama Wins Nobel Peace Prize

Friday, October 09, 2009

President Obama won the Nobel Peace Prize early this morning for “his extraordinary efforts to strengthen international diplomacy and cooperation between peoples,” according to the Nobel Committee in Oslo. We take a look at the significance of this and a look back at the history of the prestigious award with Professor Paul Martin, director of Human Rights Studies at Barnard College, the BBC's Lars Bevanger reporting from Oslo, and New York Times reporter Alan Cowell.

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International Reaction to Release of Lockerbie Bomber

Thursday, August 20, 2009

The BBC's Glen Campbell joins us from Scotland with local reaction to the impending release of Abdel Basset Ali al-Megrahi, the only person convicted and imprisoned for the 1988 bombing of a Pan Am flight over Lockerbie, Scotland. We also talk to New York Times reporter Alan Cowell about the American opposition to the release of the man many view as a fall guy for the attack.  The explosion killed 270 people, 189 of them Americans. Al-Megrahi was convicted in 2001 of murder and other charges related to the bombing, but his lawyers have successfully lobbied for his release on compassionate grounds, as he is near death from prostate cancer.

For more, listen to our earlier interview with Susan Cohen, whose daughter Theodora died on the flight.

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Pakistan officials admit Mumbai attacks were planned in Pakistan

Thursday, February 12, 2009

For the first time in public, Pakistan acknowledged that parts of the murderous attacks on Mumbai, India were planned on its soil and that they are holding several suspects. Why the sudden desire to come clean? To find answers, we turn to Alan Cowell, who is following the story for the NYTimes.com.

For more, read Alan Cowell's article, Pakistan Announces Arrests for Mumbai Attacks on NYTimes.com

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