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Adam Gopnik

Adam Gopnik appears in the following:

Exploring 3-D Sound with Adam Gopnik

Thursday, January 24, 2013

In his latest story for the New Yorker, staff writer Adam Gopnik explores the science behind the human experience of music. It all started when Gopnik realized a profound difference in the way he and his teenage children listen to music. While Gopnik and his peers grew up solemnly listening to long-form LPs on superb stereo systems, his kids "snatch at" smaller bits of music via earbuds and laptops. As he told Soundcheck's John Schaefer: "I would say, 'I can't listen to this on that lousy speaker on your computer!'"

A desire to understand this generational gap led Gopnik on a journey that spans rocket science, psychology and sociology, which he documents in his New Yorker piece, "Music To Your Ears: The Quest For 3-D Recording and Other Mysteries of Sound."

Gopnik describes visiting the lab of Edgar Choueiri, a rocket scientist determined to create a method of listening to sound in three dimensions. Choueiri allowed Gopnik to test out his “magic box” with a song of Gopnik’s choice: the Rolling Stones’ “Beast of Burden.” The experience, says Gopnik, was thrilling.

“[He] plugged it in,” he recounts, “And suddenly, there it was, Keith Richards is stabbing away with a cigar in his mouth you could practically hear on my right, and Ronnie Wood was plucking away in that kind of syncopated way he does…. Mick Jagger was somewhere right in front of me, and Charlie Watts passively was keeping time right behind my head. I had been inserted into the center of the Stones. It was a startling, uncanny experience.” 

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Adam Gopnik on the Meaning of Food

Thursday, November 22, 2012

Food is on all of our minds today, but how often do we really think about food? For Adam Gopnik, the answer is always. His latest book is "The Table Comes First: Family, France, and the Meaning of Food." 

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Adam Gopnik on the Meaning of Food

Friday, November 16, 2012

With Thanksgiving just around the corner, food is on most of our minds. But for Adam Gopnik, author and staff writer for The New Yorker, this is nothing out of the ordinary. In his most recent book, The Table Comes First, Gopnik explores the meaning of food — in culture, in family, and in society.

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Hollywood Violence Gets Real in Colorado Shooting

Friday, July 27, 2012

Adam Gopnik has written frequently — too frequently, he laments — about the gun rampages that convulse America. “The killings will go on; the cell phones in the pockets of dead children will continue to ring; and now parents can be a little frightened every time their kids go ...

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Central Park: An Anthology

Wednesday, July 25, 2012

Andrew Blauner, editor of Central Park: An Anthology, is joined by two of the collection’s contributors—author Adam Gopnik and Doug Blonsky, the senior executive responsible for managing and overseeing the park. They talk about the 843 carefully planned acres of Central Park and how it has made an impression on the 38 million annual visitors and on the lives and work of a diverse array of writers.

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Guest Picks: Adam Gopnik

Wednesday, January 04, 2012

New Yorker writer Adam Gopnik was on the Lopate Show recently to discuss his latest book about food and how our ideas about food have been shaped. He revealed that he's a Justin Bieber fan and also told what his comfort foods are, even if he doesn't love the term itself.

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Family, France, and the Meaning of Food

Wednesday, January 04, 2012

Adam Gopnik talks about the meaning of food in our lives, from 18th-century to the kitchens of the White House, the molecular meccas of Barcelona, and beyond. The Table Comes First: Family, France, and the Meaning of Food reveals that what goes on the table has never mattered as much to our lives as what goes on around the table- families, friends, lovers coming together.

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The Internet is Making Us (Blank)

Friday, August 12, 2011

Adam Gopnik, staff writer for The New Yorker, discusses how books like Dr. Elias Aboujaoude's Virtually You and Nicolas Carr's The Shallows have been tackling the subject of the Internet and how it changes the way we behave and think.

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The Internet is Making Us (Blank)

Tuesday, March 01, 2011

Adam Gopnik, staff writer for The New Yorker, discusses how books like Dr. Elias Aboujaoude's Virtually You and Nicolas Carr's The Shallows have been tackling the subject of the Internet and how it changes the way we behave and think.

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Ear Wars: Biology of Music

Wednesday, February 09, 2011

How do our brains know what to do with music?  Is the ability to distinguish music part of human DNA?  Best selling author, neuroscientist and musician Daniel J. Levitin returns to our studio with Adam Gopnik of The New Yorker to talk about the biology of music. 

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Cooking by the Book: Recipes and Cookbooks

Wednesday, November 18, 2009

With days upon days of holiday cooking ahead of us, it's the time of year when you're most likely to consult a cookbook ... or give one to your mom. Julia Moskin, New York Times food writer, and Adam Gopnik, staff writer for The New Yorker, join us for our very own cookbook roundup. Gopnik also examines the larger purpose of the cookbook in the age of the internet.

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Happy Birthday Darwin and Lincoln

Friday, February 13, 2009

In his new double biography Angels and Ages, New Yorker staff writer Adam Gopnik looks at the lives and legacies of Abraham Lincoln and Charles Darwin. Both men were born 200 years ago.

Event: Adam Gopnik will be speaking and signing books
Friday, February 13 at ...

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Happy 200th Birthday, Darwin and Lincoln

Thursday, February 12, 2009

Two hundred years ago, on February 12, 1809, a pair of cosmic twins entered the universe. Abraham Lincoln was born in a log cabin in Kentucky. Across the Atlantic, Charles Darwin was born on an English estate. When they left this earth they made an everlasting mark on the principles of democracy and human evolution. Writer Adam Gopnik gives meaning and significance to this enduring convergence in his new book Angels and Ages: A Short Book About Darwin, Lincoln, and Modern Life. He joins us now for a celebration of the 200th birthday of two amazing men.

For more on these two men, read the New York Times science article, Crunching the Data for the Tree of Life, browse Darwin's complete works online, buy the two books that will share this year's Lincoln prize for scholarship on the 16th president, and peruse William Safire's review of Lincoln literature.

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On Fatherhood

Friday, December 26, 2008

Adam Gopnik, New Yorker staff writer, and Ta-Nehisi Coates, contributing editor to The Atlantic and author of The Beautiful Struggle: A Father, Two Sons, and an Unlikely Road to Manhood, talk about fatherhood in the age of Obama.

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On Fatherhood

Monday, December 01, 2008

Adam Gopnik, New Yorker staff writer, and Ta-Nehisi Coates, contributing editor to The Atlantic and author of The Beautiful Struggle: A Father, Two Sons, and an Unlikely Road to Manhood, talk about fatherhood in the age of Obama.

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Adam Gopnik on Re-creations

Saturday, January 13, 2001

Kurt Andersen talks about re-creations with Adam Gopnik, author of Paris to the Moon. Gopnik has been writing for The New Yorker since 1986. He recently returned to New York after five years as the magazine’s Paris correspondent.

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Re-creations, Yo-Yo Ma, Civil War

Saturday, January 13, 2001

Host Kurt Andersen and special guest New Yorker critic Adam Gopnik discuss why artists, musicians and people from all walks of life choose to recreate artifacts from the past - on canvas, in the concert hall and on the battlefield. Cellist Yo-Yo Ma talks about baroque music on original instruments and New Urbanist architect Andres Duany describes creating new towns from the layout of old cities. We also profile arts educator and philosopher Maxine Greene and contemplate the design of the Post-it note.

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Recreations, Gopnik, Civil War

Saturday, November 11, 2000

Host Kurt Andersen and special guest New Yorker critic Adam Gopnik discuss why artists, musicians and people from all walks of life choose to recreate artifacts from the past - on canvas, in the concert hall and on the battlefield. Cellist Yo Yo Ma talks about baroque music on original ...

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Special Guest: Adam Gopnik

Saturday, November 11, 2000

Kurt introduces special guest New Yorker critic and author Adam Gopnik.

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