Streams

NYC To Expand Broadway Ped Plazas Tomorrow

Tuesday, September 21, 2010

(Andrea Bernstein, Transportation Nation) New York City's streetscape shifts again tomorrow, with Broadway north of Union Square getting pedestrian plazas and bike lanes, the NYC DOT announces today.

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Public Transportation as Urban Development: A Mississippi Case Study

Tuesday, September 21, 2010

(Jackie Yamanaka, Yellowstone Public Radio) As the then-Republican Mayor of Meridian, Mississippi, John Robert Smith watched as the city’s $1 million expenditure for the multi-modal Union Station blossomed into a $135 million public-private investment in the historic downtown.

Smith says the area was once a run down inner-city neighborhood. Then, Union Station became a one-stop location for Amtrak, city bus service, shuttles to the airport and a nearby Navy base. After that, restaurants and boutiques opened nearby, and the area became walkable.

“There’s a conference center there now. There’s a restored performing arts center there. There are condominiums, market rate apartments, very affordable apartments, and opportunities there in the downtown that didn’t exist 14 years ago when we opened this station.”

He says Meridian was already the retail, medical, employment, cultural, and educational center for an 11-county region. But the new transit center, he says, was what spurred new growth. Union station, he says, “became the most heavily used public space in Meridian, MS. Over 350,000 passengers a year use that station. Keep in mind you’re talking about a city of 40,000 people.”

More important, he says, it gave young people a reason to come home to rural Meridian when they graduated from college.

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Distracted Driving Is Bad. Distracted Office Working--That's Called Multitasking.

Tuesday, September 21, 2010

Today the Department of Transportation kicks off its second Distracted Driving Summit. Members of the Transportation Nation team are there and will be posting later on today.

But in the meantime: there's no need to let, say, your work schedule interfere with your desire to follow the proceedings. A recent Ray LaHood tweet reads: "Can't watch at work? Staff blogging distracted driving summit live at http://fastlane.dot.gov You can participate w/comments!"

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The Best Commute Ever

Tuesday, September 21, 2010

(San Francisco–Casey Miner, KALW News) A little after five o'clock, and you might find yourself on your way back home after a long day at work. How would you describe your commute? A drag? Hilly, boring, sweaty, tedious? Those are a few of the words people in our newsroom used to describe theirs.

But recently, we heard a man characterize his commute in this way: "Conditions: sunny and absolutely bluebird. Number of seals spotted: 8. Amount of road rage experienced: none. Number of waves surfed: about five."

Stephen Linaweaver paddles out from the South Beach Marina in San Francisco after work. Photo by Dan Suyeyasu of Oakland.

That’s how Stephen Linaweaver describes his daily commute to work crossing the San Francisco Bay in his kayak. And, as far as we know, Linaweaver is the only person to get to work this way. Want to hear what it's like out there? Listen to the full story at KALW News.

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TN Moving Stories: NJ Transit in the Hot Seat, the NYPD is Watching Straphangers, and Climate Week NYC

Tuesday, September 21, 2010

The NYPD is monitoring 500 subway cameras, 24/7. (WNYC)

Houston's Metro has been criticized for a lack of transparency.  So it's now streaming board meetings live. (KUHF)

The New York Times wrote an editorial that's critical of the Koch brothers efforts to overturn California's clean energy law on the November ballot.

NJ Transit officials are in the hot seat for bad service this summer. Just how bad? "We encountered a series of events that caused 1,400 delays," says the executive director. (Asbury Park Press)

Also in New Jersey: the money that had been allocated for the rail tunnel under the Hudson River may be used to shore up the Transportation Trust Fund. (Star Ledger)

It's like magic: with a wave of your hand, you can ride the San Francisco Muni for free. D'OH! (San Francisco Weekly)

New York's state Public Transportation Safety Board wants subway motormen to have an early warning system to reduce track deaths. (NY Daily News)

And just in time for the UN General Assembly: it's Climate Week NYC, a series of events focused on global warming.

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Capital Bikeshare Launches, But Who Will Be Sharing The Bikes?

Tuesday, September 21, 2010

(Washington, DC — David Schultz, WAMU) A new regional bike sharing program launches today. Riders can rent a bicycle for a few hours at several dozen stations in D.C. and Northern Virginia.

Marti Reinfeld is a big BikeShare fan. She can now easily make short trips within the city, instead of having to commute in all the way from home. "I can ride it in a skirt and heels - that's what I'm most excited about - so I don't have to change after work to ride my bike," she says.  Ed Neugent says - as he rides one of the red and yellow BikeShare bikes - he'll use the service to get to work meetings. "Sometimes our meetings are held in other buildings and a lot of times we can probably hop on a bike and go to the meeting if we can't get a vehicle to travel. Plus, it's a good form of exercise too," he says.

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Election report: Give us Transportation, Just Don't Make Us Pay for It

Monday, September 20, 2010

(Wilkes-Barre, PA -- Andrea Bernstein, Transportation Nation)How’s President Obama’s plan to spend $50 billion on infrastructure selling?Judging by my interaction with musician Debbie Horoschock in Luzerne County, PA last week, not too well.

“It should all be fixed,” she told me, of the president’s proposal to spend money fixing rail, roads, and airports.So she thinks that would be a good thing to spend money on?“No.But they should be fixed.”How are they going to be fixed without money? “I don't know how they are going to be fixed without money. But we need money to fix the damn roads.”

Horuschock, who had long black hair and plays in a polka band, was out shopping on a Thursday afternoon in the Wilkes-Barre farmers market (by the way, when you get out of major cities, farmers markets are a good cheap place to get vegetables, not lightening rods for the young and well-to-do.)In 2008, like the majority of this hardscrabble county, she voted for Obama for President.But everyone she knows is out of work (this area has the highest unemployment in the state), and there’s just no money to pay for anything.

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Christie Casts Further Doubt on Transit Tunnel

Monday, September 20, 2010

(WNYC News) One week into a 30-day review a new transit tunnel connecting New Jersey to Manhattan, New Jersey Governor Chris Christie says he's not confident that the project will come in under the budget of 8.7 billion dollars.

"I've seen estimates that take this from 2 to 5 billion over budget. Where am I going to get this money? I don't have an answer to that. So I want to know exactly what I'm biting off before I take another bite and start chewing.]

Speaking on WOR this morning, Christie suggested that the federal government should consider stepping up with more money.

NJ Transit and the Port Authority are each contributing 3 billion dollars to the project, which is among the largest stimulus-funded initiatives in the country -- about another $1 billion.

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LaHood: Distracted Driving Caused 5500 deaths in 2009

Monday, September 20, 2010

Writing in the Orlando Sentinal, U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood writes that the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reports at least 5500 deaths and 450,000 injuries in 2009 from calling or texting while driving. At least, because many local police departments still don't record this information when taking accident reports. Texting while driving, LaHood writes, is like driving "the length of a football field blindfolded."

Ending distracted driving has become a cause celebre for LaHood. Tomorrow he'll convene his second annual distracted driving summit in DC.

-- Andrea Bernstein, Transportation Nation

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TN Moving Stories: Nassau County and the MTA Play Chicken, and Biking over the Eastern Continental Divide

Monday, September 20, 2010

Are we finally ready to become pod people? Personal rapid transit systems, or P.R.T.s, are being piloted in London, jealously eyed by San Jose.  "Just get in the car, punch in a destination and the pod car travels directly there without stopping at other stations along the way." (New York Times)

Philadelphia's SEPTA wants to capture the energy made by braking subway cars. (Philadelphia Business Journal)

Alexandria considers add-on tax to fund transportation projects. (WAMU)

Second Avenue Sagas writes: "Yet again, a conflict between Nassau County and the MTA is boiling over, and officials on both sides of the table are digging in for a great game of chicken."

The Allegheny Trail Alliance wants "roll-on/roll-off" service for bikers who use Amtrak's Pittsburgh-to-DC line. (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette)  Alternatively, you could just bike the whole 300 miles.

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Private Commuter Vans Come to Discontinued Bus Routes

Sunday, September 19, 2010

(Andrea Bernstein, Transportation Nation) Five bus routes that were cut last June will get private commuter vans beginning Monday. Three of the routes (the B71, B23, and B39) are in Brooklyn and two Q74 and Q79) in Queens. The private commuter vans are a bit of a gambit for the New York City Taxi and Limosine Commission, which is trying to fill part of the hole left by the bus cuts. So called "dollar vans" --which will actually cost $2 (no metrocards accepted) are privately run, and will pick up passengers at some of the cut bus stops -- and drop off anywhere along the routes. They'll help knit together some communities which otherwise can't be traversed with public transportation, or that aren't served by subways.

The NYC Transport Workers Union had initially opposed the vans, then said it would run it's own, then dropped the idea.

Dollar vans are popular in parts of the Caribbean and in third world locales that don't have public transportation.

More, and a map, from WNYC.

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The Jonas Brothers Want Teens To Take the Pledge

Friday, September 17, 2010

The Jonas Brothers appear in a video urging young drivers to pledge to "X the TXT" -- an Allstate-funded campaign to stop texting while driving.   Sample comment on the Facebook page: i took the pledge even tho i cant legally drive yett!! ♥

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Tornado-ed Car

Friday, September 17, 2010

(Park Slope, Brooklyn -- Andrea Bernstein, Transportation Nation)

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Move Over, Electric Cars

Friday, September 17, 2010

Eric Schultz for Transportation Nation

(Washington, DC - Todd Zwillich, Transportation Nation) The world's premier ultra-efficient vehicle has a gas engine.

It's the Edison 2 Very Light Car, and it just won the $5 million Automotive X Prize for highly-efficient, production-ready vehicles. The Edison 2 gets 102.5 miles per gallon and it does it without plug-in capability, hybrid technology, or solar power.

The prize, put up by Progressive Automitive was awarded Thursday in Washington DC at an even attended by members of Congress, including Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.).

Oliver Kuttner, founder of Edison 2, said his company was motivated to build the car entirely by the prospect of winning the X Automotive Prize

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TN Moving Stories: Oil Boom Agony and Ecstasy, CA drivers still texting despite ban, and old NYC Subway Cars Walk the Plank

Friday, September 17, 2010

California drivers are still texting while behind the wheel. At approximately twice the rate they were texting before the state ban went into affect last year. (Los Angeles Times)  Meanwhile, a battle is shaping up over a ballot initiative that would suspend that state's stringent greenhouse gas emissions rules. (New York Times)

Oil boom in North Dakota drives up revenue -- and rents. (Minnesota Public Radio)

BART votes to approve the Oakland Airport Connector.  Again.  (SF Streetsblog)

Shareholders of United and Continental Airlines vote today on the proposed merger.  (Marketplace)

Where do old NYC subway cars go?  Hint: their passengers now include black sea bass and flounder. WNYC takes a look at a photo exhibit of their watery graves.

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Maryland Race Could Put Transit Projects On The Line

Thursday, September 16, 2010

(Washington, DC — Todd Zwillich, Transportation Nation) Funding for some high-profile public transit projects could be on the line in Maryland's upcoming race for governor.

Now that former governor Bob Ehrlich has defeated Tea Party favorite Brian Murphy for the GOP nomination, battle lines may forming around transit projects in Baltimore and in the Maryland suburbs around Washington, DC.

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TN Moving Stories: Taking on Railroad Pricing, Colorado Highways Tip Into the "poor" column, and X Prize Marks the Fuel-Efficient Spot

Thursday, September 16, 2010

Do railroads have too much pricing power over farmers? Some say yes, and the head of the federal Surface Transportation Board says he's considering new rules governing freight rail pricing. (Wall Street Journal)

A penny for your thoughts: most Fulton County mayors say they support a one-cent sales tax to fund transportation. But since the referendum is two years away, let the legislative games begin! (Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Streetsblog takes a look at three "transit villains" who went down in this week's New York primary. Meanwhile, the New York Times wonders if Eric Schneiderman's past as a public-interest lawyer suing the MTA will win him votes in November.

X Prize marks the fuel-efficient spot: three teams split $10 million prize to create fuel efficient cars. (NPR)  Hey, one of the winners is from Virginia!  (WAMU)

For the first time since state transportation officials began documenting road conditions, more than half of all Colorado's DOT-maintained highways are in poor condition. (Denver Post)

New Yorkers, get your lawn chairs and astroturf and prepare to reclaim some parking spaces: Park(ing) Day NYC is tomorrow. Click here to find a Park(ing) spot.

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Federal Funds Tied to Distracted Driving Laws

Wednesday, September 15, 2010

(Washington, DC -- Todd Zwillich, Transportation Nation)  Lawmakers in Washington are moving to withhold federal highway funds to states that don't crack down on distracted driving.

A new bill introduced today would dock 25% of annual federal aid from states that don't enact or enforce distracted driving laws. The bill goes by the catchy handle, "The Avoiding Life-Endangering and Reckless Texting by Drivers Act", or ALERT Act.

The bill orders the Department of Transportation to withhold the money from any state that doesn't prohibit an operator of a motor vehicle from writing, sending, or reading a text message or using a hand-held mobile telephone except in an emergency. It excludes vehicle-integrated, voice-activated devices that can be operated hands-free. States would also have to require the imposition of certain minimum penalties for distracted driving rule-breakers.

"There is no reason for any life to be lost due to distracted driving. We are a smart nation and the technology is available, we just need to put it to work to save lives,” Rep. Carolyn McCarthy (D-NY), the bill's chief sponsor, said in a release.

Thirty-one states currently ban texting while driving, according to AAA. Thirty-two outlaw teens from using cell phones while driving, while far fewer ban all hand-held cell phone use.

The bill comes just days before DOT is set to convene its second "Distracted Driving Summit" next Tuesday. DOT Secretary Ray LaHood has made distracted driving a top priority, saying all states should move to curb it. Several months ago LaHood publicly embarrassed a pair of lobbying firms when they tried to rally cell service carriers and other companies in a campaign to undermine distracted driving awareness campaigns at DOT.

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Christie Owns His Role in Halting Giant Transit Tunnel; Planners Dismayed.

Wednesday, September 15, 2010

(Andrea Bernstein, Transportation Nation) "People who use New Jersey Transit have to pay for New Jersey Transit." That's what Governor Chris Christie told the Star-Ledger Editorial Board last spring. NJ Transit fares hadn't been raised in years, he argued, and that wasn't responsible. But neither, a member of the board pointed out, had the gas tax. In fact, the fare had been raised three years earlier -- the gas tax, not in 21 years. "What's the difference between a gas tax hike and a fare hike -- besides who it lands on?" asked another of the journalists.

"That's the difference," Christie said. "My policy choice is that drivers have paid increased tolls two years in the last four years and I didn't think it was their turn to feel the pain." (The Tri-State Transportation Campaign fact-checks that -- they say it's actually been one raise, in seven years.)

Christie seems to making a similar policy choice today: with the highway trust fund broke, and no money to pay for roads, Christie says he's reluctant to use state funds to pay for a transit tunnel. Not when there are so many other pressing infrastructure needs. "And if I can’t pay for it, then we’ll have to consider other options," he told reporters.

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Shallow Waters Tarred With Deepwater Brush

Wednesday, September 15, 2010

(Houston — Wendy Siegle, KUHF)   There may be a moratorium on deepwater drilling, but that doesn't mean the Gulf of Mexico's shallow waters are immune from stricter regulation. More stringent rules mean the federal government is now taking longer to grant permits to operate in the shallow waters, and drillers aren't pleased.

(Oil Rigs near Huntington Beach/Aaron Logan)

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