Streams

Sol Yurick on Reader's Almanac, 1979

Monday, January 07, 2013

WNYC

Sol Yurick discusses his novel The Warriors and its film adaptation.

 


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Congressman Ed Koch on rent control reform, 1967

Thursday, December 27, 2012

WNYC

Congressman Edward I. Koch speaks on a telephone interview about rent control, including an upcoming rally.

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The Scrappy Wunderkind of the Bronx Projects: Author Richard Price on Reader's Almanac, 1978

Thursday, December 20, 2012

WNYC

In this 1978 episode of Reader's Almanac, host Jack Sullivan interviews Richard Price, 28, on the publication of his third novel, Ladies’ Man.

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God and taxes: A newly discovered Eisenhower talk

Tuesday, December 04, 2012

In newly recovered audio from our collections, Dwight D. Eisenhower addresses a Books and Authors Luncheon audience. Historian David Pietrusza weighs in on the surviving audio from the Nov 23, 1948 speech.

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Jazz Great Pete La Roca on Around New York

Monday, December 03, 2012

WNYC

Host Steve Sullivan brings legendary jazz drummer Pete La Roca onto Around New York for an interview about a life and career in jazz. 

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Hal Holbrook Takes on Twain

Friday, November 30, 2012

WNYC

In this 1959 episode of Recordings, E.T.C., Host Edward Tatnall Canby presents the "voices" of two canonical storytellers: Mark Twain and Hans Christian Andersen. Neither Twain nor Andersen is actually featured on these recordings, but Canby delights in the authenticity of Hal Holbrook's portrayal of Twain and Boris Karloff's readings of Andersen's tales.

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So long, Stag

Monday, November 19, 2012

Longtime New York Public Radio engineer Jim Stagnito, a.k.a. Stag, bid the station farewell last week.

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Will Barnet on WNYC: 40 Years Ago Today

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

WNYC

The Archives Department celebrates the life of artist Will Barnet with this WNYC interview from 1972, precisely 40 years ago today. Last year, at the age of 100, Barnet had a widely acclaimed retrospective at the National Academy.  The show highlighted a long and prolific career for an artist whose worked spanned - and survived - every important artistic movement in the 20th century.  Barnet passed away yesterday.

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David Durk's Moving Testimony Before the Knapp Commission

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

David Durk, the New York police detective who teamed up with officer Frank Serpico to breach the aptly named 'blue wall of silence' died yesterday. His testimony before the Knapp Commission investigation into police corruption in 1971 made for some of the most moving public testimony ever broadcast.  Writing in The New York Times Book Review, WNYC Director Mary Perot Nichols said it was largely thanks to Durk's persistence and contacts that their campaign against police corruption became a matter of public record. Above is an excerpt from his remarks on December 21, 1971.

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The Marine Corps General Who Called War 'A Racket'

Sunday, November 11, 2012

In 1989 National Public Radio commissioned me to produce a Veterans Day documentary piece on General Smedley Butler, the consummate American soldier.
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NPR LIbrarian Kee Malesky in New York

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Kee Malesky, NPR’s longest-serving librarian, was in New York on October 15 for a talk and an afternoon “salon”. Sponsored by METRO, she was promoting her recently-published, second book, Learn Something New Every Day.

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Utah Phillips, Will Rogers, and Tall Tales of America's First Radio Broadcast

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

WNYC

“I guarantee, that if I am elected, I will take over the White House, hang out, shoot pool, scratch my ass, and not do a damn thing.  Which is to say, if you want something done, don't come to me to do it for you; you got to get together and figure out how to do it yourselves.  Is that a deal?” - Utah Phillips

"Never blame a legislative body for not doing something. When they do nothing, that don't hurt anybody. When they do something is when they become dangerous." - Will Rogers

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Early Electronic Music on WNYC

Wednesday, October 03, 2012

WNYC

In this 1974 episode of Musicale, Hubert S. Howe, Jr., selects a few original electronic music compositions synthesized at Queens College. Howe was one of the earliest progenitors of computer music.

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One Thousand Days: Salman Rushdie at Columbia, 1991

Thursday, September 27, 2012

On December 11, 1991, Salman Rushdie "quietly ventured outside Britain and emerged" [1] to speak at a Columbia University dinner celebrating the 200th anniversary of the First Amendment. The thunderous applause that greets Mr Rushdie's unexpected appearance sets the tone for his speech.

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Pioneering Language Classes Over WNYC

Friday, September 14, 2012

Between the summer of 1925 and spring 1932, Victor Harrison-Berlitz, the General Manager of 410 U.S. Berlitz language schools, taught French, Spanish, German and Italian over WNYC. The regular classes were a pioneering effort for American radio.

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Audio dada: A precursor to John Cage's 4'33", 20 years earlier

Thursday, September 13, 2012

As New Sounds celebrates composer John Cage's 100th birthday, we at the WNYC archives add our own, irreverent archival item to the celebration: a WMCA News Parade program with an eerie premonition of John Cage's famous "silent" piece, 4'33".

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Macklin Marrow and the WNYC Concert Orchestra

Friday, August 03, 2012

From July 1939 to March 1942, conductor and composer Macklin Marrow led the WNYC Concert Orchestra. The 35-piece ensemble was sponsored by The New York City Music Project, a unit of the federal Works Progress Administration (WPA). One of Marrow's earliest assignments at the station was the August 2, 1939, dedication of the WNYC WPA murals when the orchestra performed the scherzo from William Grant Still's Afro-American Symphony (audio above).

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Morris S. Novik: Public Radio Pioneer

Friday, July 13, 2012

Morris S. Novik was appointed by Mayor F. H. La Guardia to be the first Director of the Municipal Broadcasting System on February 9, 1938. During the nearly eight years he oversaw WNYC, he tirelessly worked to make the station an innovative and model public broadcaster. In fact, Novik laid claim to coining the phrase "public broadcasting" while at WNYC.

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Ralph Berton: The Man Behind Radio's First Serious Jazz Music Program

Friday, June 01, 2012

From 1940 to 1942 Ralph Berton hosted WNYC's daily foray into jazz called Metropolitan Review, dedicated to "the finest in recorded hot jazz." The program was radio's first serious jazz music show on the air. 

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Doc Watson Philadelphia Folk Festival circa 1970

Wednesday, May 30, 2012

WNYC

Join the Archives department in celebrating the life of Doc Watson with this rare interview and performance at the Philadelphia Folk Festival. 

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