Streams

Talk To Me: Sharon Olds Introduction

Monday, April 21, 2014

Poet, author and NYU professor Sharon Olds was joined by her twin nephews Michael & Matthew Dickman at NYU's Lillian Vernon Creative Writers House on March 4th, 2010.

In this session of NYU's Reading Series, Olds read from both old collections and poems she finished on the train that day. The Portland-born Dickman brothers describe how got the "love movement" started with their award-winning fraternally and familiarly inspired poetry.

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Pushcart Prize Winning Introduction

Monday, April 21, 2014

Four Pushcart Prize-winning writers took to the (very, very dim stage) at (Le) Poisson Rouge in 2010 to read from their award-winning works.

The night showcased poetry and prose by Kate Walbert, Marie Howe, Dale Peck and Mark Doty. From pieces set in the past, to ones that reflect on the future, the reading offered a wide variety of work (along with lots of writerly banter). Pushcart Press founder Bill Henderson introduces this excerpt of the reading, which features Kate Walbert and Marie Howe.

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Darwin: A Life of Poems Introduction

Monday, April 21, 2014

On the Origin of Species more than 150 years old, but the work of Charles Darwin remains as influential as ever. Darwin's great-great-granddaughter, Ruth Padel, tells her famous ancestor's life story all in verse. One poem describes Darwin's awe at the sealife that washed up on the deck of the Beagle. Another tackles how Charles' scientific ideas did not square with his wife Emma's deep religious faith. Listen now to Darwin, A Life in Poems.

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Philip Levine Introduction

Monday, April 21, 2014

This segment with Philip Levine was produced just before he  became the nation's Poet Laureate. Already WNYC's Poet in Residence back in 2003, Levine reads William Matthews' "Mingus at the Half Note," and how the poem relates personally to him.

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Connie Converse Walking In the Dark Introduction

Monday, April 21, 2014

Connie Converse Walking In the Dark, is a special edition of WNYC's Spinning On Air with David Garland. Listen now to many of Connie's songs for the first time, her story with interviews, commentary, and readings from her letters, journals, and poetry from a November 25, 2012 broadcast.

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National Poetry Month and Natasha Trethewey introduction

Monday, April 21, 2014

April is National Poetry Month! Listen to current Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey, Samuel Menash, the 2013 winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry, Sharon Olds, as well as Louis Utermeyer, Dylan Thomas, Robert Pinsky, Archibald MacLeish, Marianne Moore —and other anapestic treats.

Natasha Trethewey is the first African American to hold the title of Poet Laureate since Rita Dove in 1993. She’s also the first Southerner since Robert Penn Warren — one of the first Laureates. Listen now to Trethewey from The Takeaway, July 6, 2012.

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We Know What You Like

Monday, April 21, 2014

From the May, 1941 WQXR Program Guide:

"My little boy, aged 4, has very definite likes and dislikes in music. He will sit as quiet as a mouse all through Tchaikowsky's Symphony Pathetique..."

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Happy Earth Day - Now Move Your Car

Monday, April 21, 2014

WNYC

On the first Earth Day - that would be April 22, 1970 - Mayor John V. Lindsay implores New Yorkers to be more thoughtful with their parking.

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An Opera Impresario Looks at Radio

Monday, April 14, 2014

From the March, 1941 WQXR Program Guide:

The magic of radio has broadened the ranks of the Metropolitan Opera audience until it extends from coast to coast and beyond to the countries of South America. But radio has not been able to bring back to our stage the great voices of the past which were stilled before opera performances went on the air, nor can it repeat an opera again and again to satisfy the appetite of the enthusiast.

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A Walking Tour of Don Draper's New York

Friday, April 11, 2014

WNYC

The year is 1971. Manhattan's Fur District is booming and Mad Men's Don Draper is about to enter a decade of possibilities (or not).

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Music For American Youth

Monday, April 07, 2014

From the January, 1941 WQXR Program Guide:

Mr. Ganz is conductor of the Young People's Chorus of the New York Philharmonic-Symphony Society. He is a pioneer in the field of children's concerts, having directed such concerts for the past eighteen years. The Young People's Concerts from Town Hall, New York, January 13th and February 17th at 3:45 P.M. will be broadcast by WQXR.

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Why Are These Men Twisting a Fish?

Thursday, April 03, 2014

WNYC

Before the Fulton Fish Market moved to the Bronx in 2005, nearly 2,000 men spent their early mornings down on South Street between Fulton and Beekman at one of the oldest and busiest open air markets in the country.

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What a New Cold War Could Sound Like

Wednesday, April 02, 2014

One thing about the Cold War: It made for some great radio. 

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The Place of Radio in Musical Education

Monday, March 31, 2014

From the April, 1941 WQXR Program Guide:

Mr. Hutcheson is President of the Juilliard School of Music in New York. In addition to being a great pianist and teacher, he is the author of numerous books on music, including the recently published "A Musical Guide to Richard Wagner's Ring of the Nibelung."

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The Classics on Broadway

Monday, March 24, 2014

From the October, 1944 WQXR Program Guide:

The success which has attended the presentation on Broadway of new forms of music of great composers such as Bizet, Johann Strauss and Grieg has aroused a certain amount of resentment among music purists. As one of them remarked about Carmen Jones: "The orchestration of Bizet's music was expert and adequate, but I still prefer my Bizet straight, if you don't mind."

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Hello Future, Can You Hear Me?

Friday, March 21, 2014

Last week we presented an allegory for retrieving audio, where we compared it to listening to a distant radio station. Of course, that is only half of what audio archivists do: the other half is to try to extend the reach of that signal into the future.

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Who Likes Good Music?*

Monday, March 17, 2014

The following essay was written for the December, 1942  WQXR Program Guide by the Elliott M. Sanger, Executive Vice President  and Co-founder of the Interstate Broadcasting Company, Inc., WQXR's owner.

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Hello Past, I Can Hear You!

Friday, March 14, 2014

WNYC

Picture yourself on a weekend retreat in a rented cabin in the woods, not far from your home. Although you love the isolation (no wi-fi, no TV), you would like to listen to your favorite radio show on Saturday afternoon¹. After looking around, you find a cheap clock radio in the bedroom and, at the appointed time, you fiddle with the (maddeningly small) tuner wheel, tune the (analog) dial, and hope that your favorite station's signal reaches your receiver's dinky little antenna.

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A Statement Regarding "Singing Commercials" *

Monday, March 10, 2014

The following statement was published in the May, 1944 WQXR Program Guide.

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A Song For the Melting Snow

Friday, March 07, 2014

WNYC

Celebrate the retreat of winter with an extraordinary performance of The Waters of March. It's not just a song about Spring, it's a song about "the rebirth of the human spirit."

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