Streams

Kurt Vonnegut: "Fates Worse Than Death"

Wednesday, June 11, 2014

His humorous and edgy 1982 “sermon” took on the question of whether hydrogen bombs would deliver us from more terrifying circumstances. A literary classic, the full audio recording is now available for the first time.

Read More

Comment

Hear the Men Who Saw D-Day from Both Sides

Friday, June 06, 2014

Today marks the 70th anniversary of the largest amphibious invasion in history, where 156,000 Allied troops landed on five French beaches. But there’s a lot to learn from individual soldiers — American and German — who saw it happen. Their voices are preserved in this special from our Archives.

Read More

Comments [4]

Listen to the First Detailed Account of the Tiananmen Square Massacre

Monday, June 02, 2014

Shen Tong was one of China's most famous dissident leaders. Six days after the bloody suppression of student protesters at Beijing's Tiananmen Square, he walked out of the country, came to America, and gave this press conference.

Read More

Comments [2]

The Man Who Fought For and Founded WNYC

Thursday, May 29, 2014

WNYC
WNYC's founding: A story from the dawn of the Radio Age.
Read More

Comment

Beautiful and Disturbing 'Peter and the Wolf' Album Covers

Friday, May 23, 2014

The most popular children's piece ever spawned some pretty wild art — and many surprising celebrity cameos. Take a look and tell us your favorites.
Read More

Comments [24]

It's been 23 Years Since this Live Sun Ra Concert Has Been Heard

Wednesday, May 21, 2014

WNYC

Senior Concert Recording Engineer Ed Haber, recorded Sun Ra in 1991 and has this recollection.

Read More

Comments [2]

Leader of American Anthropology Launches WNYC Series

Tuesday, May 13, 2014

American scientists and intellectuals in the fight against fascism before World War II.

Read More

Comment

A Report to Listeners

Monday, May 12, 2014

When WQXR was a commercial station sponsorship was a selective affair.

Read More

Comments [1]

A Very Weird Song About Adolf Hitler

Wednesday, May 07, 2014

Decades before Mel Brooks made it okay to sing about Hitler, an obscure singer recorded this defiant song about the Fuhrer. Just a two weeks later, in September 1940, the Germans bombarded London.

Read More

Comments [3]

Boys in the Bach Room

Monday, May 05, 2014

From the June, 1943 WQXR Program Guide:

Editorial Note: You know that various organizations are doing a great deal to bring music to the boys in the armed forces. But here is what one anonymous private is doing for himself. We at WQXR were amused and pleased when we read it and thought you would enjoy it, too. So through the courtesy of Common Sense magazine in which publication's May issue it appeared, we bring you this down-to-earth appreciation of good music.

Read More

Comment

She Woke Up Like: Gypsy Rose Lee

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Few writers begin their appearance at The Herald Tribune's prestigious Books and Authors Luncheon series by doing a striptease, but Gypsy Rose Lee feels it is expected of her. In this 1957 segment, the famous American burlesque entertainer talks about her just-published memoirs, reminiscing in particular about her early days in show business, when she was second banana to her sister June and even more overshadowed by the imposing figure of "Mother."

Read More

Comment

She Woke Up Like: Eleanor Roosevelt

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

To generate interest in a series of talent shows benefiting the 1957 March of Dimes, Eleanor Roosevelt tried her hand as an amateur disc jockey on WNYC. In this excerpt, Mrs. Roosevelt takes requests from her studio audience, and finds out just 'what the kids are listening to these days.'

Read More

Comment

She Woke Up Like: Bella Azbug

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Bella Abzug was a lawyer, a member of congress, a social activist and leader of the Women's Movement. In 1971, Abzug, along with Gloria Steinem and Betty Friedan, founded the National Women's Political Caucus. During the 1972 fight to keep her Manhattan congressional district, Abzug sits down with reporter Eleanor Fischer.

Read More

Comment

She Woke Up Like: Ultra Violet

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Listen to a first-hand account of the colorful milieu surrounding Andy Warhol and the 1960s New York ‘underground.’  Factory denizen and Superstar, Ultra Violet, speaks with Ruth Bowman in this 1968 interview on WNYC’s Views on Art.

Read More

Comment

She Woke Up Like: Jane Jacobs

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Activist, journalist, and author Jane Jacobs was well known for her opposition to Robert Moses and his plans to re-shape New York’s urban landscape. Jacobs was instrumental in the eventual cancellation of the Lower Manhattan Expressway, which would have passed directly through Washington Square Park and in 1968 she was arrested for inciting a crowd at a public hearing on the project.

Read More

Comment

She Woke Up Like: Althea Gibson

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

In 1957, right after her first victory at Wimbledon, WNYC aired this official reception for tennis star Althea Gibson.  Gibson won 11 grand slam tournaments during her career, was the first black athlete of either gender to break into the international tennis world, and many have called her one of the greatest tennis players of all time.  At this reception, Mayor Robert F. Wagner awards her with a special medal of honor from the city of New York.

Read More

Comment

The Irascible Hedda Sterne

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Though a working artist for the span of some 80 years, Hedda Sterne may be best known for simply being in a photograph featuring some of the brightest stars of the Abstract Expressionist movement in America. In this interview with Views on Art host Ruth Bowman we gain some insight into the artist behind the photograph, midway through a long and successful career.

Read More

Comment

Memoirist and Romance Novelist Fannie Hurst

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Largely forgotten today, Fannie Hurst was for many years one of the most highly paid and widely read novelists of her time. Anatomy of Me is Hurst's just-published autobiography, which she discusses at this 1958 Books and Authors Luncheon.

Read More

Comment

Before it was Popular, it Was Dangerous

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Few writers begin their appearance at The Herald Tribune's prestigious Books and Authors Luncheon series by doing a striptease, but Gypsy Rose Lee feels it is expected of her.  

After taking off her gloves, hat, and earrings she stops, there being no "row of bald men" for her to look out over. Squinting, refusing to wear glasses, confiding she has "40-year-old eyes and a 20-year-old body," she talks about her just-published memoirs, reminiscing in particular about her early days in show business, when she was second banana to her sister June and even more overshadowed by the imposing figure of "Mother."

Read More

Comment

Eleanor Roosevelt Takes the Mic

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

To generate interest in a series of talent shows benefiting the 1957 March of Dimes, Eleanor Roosevelt tried her hand as an amateur disc jockey on WNYC.

"I think I'm beginning to get the feeling of my new career," the former First Lady remarked. "Just sitting down, saying nothing and spinning records is extremely peaceful for a change. Is this all I have to do?"

Audio courtesy of the NYC Municipal Archives WNYC Collection.

Read More

Comments [6]