Streams

Credits and Music

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Special thanks. Music on this track is from an "“Eighteen year-old South Carolina folk singer (as well as Café Society darling and WNYC favorite) Susan Reed performs in American Music Festival's program no. 94, accompanied by her Irish harp and of course her zither.”

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She Woke Up Like: Gypsy Rose Lee

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Few writers begin their appearance at The Herald Tribune's prestigious Books and Authors Luncheon series by doing a striptease, but Gypsy Rose Lee feels it is expected of her. In this 1957 segment, the famous American burlesque entertainer talks about her just-published memoirs, reminiscing in particular about her early days in show business, when she was second banana to her sister June and even more overshadowed by the imposing figure of "Mother."

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She Woke Up Like: Eleanor Roosevelt

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

To generate interest in a series of talent shows benefiting the 1957 March of Dimes, Eleanor Roosevelt tried her hand as an amateur disc jockey on WNYC. In this excerpt, Mrs. Roosevelt takes requests from her studio audience, and finds out just 'what the kids are listening to these days.'

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She Woke Up Like: Bella Azbug

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Bella Abzug was a lawyer, a member of congress, a social activist and leader of the Women's Movement. In 1971, Abzug, along with Gloria Steinem and Betty Friedan, founded the National Women's Political Caucus. During the 1972 fight to keep her Manhattan congressional district, Abzug sits down with reporter Eleanor Fischer.

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She Woke Up Like: Ultra Violet

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Listen to a first-hand account of the colorful milieu surrounding Andy Warhol and the 1960s New York ‘underground.’  Factory denizen and Superstar, Ultra Violet, speaks with Ruth Bowman in this 1968 interview on WNYC’s Views on Art.

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She Woke Up Like: Jane Jacobs

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Activist, journalist, and author Jane Jacobs was well known for her opposition to Robert Moses and his plans to re-shape New York’s urban landscape. Jacobs was instrumental in the eventual cancellation of the Lower Manhattan Expressway, which would have passed directly through Washington Square Park and in 1968 she was arrested for inciting a crowd at a public hearing on the project.

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She Woke Up Like: Althea Gibson

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

In 1957, right after her first victory at Wimbledon, WNYC aired this official reception for tennis star Althea Gibson.  Gibson won 11 grand slam tournaments during her career, was the first black athlete of either gender to break into the international tennis world, and many have called her one of the greatest tennis players of all time.  At this reception, Mayor Robert F. Wagner awards her with a special medal of honor from the city of New York.

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The Irascible Hedda Sterne

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Though a working artist for the span of some 80 years, Hedda Sterne may be best known for simply being in a photograph featuring some of the brightest stars of the Abstract Expressionist movement in America. In this interview with Views on Art host Ruth Bowman we gain some insight into the artist behind the photograph, midway through a long and successful career.

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Memoirist and Romance Novelist Fannie Hurst

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Largely forgotten today, Fannie Hurst was for many years one of the most highly paid and widely read novelists of her time. Anatomy of Me is Hurst's just-published autobiography, which she discusses at this 1958 Books and Authors Luncheon.

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Before it was Popular, it Was Dangerous

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Few writers begin their appearance at The Herald Tribune's prestigious Books and Authors Luncheon series by doing a striptease, but Gypsy Rose Lee feels it is expected of her.  

After taking off her gloves, hat, and earrings she stops, there being no "row of bald men" for her to look out over. Squinting, refusing to wear glasses, confiding she has "40-year-old eyes and a 20-year-old body," she talks about her just-published memoirs, reminiscing in particular about her early days in show business, when she was second banana to her sister June and even more overshadowed by the imposing figure of "Mother."

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Eleanor Roosevelt Takes the Mic

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

To generate interest in a series of talent shows benefiting the 1957 March of Dimes, Eleanor Roosevelt tried her hand as an amateur disc jockey on WNYC.

"I think I'm beginning to get the feeling of my new career," the former First Lady remarked. "Just sitting down, saying nothing and spinning records is extremely peaceful for a change. Is this all I have to do?"

Audio courtesy of the NYC Municipal Archives WNYC Collection.

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Our Woman in Berlin: Hallie Burnett

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

On assignment for Reader’s Digest, Burnett was charged with reporting on the conditions of the East German refugees, who were “coming over at that time at about 2,000 a night.” Amidst a quiet week, she describes the night of August 13 when the foundations for the Berlin wall were laid. She describes standing among Berliners at the Brandenburg Gate, who were so shocked they had not yet found their voices to protest.

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Photojournalist Dickey Chapelle at the Oversees Press Club

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

At a time when wartime journalism was almost exclusively the territory of men, photojournalist Dickey Chapelle, blazed a trail as an award winning war correspondent, setting herself apart from other journalists with her ability to gain access to rebel groups, including those in Hungary, Cuba and South Vietnam. Her awards include the National Press Photographers Association’s 1963 "Photograph of the Year" award and the U.S. Marine Corps Combat Correspondents Association Distinguished Service Award.

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Congresswoman Bella Abzug Won't Be Marginalized

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

In March, 1972, reporter Eleanor Fischer interviewed Congresswoman Bella Abzug as she was fighting to hold on to her Congressional district in Manhattan encompassing, in part, the Battery, the Lower East Side, Little Italy, Chinatown, Greenwich Village and Chelsea.

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Factory Girl Ultra Violet on WNYC

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Listen to a first-hand account of the colorful milieu surrounding Andy Warhol and the 1960s New York ‘underground’ from Factory denizen and Superstar, Ultra Violet in this Views on Art interview with Ruth Bowman.

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Jane Jacobs Defends Urbanism in 1960s New York City Planning

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Jane Jacobs, in this 1962 appearance at a Books and Authors Luncheon, explains her current role as a community leader in the fight against what she views as the excesses and excrescences of the arrogant Modernist redesign of city neighborhoods.

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Tennis Champion Althea Gibson Notches a Historic Win

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Official reception for tennis star Althea Gibson after her ticket-tape parade, right after her first victory at Wimbledon.

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Important Women: Celebrating Women's History Month

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

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Listen to Rare, Beautiful Music from the Robeson Archives

Monday, April 28, 2014

WNYC

Paul Robeson Jr. (November 2, 1927 - April 26, 2014) spent much of his life preserving his father's legacy, and in 1976, he came to the WNYC studios to share rare recordings spanning the performer's influential life and singing career.

Robeson and Folk and Baroque host Dave Sear begin with some of ...

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Remembrance of Themes Past

Monday, April 28, 2014

From the February, 1944 WQXR Program Guide.

Dr. Edman, Professor of Philosophy at Columbia University and known for his many books, including the popular Philosopher's Holiday, is one of WQXR most ardent fans. This philosophical reaction to music is one which we feel sure is shared by many of our listeners.

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