Streams

Here—and Everywhere—at The New Yorker Festival

Friday, October 01, 2010

The annual New Yorker Magazine Festival colonizes the city for one weekend a year. When the magazine was founded by the legendary editor Harold Ross in 1925, he famously said that it was not “for the little old lady in Dubuque.” Today, the magazine is national and international in scope, but for the Festival, it calls home its impressive roster of critics, investigative reporters, writers, editors, and other contributors of all stripes to host panels, conduct interviews, and perform in venues all over the city.

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Joshua Foer and Francine Prose

Thursday, September 30, 2010

The opening night of this season's True Story: The KGB Nonfiction Reading Series—a, you guessed it, nonfiction reading series at KGB bar—explored memory, record-keeping and truth, with Joshua Foer (reading from his forthcoming book "Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remember Everything"), and Francine Prose (with a selection from "Anne Frank: The Book, the Life, the Afterlife"). The readers were introduced by one of the series' curators, Anna Wainwright.

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Fate and Accidents at Happy Ending

Monday, September 20, 2010

The Happy Ending Music & Reading Series recently began its new season on an unsettling but vivid note: a program of tales about fateful accidents. 

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An Indian Lit Primer, Courtesy of Salman Rushdie and Tishani Doshi

Monday, September 13, 2010

On Sunday, a line of rain-sopped literary types wrapped around the block to hear British-Indian novelist Salman Rushdie speak to Indian poet and novelist Tishani Doshi at Brooklyn's St. Francis College auditorium.

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Weird Rites and Happy Endings

Monday, July 12, 2010

The Happy Ending Reading and Music Series ended its season on a fantastical note, in a program promising “Metaphors and Epiphanies.”

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Road to Freedom at the Bronx Museum

Thursday, July 01, 2010

45 years after Martin Luther King Jr. led 25,000 marchers to the state capitol in Montgomery Alabama to protest denial of voting right to African Americans, the Bronx Museum is paying tribute to this historic event with photographic exhibit “Road to Freedom: The Civil Rights Movement 1958-1968 and Beyond."  Earlier this spring, several artists and photographers came together at The New School to discuss the works and their context.

 

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Eating during Wartime: Sumptuous Stories from Annia Ciezadlo and Nathan Deuel

Friday, June 18, 2010

Even in wartime, you have to eat, and two writers tell us how they lived and dined in the Middle East at a reading at KGB.

 

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Neil deGrasse Tyson: Pluto’s Best Frenemy

Wednesday, June 16, 2010

WNYC

If you only know one thing about Neil deGrasse Tyson (The Director of the Hayden Planetarium at The American Museum of Natural History ) it is probably that he was the man who outraged a lot of people when he demoted Pluto—it’s not a planet anymore. 

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Turning the Tables at Happy Ending

Thursday, June 10, 2010

If you know what 33 1/3 means, you're either over sixty, an audiophile, or a DJ.

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Living Next to the Enemy

Wednesday, June 09, 2010

In many countries that have been wracked by ethnic cleansing or a civil war, the victims of torture, and the people who tortured them, still live too close for comfort. 

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PEN World Voices Festival: Writers Behind Bars

Wednesday, June 09, 2010

PEN often advocates for writers wrongfully imprisoned for politically reasons, but also chose to devote a panel at its recent World Voices Festival to writers from the more traditional prison community.

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Jason Jones and Maziar Bahari Talk Iran--Again

Wednesday, June 09, 2010

Jason Jones mocks news on The Daily Show, but it wasn't so funny when his interview with journalist Maziar Bahari helped land Bahair in jail.

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Matvei Yankelevich and Rob Fitterman at the Poetry Project

Monday, June 07, 2010

The Poetry Project held a reading on a recent humid Wednesday evening at St. Mark's Church in the East Village featuring the contemporary poets Matvei Yankelevich and Robert Fitterman. Both poets are somewhat topical in their subject matter.  Yankelevich balances idealism with irony in the treatment of his hip themes, while Fitterman favors humor with a hint of self-deprecation.

The room was packed. 

Use the player above to listen to the entire event.

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Traveling Friends: Sharifa Rhodes-Pitt on Harlem and Alice Albinia on the Indus River Valley

Thursday, May 27, 2010

WNYC

Writers Sharifa Rhodes-Pitt and Alice Albinia both write about their journeys and, appropriately enough, met in India while travelling. A mutual acquaintance suggested that Sharifa contact Alice and one day, despite not being in the habit of contacting strangers, she called Alice. They’ve been friends ever since, and joined together to read from their respective works at True Story: The KGB Bar's Nonfiction Reading Series. 

 

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Amiri Baraka at the Poetry Project

Thursday, May 27, 2010

At 76, Amiri Baraka still speaks his mind and ruffles feathers.

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David Remnick On Obama

Thursday, May 27, 2010

David Remnick, editor of The New Yorker magazine, engaged in a candid and casual conversation about his new book, "The Bridge: The Life and Rise of Barack Obama," at Barnes & Noble, Union Square on April 28. After a brief history of why he chose to write a book on Obama, a figure who has been extensively covered, Remnick answered questions from the audience.

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Don’t Judge a Book by Its Cover

Wednesday, May 26, 2010

Remember that old adage about not judging a book by its cover?  Turns out it’s true.

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Kashmir: The Final Cost of Constant Conflict

Wednesday, May 26, 2010

Justine Hardy's In the Valley of the Mist takes us to Kashmir, a land of beauty and unceasing conflict.

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Bird Brains

Wednesday, May 26, 2010

We know birds sing in courtship, but Ofer Tchernichovski, a professor of Biology at CUNY, has been researching the way in which songbirds learn their “language” of song, while drawing some comparisons to human culture along the way. 

 

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The Cosmos: What do We Really Know

Wednesday, May 26, 2010

The Rubin Museum of Art’s Brainwave series pairs neuroscientists with artists and visionaries from multiple disciplines for lively discussions about how our minds work and how we perceive the world.

 

 

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